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Amateur HF Radio TS-140s

Have oper and svc manuals..Cannot fin info to reset transmit to normal power aft it was shut down by the ALC system..They don't tell how !!!
I have been reparing radios since the 1930 s..Stumped ..

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There is no reset for the transmit power. the only thing that effects the power is the slider control on the right hand side of the radio that is marked "PWR" and the ALC/PWR switch located under the clear button.

Pat N5SLI

Posted on Aug 20, 2008

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Tip

10 Tips for the PSK31 Digital Mode


PSK31 is arguably the most popular amateur radio
digital mode. It utilized phase-shift-keying to
provide robust, narrow signal width communications,
and requires very little power to QSO the world!

- Use the center of your waterfall. Testing will
show that your transmit (TX) and receive (RX)
will be strongest there. Don’t blindly use 1000Hz
tone or strictly follow the VFO ‘set it and forget it'
concept. You can easily lose 20% or more of
your power on each edge of your pass band.
Pass band centering of the signal will give the
best results of both RX and TX.

-There's no need to have the waterfall streaking
bright red. Set your rig's volume to a low level
(less than 25% of max) and adjust your waterfall
and soundcard levels for a good contrast. Do not
overdrive your soundcard! Get the background
noise and the transmit trace well defined and
separate. Keep in mind, how your waterfall looks
does not impact decoding, but it is harder to work
it if you can’t see it.

- Use UPPER CASE characters sparingly. Lower
case text in PSK31 varicode transmits fewer bits
of data, thus you'll increase transmit speed and
improve the likelihood of proper decoding on the
other end. For example, the difference of a
lowercase e and an uppercase E is five times
more bits! (e=11 vs. E=1101101101)

- Enable your RF Attenuation and increase the
volume. This helps keep a strong signal from
wiping out the weaker ones. Attenuation will
probably be around 20 dB, but by dropping the
noise level, the signal readability improves. AGC
(auto gain control) does nothing for a weak
signal; it only levels the louder ones.

- Use your digital modes software, or a program
like Spectrogram, to see what you noise level is
with the radio off. This will give you an idea of
how 'clean' your soundcard is. Typically,
onboard (built-in) sound hardware (as found in
most 'mainstream' computers like Dell or HP)
does not have a signal-to-noise ratio as good as
an inexpensive (less than $50) separate
soundcard. When purchasing a soundcard, look
for something with over 100 signal-to-noise ratio
in the specifications.

- Consider dual monitors (most modern video
cards have two jacks). This allows you to have
the waterfall or spectrum display on one screen,
and your logger, text window, etc. on the other. It
makes a huge difference in speed and ease-ofuse
when you don't have to swap between
screens or use smaller windows for your QSO.

- Keep your ALC reading during transmit to as
close to zero as possible. This will keep your
signal clean and your IMD at a good level (-20s
or better is ideal). Your power output will drop,
but there's no need to 'smoke' the transmit level.
PSK31 is about an 80% duty cycle. Even with a
full duty cycle rig, it still needs to dissipate heat!
Besides, 20 watts more makes little difference.
Output of around 50W is enough to work the
world, and your fellow CQs will appreciate the
courtesy. Also be sure your voice processor is
NOT enabling when using digital modes.

- Ask for an RSQ (readability, strength, quality)
report! When in a QSO, send just a tone and ask
for your IMD and a report on how your trace
looks. This will give you a better idea of
adjustments needed.

- There are hundreds of digital modes. To get
started or to learn more about the most common
ones, acquire ARRL’s ‘HF digital handbook’ by
Steve Ford, WB8IMY. For the technical types, be
sure to snag Roland Prosch’s (DF3LZ) ‘Technical
Handbook for Radio Monitoring’.

‘BONUS’ TIP:
- Try 30 meters PSK31! It’s a robust band, offering
the best of 20M and 40M. It’s a small segment of
a no contesting band. Used only for digital
modes and CW. Be sure to operate within your
privileges. PSK31 can typically be found around
10.140.

DEFINITIONS of TERMS USED:

AGC (Auto Gain Control): The ability to reduce
signal strength on-the-fly (fast or slow), giving you a
more level audio reception on stronger stations.

ALC (Auto Level Control): A voltage adjustment or
reading, indicating your TX signal levels . ALC is
designed to control voice and carrier signal levels,
not digital modes. Typically, if the ALC meter moves,
then the microphone gain is too high.

Signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio: A comparison of the
signal levels to the relative noise level. Ideally, a
perfect signal would have no noise, but realistically,
you’ll want a S/N ratio well within the tolerances of
the mode you’re using. PSK31 tolerates about a
10dB S/N ratio.

dB: Sound level, or ‘decibels’ are used to measure
the relative strength of a signal.

Digital Mode: A converted signal transmitted from
your radio to be ‘de-converted’ by the receiving
station. Much like a computer modem, a digital feed
is converted to analog, sent across a transmission
medium, then reconverted back to a readable signal
at the receiving station.

Duty cycle: The total time of actual transmission
levels. When your radio is transmitting, there’s an
on/off process that takes place. Transmitting at a
100% duty-cycle indicates that your are using 100%
of your radio’s power, 100% of the time. Better
radios will allow this, while others will eventually fail
under the pressure of such a load.

IMD (Intermodulation Distortion): The ratio, in dB,
used to determine the quality of your transmission.
Unwanted ‘products’ or signals reduces IMD levels.
More power does not mean better copy!

Overdrive: Turning the volume of your radio up so
high that you risk damage to the soundcard, or cause
signal ‘splatter’. Similar to maintaining your ALC
levels.

Pass band: The range that your transceiver can
receive when on a single frequency. Typically
around 3000Hz wide.

PSK (Phase Shift Keying): A form of modulation
that shifts the transmit signal in order to carry more
information. PSK31: is a digital mode created in the
1990’s by Peter Martinez (G3PLX) that is about 31Hz
wide on your waterfall.

RF (Radio Frequency) Attenuation: A suppression
of signals received. You’ll often see a noise level
reduction, with a minor sacrifice to the desired signal
reception. Check your radio’s manual on how to
adjust it.

RSQ (Readability, Strength, Quality): Much like the
familiar ’RST’ reports, using a 599-type reporting
scheme. Instead of ‘Tone’ (Morse Code), use
’Quality’. 95%+ readable, with a very strong waterfall
trace, and a clean (no splatter) signal would warrant
a 599 report.

Soundcard: A piece of hardware in your computer
that produces sound, and often allows input, as with
a microphone.

VFO (Variable Frequency Oscillator): It’s that knob
you use to change frequencies on your radio.

Varicode: A streamlined coding system that allows
nearly whatever your computer keyboard can type to
be transmitted in shorter lengths.

Waterfall: A visual display of radio signals (and other
sounds) found on the tuned frequency.

RELATED WEB LINKS:

ARRL’s ’HF Digital Handbook’,
by Steve Ford, WB8IMY
http://www.arrl.org/catalog/?item=1034

‘Technical Handbook for Radio Monitoring I’,
Roland Prosch’s (DF3LZ)
http://www.hoka.com/th/th_book.htm

Digital Master 780, by Simon Brown, HB9DRV
http://hrd.ham-radio.ch/DM780/DM780.htm

Spectrogram and other software:
http://www.visualizationsoftware.com/

on Apr 28, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

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How to get emperor ts-5010 to transmit on 29.520 fm and receive on 29.620?


This is an "Export-Only" radio that is banned by the FCC for use in the United States. It is a violation of Title 47 U.S.C. for any "CB" radio to be coincidentally capable (or modified to be made capable) of transmitting on frequencies assigned to the Amateur Radio Service. It is also against Federal statutes for any Amateur Radio equipment to be used for communicating on frequencies assigned to the Citizens (CB) radio service.

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Hi Andy,
What you have is an amateur radio which requires a license to operate it.
Having said that, I don't know where you got the unit from, but obviously, the unit has had the frequencies deleted, so you cannot operate it until you go to a radio workshop to have the unit re-programmed.
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web:www.vk6wia.net for all the info re: licensing requirements.

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Firstly, are you a licensed Amateur Radio Operator, if not, you are breaking the law buy transmitting on that frequency. The Amateur 2 metre band, which covers 144 - 148MHz is for the use by Licensed Amateur Radio Operators ONLY.

You are free to listen to these frequencies, because you are a listener, and the radio is being used to receive ONLY.

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My TS-140S is only putting out 20 watts. Is there


Coud be burned one of the power output transistors or perhap the polarization source. 73's Edgardo LU1-AR

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You can increase the power supply to 15 Volts, but your rig is small to dissipate the cold air inside. Place a small fan in the rear. You not need more power and the difference is barely disguisable to the other part. Put your effort in a batter antenna. Regards. Edgardo LU1-AR

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Hello, this problem is solved and how?
I have the same problem on HF and VHF 30Watt max output

1.8 MHz-20M 0-5Watt
10M 25 Watt
6M-30Watt

2M-25Watt

70cm 42Watt is ok
23cm 10Watt is ok

thanks

Tuxon7@gmail.com

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look for a broken or cracked board near the driver s & finals, try pushing around on the board with your plastic screwdriver, you may luck into it.

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