Question about Honeywell HV-180 Floor / Box Fan

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Trying to find wiring diagram for HV-180 fan controll switch and capacitor?

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  • Iron
    Iron Mar 20, 2011

    Don't open that box if you don't know how to discharge them capacitors.

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Looking far data sheet or equivalent circuit/connection diagram for a 97F9834 capacitor


You can find a datasheet located here. Page 14 contains your capacitor's information. As for a connection diagram, it's fairly simple. The dual capacitor (three prong) has a connection for fan, compressor, and common. Common (typically white) goes in the middle, compressor goes to herm, fan goes to fan. You should see the labels etched into the metal either on the side, top, or bottom. As for the colors of the fan and compressor, the brown wire should be for the fan, and the compressor's wire should be yellow. Of course, your system should contain a wiring diagram, which is usually attached to the door. Consult this diagram before assuming any wire colors I tell you are correct. Also, you should have some form of cutoff switch. Ensure this switch is OFF before doing ANY electrical work on your system. 220v in AC units WILL KILL YOU, especially coming off the capacitor. Best of luck!

Tj

Aug 18, 2011 | GE Heating & Cooling

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Troubleshooting Guide


  • Problem: Totally dead oven.
    Possible causes:
    1. No power to outlet (blown fuse or tripped breaker or GFCI).
    2. Blown main fuse - likely due to other problems.
    3. Open thermal protector or thermal fuse.
    4. Defective controller or its power supply.
    5. Clock needs to be set before other functions will operate (some models).

  • Problem: Totally dead oven after repair.
    Possible causes:
    1. Cabinet screws replaced in incorrect location (safety interlock not engaged).
    2. Any number of screwups. :)

  • Problem: No response to any buttons on touchpad.
    Possible causes:
    1. Door is not closed (some models).
    2. You waited to long (open and close door to wake it up).
    3. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    4. Defective interlock switches.
    5. Faulty controller or its power supply.
    6. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    7. Defective/damaged touchpad.

  • Problem: Oven runs when door is still open.
    Possible causes:
    1. Damaged interlock assembly.
    2. Cooling fans (only) running due to bad sensor or still warm.

  • Problem: Oven starts on its own as soon as door is closed.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective triac or relay.
    2. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    3. Defective controller or its power supply.
    4. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    5. Defective/damaged touchpad.

  • Problem: Oven works but display is blank.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective controller or its power supply.
    2. Broken display panel.
    3. Oven needs to be reset (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).

  • Problem: Whacked out controller or incorrect operation.
    Possible causes:
    1. Previous or multipart cook cycle not complete.
    2. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    3. Defective controller or its power supply.
    4. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    5. Defective/damaged touchpad.
    6. Defective sensor (particulalry covection/mirowave combos).

  • Problem: Erratic behavior.
    Possible causes:
    1. Previous or multipart cook cycle not complete.
    2. Bad connections in controller or microwave generator.
    3. Faulty relay - primary (or HV side, much less commonly used).
    4. Defective controller or its power supply.
    5. Bad contacts/connections on mechanical timers. Intermittent fuse.
    6. Power surge at start of cook cycle confusing controller.
    7. Microwave (RF) leakage into electronics bay.

  • Problem: Some keys on the touchpad do not function or perform the wrong action.
    Possible causes:
    1. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    2. Defective/damaged touchpad.
    3. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    4. Faulty controller.

  • Problem: Microwave oven does not respond to START button.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective START button.
    2. Faulty interlock switches.
    3. Door is not securely closed.
    4. Faulty controller.
    5. You waited too long - open and close door to wake it up!

  • Problem: No heat but otherwise normal operation.
    Possible causes:
    1. Blown fuse in HV transformer primary circuit or HV fuse (if used).
    2. Bad connections (particularly to magnetron filament).
    3. Open thermal protector or thermal fuse.
    4. Open HV capacitor, HV diode, HV transformer, or magnetron filament.
    5. Shorted HV diode, HV capacitor (will blow a fuse), or magnetron.
    6. Defective HV relay (not commonly used).

  • Problem: Timer and light work but no heat, cooling fan, or turntable rotation.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective (lower) door interlock switch or door not closing fully.
    2. Faulty relay or triac.

  • Problem: Fuse blows when closing or opening door:
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective door interlock switch(s).
    2. Interlock switch knocked out of position.
    3. Misaligned door.

  • Problem: Loud hum and/or burning smell when attempting to cook.
    Possible causes:
    1. Shorted HV diode, magnetron.
    2. Burnt carbonized food in or above oven chamber.
    3. Shorted winding in HV transformer.
    4. Frayed insulation on HV wiring.

  • Problem: Arcing in or above oven chamber.
    Possible causes:
    1. Burnt carbonized food deposits.
    2. Exposed sharp metal edges.

  • Problem: Fuse blows when initiating cook cycle.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective interlock switches or misaligned door.
    2. Shorted HV capacitor.
    3. Shorted HV diode.
    4. Shorted magnetron (probably won't blow main fuse but HV fuse if used).
    5. Defective triac.
    6. Old age or power surges.
    7. Defective HV transformer.
    8. Short in wiring due to vibration or poor manufacturing.

  • Problem: Fuse blows when microwave shuts off (during or at end of cook cycle).
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective triac (doesn't turn off properly).
    2. Defective relay.
    3. Shorting wires.

  • Problem: Oven heats on high setting regardless of power setting.
    Possible causes:
    1. Faulty primary relay or triac or HV relay (not commonly used).
    2. Faulty controller.

  • Problem: Oven immediately starts to cook when door is closed.
    Possible causes:
    1. Shorted relay or triac.
    2. Faulty controller.

  • Problem: Oven heats but power seems low or erratic.
    Possible causes:
    1. Low line voltage.
    2. Magnetron with low emission.
    3. Faulty controller or set for wrong mode.
    4. Stirrer (or turntable) not working.
    5. Intermittent connections to magnetron filament or elsewhere.
    6. Faulty primary relay or triac or HV relay (not commonly used).

  • Problem: Oven heats but shuts off randomly.
    Possible causes:
    1. Overheating due to blocked air vents or inoperative cooling fan.
    2. Overheating due to bad magnetron.
    3. Bad connections in controller or microwave generator.
    4. Faulty interlock switch or marginal door alignment.
    5. Faulty controller.
    6. Overheating due to extremely high line voltage.
    7. Stuck stirrer fan resulting hot spots detected by sensors.

  • Problem: Oven makes (possibly erratic) buzzing noise when heating.
    Possible causes:
    1. Fan blades hitting support or shroud.
    2. Vibrating sheet metal.
    3. Vibrating transformer laminations.
    4. Turntable or stirrer hitting some debris.

  • Problem: Oven light does not work.
    Possible causes:
    1. Burnt out bulb :-).
    2. Bad connections.

  • Problem: Fans or turntables that do not work.
    Possible causes:
    1. Gummed up lubrication or bad motor bearing(s).
    2. Loose or broken belt.
    3. Bad motor.
    4. Bad thermostat.
    5. Bad connections.

on Mar 30, 2008 | Kenmore 80412 Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Hello i have a hv-180 18" when i plug it in


Yes. These fans have thermal protection in the motor, as well. The thermal fuse or thermal breaker may be bad.

Mar 09, 2011 | Honeywell HV-180 18" Commercial Grade...

1 Answer

I was trying to install a fan control switch on my Patton floor fan and took the 3 speed switch out and disconnected the wires and cannot figure out what wires (too many colored wires) to connect to the 2...


Thr issue you are having you need to look on the motor and see if there is a diagram but you have to use the grey and white for a capacitor because i have an older fan that has no capacitor. and use the red for high

Dec 28, 2010 | Patton U2-1487 Floor / Box Fan

1 Answer

I have a HV-20G floor fan, And I have no contitnuity between the "white"--(common ) wire and the"red-low", "blue-mid", or "black-hi" wirres.I have 7.3 ohms between the blue&black and blue&red on a...


In that particular model, there is a small thermo fuse connecting the white wire and the yellow wire(there are 2 yellow wires coming from the capacitor). It's hidden in the coil so you can just cut the wick in that area an pull those two wires and you are going to see the fuse(small square shape one).

Sep 14, 2010 | Lakewood HV 18-c Floor / Box Fan

1 Answer

My lakewood high speed floor model HV-21T stopped running. After shutting off it started running again but shut off again and this time the motor and cage was extremely hot.Also are new motors available on...


Try replacing the "start-run" capacitor. It is the rectangular black box mounted on a tab next to the motor inside the cage, two wires attached (cut them close as close to the capacitor body as possible). Other symptoms include not moving at all with a hum, and getting very hot. The capacitor is a 5% tolerance 8 microfarad rated at 250vac. It doesn't have to be the exact form factor but it does have to be heat rated at or above 70C per design parameters of the fan.

WARNING! Make sure to protect the leads properly because this capacitor is connected directly to the power mains during operation. If one of the leads electrically shorted against the fan housing or cage could cause a catastrophic failure of the fan, and possibly a fire, and possibly give a nasty shock to whoever was switching on the fan at the time.

-Brandon

Aug 22, 2010 | Lakewood HV 18-c Floor / Box Fan

1 Answer

Ceiling fan capacitor hook up problem. I have a 3 speed fan. 4 switch. A 3 wire capacitor - CBB61. Kids lost wiring diagram. Any which way I try to wire it up only one of the speeds works. Any wiring...


The reverse switch on my Hampton Bay ceiling fan didn't work. I cut the 6 wires; 1 white, 1 gray, 2 pink, 2 yellow. Here's what I did. Removed reverse switch. Had 6 wires white, gray, 2 yellow, 2 pink. Connected gray to yellow, connected white to pink and fan runs fine. Is this OK? I do not need to reverse fan. It's been running for 1 hour now with no problems. Don S.

May 15, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

I'm looking to replace the fan switch for a hampton bay ceiling fan, but I don't know where the wires go. The colors of the wires are black, yellow, purple, and orange, and the slots on the switch are L,...


This is fairly simple.

Assuming you have a black brick capacitor, and assuming you have the correct switch, for capacitor speed control.... (if you don't you will not blow anything up)

On your capacitor, there should be a set of two wires which are the same color. Black goes to L The two wires which are the same color, one will go to position 1. The other two wires, will go to 2 and 3. On the capacitor it should have some numbers and crude diagram with the color of wire on it. The wire with the highest value (say it's 6) will go to position 2 and the lower value will go to position three.


If you only have one small capacitor in the switch housing, (usually a red and white wire one) then you have a winding taps speed control. If you have a capacitor type switch, you can burn out your motor, as on the second position of that switch it activates both 2 and 3 (or medium and low) Be sure you have a switch which operates as such L+1 L+2 L+3. If you have the proper switch, then all you need to do is connect the black wire to L and then randomly place the other three wires into the switch and test it. Most likely the speeds won't be right (it might go medium, low, high) if it does, then just move the wires around until it goes high medium low.

Mar 31, 2010 | Oasis Hunter 54' Ceiling Fan

1 Answer

I'm trying to install a used Shell Electric Manufacturing (Holdings) Co. LTD. model U42 ceiling fan, however it appears that the internal wiring has been moved around and in some cases cut off. I am...


the black rectangle is a capacitor! there is no diode in a ceiling fan, usually the white wire is the common or neutral , the blue is for lighting and the black one is for the fan

Mar 10, 2009 | Dryers

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