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CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN TO TO ME WHAT IS EV COMPENSATION AND HOW DOES IT WORK

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EV compensation is "Exposure Value compensation". The camera contains an exposure meter which determines how much light is on the scene and sets the exposure appropriately. However, this meter does not know WHAT you're taking a picture of, nor does it know what effect you're going for. The best it can do is to assume you're taking a picture of an "average" scene and want it to be of "average" brightness. It does this by assuming the scene is "middle gray," halfway between black and white. Most of the time this works fine, because most scenes are, well, average.
However, this is not always the case. Suppose you're taking a picture of a white dog playing in the snow. Almost everything in the scene is bright white, but the camera doesn't know that. It tries to make the scene middle gray, and the result is that you get a gray dog playing in gray snow.
On the other hand, suppose you're taking a picture of a black cat sleeping on the hood of a black car. Here everything is black, but the camera doesn't know it. It tries to make an average scene, resulting in a gray cat sleeping on a gray car.
EV compensation allows you to override the camera's exposure setting. In the first example, you'd want to add two or three stops (positive EV compensation) to force the camera to render the dog and snow as white instead of gray. In the second example, you'd want to subtract a stop or two (negative EV compensation) to render the cat black instead of gray.
How much EV compensation is correct? Well, that depends on the scene. With a digital camera, you can look at the picture and see whether the dog looks white or the cat looks black. Film photographers take lots of shot, using various levels of EV compensation, so that one of them would come out right.

Posted on Dec 29, 2011

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1 Answer

How do I change the aperture when my camera is in manual mode


You have to hold down the exposure compensation button at the same time as turning the control dial.
The values appear on the control panel screen.

I found this on page 33 of the manual...
Set the mode dial to M and turn the control dial to set the value.
• To set the shutter speed: Turn the control dial.
To set the aperture value:Turn the control dial while holding down the
[+-](exposure compensation) button.

The exposure level indicator appears on the control panel screen, showing the difference (ranging from -3 EV to +3 EV) between the exposure value calculated by the currently selected aperture
and shutter speed compared to the exposure value considered optimum by the camera.

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go to manual mode to change it sir.

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Exposure compensation sets incorrectly


Hi dear martinboqaar, to correct please press "+/-" key on right side of top cover and rotate command dial to set o,o EV.
regards

Mar 20, 2011 | Nikon D300 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

When i take a picture they all seem 2 come out really bright.mostly white looking rather than a normal colour


Check the exposure compensation on your camera. This is often shown with an "EV" and then a number such as "+1" or "-0.5". If you are getting overly bright images, then you likely have the EV set to +1 or more. This causes the camera to overexpose the image by +1 stops of light, making things whiter.
Without specific camera name and models, I cannot give you the exact steps to solve this, however on most DSLR cameras, you simply hold down a button on the body while rotating a dial on the body. Usually the button looks something like this: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/K100D/ZPOWERSWITCH.JPG In the above image, the button below the shutter release with the +/- symbol is the EV button. Simply hold that while rotating a dial on the body until "EV 0.0" shows up in your viewfinder or in live view.
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Feb 12, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Pictures white out; pictures are completely overexposed; I've had this problem with Casio cameras before; The video capacity works fine, it just can't take any clear pictures. All pictures come out...


Check the exposure compensation setting:
  • In REC mode, press MENU
  • Select the "Quality" tab and select "EV-Shift"
  • Set the exposure compensation value to zero.
If this doesn't help, please post a sample picture (e.g. upload an unedited full size image to http://imageshack.us/ and post the link as a comment).

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1 Answer

Photes are very over exposed, Fiji f700


Check your exposure compensation adjustment. If that is set high, then all your shots will be over-exposed until it is brought down to the "0" setting. A relative had this problem with a different camera, and all it took was resetting the exposure compensation to make things work correctly.

I often set cameras with a default exposure compensation of -0.3 EV since blown highlights are so distracting.

Sep 25, 2008 | Cameras

2 Answers

Indoor pictures are way too dark


Most cameras have an EV or a +/- exposure setting. Go into the menu and check for EV compensation, or a " +/- " button. Set it to overexpose " + " one stop at a time til you get what you want. Please leave feedback if this helps.

Jul 26, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Instructions for operating leica vario-elmar minilux zoom


I don't have a C1, but in all probability it's the EV (exposure value) compensation adjustment, and should be variable between about +2 and -2. Usually the middle/zero/auto/normal (whatever they call it) setting is fine, but sometimes you want to overrule your automatic exposure settings, which are intended for an average-brightness scene. For example, a photo of a dazzling white snow-covered field will probably come out a soft, easy-on-the-eyes light gray unless you kick up the exposure a notch or two. Try taking your camera to an unusually bright/dim location (a beach, inside an old church) and take the same shot five times, with EVs from -2 through 0 to +2. Then look at the resulting photos and decide whether the effects are pleasing/useful or not (warning--sometimes automatic photo processors will try to reset the picture to average when they print the photo, so you may still end up with minimal differences in the shots). A good beginner-level explanation of EV compensation is at <http://www.imaging-resource.com/ARTS/EVCOMP/EVCOMP.HTM>.

Good luck!

Lenny

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1 Answer

Panasonic Lumix DMC TZ3


I guess and do mean guess the sensitivity tails off sharply in low light- and it is operating at the limmits of its capability therefore no further compensation is possible. But Get Panasonic in on the act - Panasonic Technical Support.

Jul 07, 2007 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Aperture Priority Mode - an undocumented feature


In addition to the "quirks" of the Landscape and Aperture Priority Modes (neither mode works as documented!)..... The camera also behaves differently in full Manual Mode (it changes the settings, whether you want it to or not to compensate for available light)... At lower Zoom Levels, the camera will adjust the Shutter Speed Only, to try and compensate for available light... For example: with the Camera preset to F5.6 Aperture, and 1/48 sec. shutter speed, the camera will adjust the shutter speed between a range of 1/30 to 1/291 sec, to try and "auto expose" the shot for lower or higher light levels, even though you're in manual mode. At an Aperture Setting of 2.8 and 1/48 of a second, the number of internal steps in shutter speed the camera is willing to take, increases dramatially - for example: shutter speeds up to 1/600 of a second, even though you have the shutter set to 1/48 in manual mode. The camera WILL NOT attempt to adjust the Aperture to compensate for proper exposure in available light (OR WILL IT??).... It depends on your Zoom settings! It won't if your're near to full wide angle, but IT WILL if you are using the Zoom. Once you cross some unknown zoom threshold (it doesn't have to be at full zoom), then the camera begins to change both the Aperture and Shutter speed to compensate for available light, even though you are in "Full Manual", versus Auto Exposure Mode. In Manual Mode, (as in Aperture Priority Mode), the amount of change the camera is willing to make to your settings, appears to be related to a preset number of internal steps, with the number of steps dependent on both Aperture and Zoom Settings, before it gives an EV Warning for Over or Under Exposure conditions.... The type (shutter speed only for wide angle, shutter and aperture for zoom) and amount (number of internal "steps" it takes to increase/decrease shutter speed and increase or decrease aperture), is dependent on the amount of zoom you are using for the current shot.

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