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It is a GE JGBP35GEP2WG. When I push the bake or the broil button and wait for the oven to turn on this is what occurs: The igniter does not glow and the gas is not released. The ON sympbol in the electronic controller is on and turns itself off after about 20 seconds. This occurs for the broil and for the bake. I replaced the bake ignitoer. The broil igniter is ok. Still have same problem. I wiould like to get a free copy of the electrical schematic for the oven but can not find online.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

SolutionGuy
  • 331 Answers

SOURCE: GE JGRP17 Gas Oven

Rosanne, he problem with your oven is the igniter. The igniter is wired in series with a safety valve. The safety valve monitors the amount of electrical current flowing through the igniter when you ask it to "bake".  When the igniter gets "weak" it won't allow current to flow through it properly, this will keep the oven from heating.

Before you begin the repair, you should have the new part on hand. The part number is WB2X9154 and can be purchased at your local appliance parts retailer for about $50.00. Here's one online for $65.00.

First, UNPLUG YOUR OVEN OR TURN IT OFF AT THE BREAKER!

To replace it... Remove the racks and look up at the broiler manifold. You'll see the igniter mounted at the rear (the round thing with 2 wires going to it). You'll need a 1/4" socket or nut driver to remove it.

(*TIP---> before removing the screws from the igniter, put a few drops of liquid dish soap on the threads to lubricate them. If you do this, you will not strip the threads of the screws and it will ease their removal.)

The new igniter kit will have two ceramic wire nuts in it. Cut the two wires off of the old igniter and strip them back about 3/8". Then connect the wires of your new one to the wires in the oven using the ceramic wire nuts provided. Then mount the new igniter, tuck any loose wires as far back into the oven as possible and replace the racks.

(*TIP---> The new igniter is very fragile! [that's why it came wrapped tightly in bubble wrap] Handle it gently!)

There ya go! Total job time? ~45 minutes.

Posted on Oct 11, 2007

Amigaman
  • 248 Answers

SOURCE: bake burner

It is almost always a weak bake igniter. These age and will no longer pull enough current through them to allow gas valve to open. If bake igniter comes on and doesn't light, replace it.

Posted on Nov 18, 2007

  • 3230 Answers

SOURCE: GE JTP 1580W288 Set oven to Bake, switches to broil at bake temp

The F2 Error code means the oven has detected an excess temperature condition. Most often this is due to a bad temperature sensor - the sensor costs about $75 from an online repair site. 
How to remove and replace the temperature sensor. In most GE ovens, when you open the door, you'll see the rod-shaped temperature sensor sticking out of the back wall at the upper left. It's about six inches long and a bit more than 1/8" in diameter, held in place with two screws. 

Turn off the circuit breaker (built-in ovens) or unplug the range before attempting the replacement. 

The replacement sensor will come with instructions, but basically it's a matter of removing the sensor, pulling out the wires to where they are connected and disconnecting them. You may have to snip. The replacement sensor will come with high-temp wire nuts to hold the new connection. Polarity doesn't matter; it's a straight resistance thermocouple. Hook it up, be sure you poke the connections back far enough so that they're on the other side of the thermal insulation and not resting against the back of the oven. 

If you continue getting the F2 error after replacing the sensor, then the problem is likely in the control module - this is the circuit board behind the keypad and clock. 

You'll need to remove the decorative bezel to get behind the control panel. Remove screws and set off parts in order - it's not complicated. Once the bezel is off there are two more screws that hold the panel in place. Then you can lift the panel up about a half inch and pivot it forward toward you. You'll see a bunch of wires going to a circuit board. 

On the panel you will notice some black plastic boxes that say "Potter & Brumfield" on them. These are relays. Check the relays - slide the black plastic cover straight up to expose the coil and the contacts. The coil, when energized, closes the contacts - look at all the relays. You can manually close the contacts with your finger (be gentle). If the contacts of one of them are stuck, they might be welded together. You can fix the problem by prying apart the welded contacts gently with a knife blade. Take some time to gently polish the relay contacts with a folded bit of fine grain sandpaper - this will get some more life out of them. Be gentle and careful - the relays aren't complicated but if you bend the contact or rip it out, you'll have to replace the controller, which will set you back a couple hundred dollars. If you unstick and burnish the relays, they will probably eventually weld together again as the rough spot will spark, but when you burnish them with sandpaper they should be good for some more life before they need to be replaced. 

If the problem isn't the temp sensor or welded relay contacts then the problem is obviously somewhere else, but temp sensor and relay contacts will account for the lion's share of F2 errors. 

Once again, be safe, be careful, be gentle. Ovens are not very complicated and they're tough, but always exercise care. Always disconnect electricity before messing with them.
good luck,

Posted on Jun 28, 2009

SOURCE: gas oven won't light on bake setting

If the bake ignitor comes on (starts glowing) - check the amperage on the bake ignitor wires when it's on. If the ignitor is a round style - amperage should be 2.5-3A, if the ignitor is rectangular - 3 - 3.6A. If less than 2.5A or 3A respectively - replace ignitor. If the ignitor does not come on - check the voltage on the ignitor, should be the line voltage 110-120v AC. Faulty gas valve is uncommon, but still a small possibility. Ignitor part numbers for round style ones: 4342528, WB2X9154, SGR403, 5304401265;
rectangular styles: 12400035, WB13K21, WB2X9998, SGR412, NR020, 5303935066, 814269, 9753108.
Ignitors of the same shape (i.e. rectangular) are interchangeable, if you can splice the wires.

PS For your model number the original part number was WB13K4 or WB13K0004, which is a round ignitor, though on the breakdown a rectangular one is shown, so check carefully.

Good luck!

Posted on Jul 15, 2010

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1 Answer

Oven not heating- both baking and broil elements


It may be possible that the electronic control is bad. On some models there are three relays one for the bake and one for the broil and one for the common. This one goes out and the bake and broil will not work. The control is fairly expensive you may want to have a tech check it out.

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I have kenmore gas oven ignitor glows but will not light


Hello there:
It doesn't bake dot_lineone.gif Bake igniter
When the bake igniter becomes weak or burns out, your oven would not bake. The bake igniter is usually mounted on the oven burner. It's about 1 inch by 4-8 inches (depending on the model), and comes in round or flat styles. If you don't see the igniter glow at all, it's probably burned out. Replace the igniter if found defective. Note: one of the exceptions could be that your oven is set to automatic mode instead of manual. If this is the case, set your oven to manual mode and check again.

If the bake igniter glows red and not bright yellow or white, it is probably because it is too weak. When this happens, the safety valve would not let the gas out into the oven burner. A weak igniter must be replaced.

A faulty igniter is probably the most common cause, however there are others:

-- defective thermostat
-- defective selector switch
-- defective gas safety valve

If you are certain the igniter is ok, it might be a good idea to call a professional appliance technician.

Need a new oven igniter? Click here for most common oven igniters or enter your oven model number in our PART SEARCH. ^ top clear.gif It doesn't broil dot_lineone.gif Broil igniter
When the broil igniter becomes weak or burns out, your oven would not broil. The broil igniter is usually mounted on the oven burner. It's about 1 inch by 4-8 inches (depending on the model), and comes in round or flat styles. If you don't see the igniter glow at all, it's probably burned out. Replace the igniter if found defective. Note: one of the exceptions could be that your oven is set to automatic mode instead of manual. If this is the case, set your oven to manual mode and check again.

If the broil igniter glows red and not bright yellow or white, it is probably because it is too weak. When this happens, the safety valve would not let the gas out into the oven burner. A weak igniter must be replaced.

A faulty igniter is probably the most common cause, however there are others:

-- defective thermostat
-- defective selector switch
-- defective gas safety valve

Read more: http://www.appliancepartspros.com/repairtips/repairtips_range_oven.aspx#ixzz1CgFQ7lBJ
http://www.appliancepartspros.com

Feb 01, 2011 | Kenmore 33169 Gas Single Oven

1 Answer

I replaced what I thought was a bad igniter.But still had no glow from new igniter. Must be something else.Where do I go from here?


Hello there: The oven bake burner and ignition components are located beneath the oven cavity. In most cases the oven bottom panel can be removed for access (check your owner's manual) but on some models the oven burner has to be accessed from below in the warming or broiler drawer area. If accessing from the top, a 'flame spreader' (flat metal plate) above the burner may also need to be removed to see the burner itself.Many ovens use a single oven burner in which case they only have a single gas valve and ignitor. The same burner is used for both bake and broil functions, the broil usually being in the drawer area below the oven. Higher-end models may have a separate bake and broil burner. On such a system there will be two ignitors, one for each burner. They may also employ a 'dual' gas valve (see illustration above) instead of using a separate valve for each burner.Some range models may have an additional broil burner located at the top of the oven cavity which may be referred to as a 'waist high' broil. If not, broiling usually takes place in the drawer area below the oven, which uses the same bake burner for the broil function. Most gas ranges currently available employ one of 3 basic gas ignition systems; pilot ignition, hot surface ignition system (which uses a 'glow bar' or 'glow coil' - aka an "ignitor") and a spark ignition system. The latter two being referred to as "electronic ignition" systems as they use electricity in one form or another to operate the oven heating system. Only the pilot ignition system has an actual "pilot" (which is a small but real "flame") which might need manual lighting.
If the surface burners of a range are a spark ignition type, the oven IS one of the possible kinds of electronic ignition systems and thus will not usually have a "pilot" which needs lighting. Be aware though that just because the surface burners might light via a spark doesn't necessarily mean the oven uses the spark type ignition system too.
There is one older style of electronic ignition system which does also use an oven pilot but it is very rare and such a system hasn't been used in oven models since the early to mid 70's. It is the 'constant pilot' *electronic ignition* system.


Making Observations
The oven burner's operation will usually need to be directly observed while in operation as the first step to troubleshooting problems.Ignition System Type Links
Ignition System Types:
  • Pilot Ignition
  • Electronic Ignition with Constant Pilot (rare)
  • Electronic Ignition with Glow Ignitor (most common)
  • Spark Ignition System

  • Is there continuity between the oven gas valve's terminals?


    Hot Surface ('Glow Bar') Ignition System (most common)
    This is the most popular system currently used for ovens and is comprised of a control mechanism (whether thermostat or electronic control), the oven ignitor and an oven gas valve.


    What happens in this style ignition system is that the thermostat or electronic control switches power to the oven ignitor and gas valve circuit which are connected in series (one after the other). As power flows through the ignitor it heats and draws current (measured in amperage). Once the oven ignitor draws a specific amount of current the oven valve opens to allow gas to flow to the oven burner where the glowing hot ignitor (glow bar) ignites it. Power must continually flow through the ignitor and oven gas valve for gas to be released into the oven burner to create a flame.

    It should usually only take in the area of 30-90 seconds for the oven ignitor to reach the proper resistance to allow the proper amperage to reach the gas valve to open it and for the ignitor to ignite the gas at the oven burner.

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