Question about Makita Saws

1 Answer

When cutting 18mm ply wood using a straight edge after a few centimetres the cut curves under the material even with a new blade. thank you

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that has over 500 points.

  • Expert
  • 257 Answers

Unfortunately that is just to thick of material to cut with a jig saw blade. Plywood is made up of several layers and your blade is trying to follow the grain on one of them. You can try a metal blade and high motor speed low travel rate, but it will quickly heat up the blade and warp it making your problem worse if you don't stop often. If you are trying to make straight and curved cuts, I have the best luck with a rotary cutter such as the roto zip, but plywood easily snaps the bits.

Posted on Mar 14, 2011

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Setting up a jig saw to cut a straight 1/4 inch


Hi there,

You will need two C clamps and a straight edge,I use a metal yard stick.Whatever you use look down the edge a make sure it's true.

Set up on the line and make sure the blade is going to cut on the waste side of the line.Measure the distance from the edge of the wood to the other side of the jigsaw glide plate and make a mark.Transfer the measurement to the other end.I move the blade up just above the surface so I can set the jig saw on the wood while I get the measurements.The last step is to clamp the straight edge down.Make sure to have the clamps with the handles down.Check under to make sure you won't run into any thing and do a dry run to check for cord hang ups.This is the best way as long as you keep the edge of the bottom jig saw plate against the straight edge.^^^^ Well that's how I do it. good luck

You can all so use the T bar attachment that slides through the bottom plate and clamps down with thumb screws.Personally I like the straight edge.

May 10, 2011 | Skil 94500 Jig Saw Rip Fence

2 Answers

What can be done with a scoll saw, table legs?, what uses is the scroll saw for


Scroll saws use a small thin blade that runs up and down very fast. It is used to cut curved designs out of flat wood. Table legs are made on a lathe, it spins a square or round piece of wood to make legs, baseball bats.

Mar 01, 2011 | Garden

1 Answer

Blade does not make straight cut and turns.


it may be the blade is worn out and has lost its edge on one side or it could be its too lose, on the other hand if your pushing the wood through to fast not letting the blade cut it first it wont cut straight

Mar 27, 2010 | Delta BS100 Shopmaster 9 Inch Bench Top...

1 Answer

How to cut a 45 degree angle on wood using a jig saw


use a combination sliding square to mark ecxactly where you want to cut. Measure the distance from the jig-saw blade to the edge of the jig-saw bottom plate. Use this distance to mark another line parralel to the first line. Nail or screew a straight piece of wood on the second line. Put the jig-saw plate against the wood fence and cut your perfect line.

Mar 17, 2010 | Franke EuroPro Series GN1845SP Solid Wood...

2 Answers

Cutting straight


this is usually caused by a dull blade or you need to carefully re-adjust the blade guides

Aug 12, 2009 | Ryobi 9 in. Benchtop Band Saw

2 Answers

Ryobi Bandsaw model EBW4023L will not cut straight


I do a lot of resawing with mine and I have found that a 3/8" wide blade gives me nice straight cuts.

Jun 19, 2009 | Ryobi 9 in. Benchtop Band Saw

1 Answer

Blade misalignment


The 1590, like several Bosch jigsaws, has a selector switch to choose the type of cutting action. You have to choose the appropriate cutting action, either straight or oscillating, to accommodate the material you cut and the blade you cut with. For instance, if using a very slender blade for clean curved cuts in wood, a slight oscillating motion ( setting II or III) reduces friction on the blade. 
If you choose the straight cutting action you get maximum accuracy, but drastically increase the friction because the blade is held firmly to the roller bearing.  A slender blade can handle that for brief periods, (say... less than thirty seconds) in soft, thin wood with a straight cut. In hard woods or engineered wood products ( plywood, MDF etc.) the thin blade will heat up and bend. 
You can reduce friction by choosing an oscillating cutting motion, or you can use a larger, sturdier blade. The "Aggressor" blades do not cut as smoothly as the "clean" blades, but they cut faster and are stronger. To cut thick wood ( 4x4 ) or a long cut in engineered material, that is the blade I use. Select number III or number II for 'type-of-cut' and use a bigger blade. See if that stops the "bucking."
Good luck!

Mar 24, 2009 | Bosch 1590EVSK 6.4 Amp Top Handle Jigsaw

1 Answer

Grinder question


Use a pencil and straight edge to mark the cutting line on the wood. Place the wood on the saw table and line the mark up with the saw. Place the mark on the right side of the blade to ensure proper cutting. Plug the saw in and put on your safety goggles. Support the wood on the work surface with your left hand, placing it far from the saw blade. Place your right hand on the handle, and push the trigger to start the saw. Move the saw blade down onto the wood. Put constant pressure on the handle to slowly move the blade through the wood. Release the trigger and raise the blade once the cut is complete. Make diagonal cuts in the same manner, by marking the wood and lining the mark up just to the right of the saw blade. Continue as you would for a straight cut. Remove the wood from the saw. Unplug the chop saw and dust the sawdust off. Remove the dust bag from the back and empty it. Vacuum any remaining dust off of the saw.

Aug 27, 2008 | Dremel 10 Diamond Cut-Off Wheels Saw Disc...

2 Answers

Blade Types


remember to match the blade width to the type of cutting you are doing. Also keep in mind: * Narrow Blades can make much tighter radius cuts, but tend to twist and wander when making long straight cuts. * Wide Blades can't make the tight turns that narrow ones can, but they hold a straighter line than their narrow counterparts. * The tpi determines the speed with which the blade cuts through stock. Blades with high tpi cut slower but leave a very smooth edge. They are best for detail work on thin stock. Blades with low tpi cut quickly and leave a slightly rough edge. They are great for resawing or long rip cuts. * Steel Blades are inexpensive and work well for cutting softwood. Steel blades, however, dull quickly in hardwood. * Bimetal Blades are made of high-speed steel and can cut thin metal or wood. * Carbide Blades are for wood cutting only. They are more expensive than other blades but stay sharper longer than steel or high-speed steel.

Aug 27, 2008 | Dewalt Variable Speed Deep Cut Band Saw...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Saws Logo

Related Topics:

193 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Makita Saws Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

ray gallant

Level 3 Expert

46202 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76846 Answers

Are you a Makita Saw Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...