Question about Celestron AstroMaster 114 AZ (50 x 114mm) Telescope

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How do focus the telescope properly. i can never see anything through the telescope except for a blur. I wear glasses would that matter?

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No glasses would not matter. Practice focusing on a distant object during the day time. Locate a local Astronomy club, the members will help you.

Posted on Mar 21, 2011

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I have a Twin Star 76700 and when I focus on a pole during daylight- leave there but can't find anything in it when it gets dark, How do I focus it or find an object at night or is there a problem with...


The easiest way is to simply point it at the sky and focus on any star. (Note: NEVER point your telescope at the sun without appropriate special equipment in place, and the knowledge of how to use it!) Use a low-power eyepiece (one with the longest focal length marked on it, usually about 20mm), and adjust the focus until the star image is as sharp as possible. You may see nothing at first except a dark gray blur, but turn the focus knob in or out until you can see the star image. You will need to adjust focus slightly if you change to a different eyepiece, but it'll be close.

Dec 22, 2014 | Optics

1 Answer

Focus


if the distance between lenses is even a hair's width off then images will be blurred. It may be that either the frame has been damaged and moved the internet components. If it is new or under warranty I would suggest returning it. Telescopes are very delicate instruments.

This is assuming your outer lenses have been cleaned properly and any focusing knobs have been used to attempt in focusing the device. Try looking on the manufacturer's website or calling them for a troubleshooting guide or frequently asked questions. It may give you a fast answer.

Apr 16, 2014 | Vivitar 60x120 Refractor Telescope ...

1 Answer

Hello, I m using the 60700 Telescope but the image i see in lens is very blurred, i assembled my telescope as per Manuel instruction but still i see upside down image with blurred effects. I tried several...


All astronomical telescopes show upside down and or inverted images-- it's normal nothing is wrong. You are applying too much magnification. Do not use the 2x barlow-- and start practicing how to focus using only the eyepiece with the largest number written on it which is your LOWEST power.

You can practice focusing during the daytime on a distant object like a telephone pole or a building.

www.telescopeman.org
www.telescopeman.info
www.telescopeman.us

Jul 29, 2011 | C-Star Optics 60700 (60x700) Telescope

1 Answer

We cant see anything but black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 24, 2011 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

Cannot see anything in the telescope looks dark


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 09, 2011 | Meade DS-2114 ATS (325 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I cant see anything through my telescope


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 07, 2011 | Meade 60AZ-M Jupiter Telescope 60mm...

1 Answer

I have just bought an Astrolon telescope 288 power. I've assembled it following the instructions and I can't see anything. Inside the house I can pick few images but they appear upside down rather than...


All astronomical telescopes show upside down images --- it's normal.

Stars are always points of light no matter what telescope you own. Download this star chart:
www.skymaps.com

Objects in the sky are tiny, smaller than the tip of your finger held at arm's length, try for the moon FIRST which is large. Then try Jupiter which is that very bright "star" to the Southeast after dark.

Read my tips on my profile page.

Dec 26, 2010 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

1 Answer

Cannot focus on anything. All images are a blur.I'm not sure if maybe something is missing from the telescope


Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one. Practice focusing on a distant object during the day time.

Oct 26, 2010 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

1 Answer

Can't focus using 5mm lens


TOO much magnification for that 3 inch telescope. The most you will get is about 120 power or so on perfect sky nights. Try a 10mm or 9 mm as your most powerful eyepiece.

50 times aperture is the maximum possible.

Jan 19, 2010 | Meade ETX-125EC (500 x 127mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I cant see clearly in my telescope not matter how much i adjust the focus lines


If it is a focused image but hazy or foggy, you have to clean the optics in your telescope. If you have a focus problem but a clean image, then you are having travel limitations of your focus equipment usually rack and pinion. Wearing eyeglasses can also effect that mechanical problem and so does other added components like "Barlow Lenses" that are used to double or triple eyepiece magnifications. You might also have the lenses in the optical system not in the right order or direction when it was taken apart.

Apr 17, 2008 | Optics

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