Question about Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM Lens

2 Answers

After clicking the shutter button, the camera body gives error 99 and the viewfinder will be very dim, on checking the aperture is shut down to a tiny hole, something like f/16 or 22, even though my setting was f/2.8 or 4. Happened many times, in different scenarios like outdoor and indoor aircon. So I ruled out temperature. I have also never dropped, abuse or rough-handled the lens. Also, the IS seem to vibrate non stop sometimes. By vibrate I mean really shake non-stop for up to 10-20 seconds. The whole viewfinder is like in an earthquake. Standard treatment of cleaning contacts was also done with no help. Anyone have the same problem and got a workaround? I'm stopping short of sending to Canon Service Centre because I don't have the time and I need my lens almost every few days.

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  • 93 Answers

Last i heard of the same occurance on a 24-105, it turned out to be a problem with the main board on the lens. Sounds like it needs CSC. Better send it in. Is the lens still under warranty?

Posted on Mar 14, 2011

Testimonial: "That's quick and to the point... :)"

  • 2 more comments 
  • Turtell Mar 14, 2011

    How many days it'll take?

  • Tanvir M
    Tanvir M Mar 14, 2011

    It'll take around 1.5wks.

  • Samwise Wilson
    Samwise Wilson Mar 14, 2011

    Apart from its wrong.

    The error can be due to the CF card, or the camera.

  • Tanvir M
    Tanvir M Mar 14, 2011

    My answer was based on the question which says "Problem with the Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM Lens"

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    MVP:

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  • 132 Answers

When the communications between the camera body and the lens would have some non-Canon message pop in there, the body will display Err 99. There are other diverse reasons for Err 99, but lens-to-body problems are common.
ER 99 is a general error message.
Does this happen with other lenses? - If not the logic inside the lens has probably been corrupted. And it would need to be serviced by canon.

Posted on Mar 14, 2011

  • Samwise Wilson
    Samwise Wilson Mar 14, 2011

    o isolate the cause of the issue, we suggest that you do the
    following:

    1. Turn off the camera.
    2. Remove the lens, battery, and CF card.
    3. Allow the camera to sit without power for approximately 20 minutes.
    4. Insert a fully charged battery, and turn on the camera.

    Does the "ERR 99" message appear? If it does, then the camera should
    be serviced. If it does not, then please proceed to the next set of
    steps:

    1. Turn off the camera.
    2. Insert the CF card.
    3. Turn on the camera.
    4. Format the CF card in the camera.

    Does the "ERR 99" message appear? If so, then the CF card is the most
    likely source of the issue. Try using a different card.

    If the message does not appear, please complete the following steps:

    1. Turn off the camera.
    2. Clean the lens contacts by gently rubbing them with a pencil eraser
    or soft cloth. Be careful that you do not let any debris fall into the
    camera body.
    3. Reattach your lens.
    4. Turn on the camera.

    If the "ERR 99" message only appears when one particular lens is
    attached, then that lens should be examined by a service technician.

    If you see the "ERR 99" with a different Canon lens attached, then the
    camera should be serviced.

  • Tanvir M
    Tanvir M Mar 14, 2011

    I think this is a great suggestion for new users...

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1 Answer

I advise a high school yearbook and we shoot a d100. Today it's too dark to see through the viewfinder (yes the lens cap is removed), and i ger the r06 error. I've reset the camera, removed and...


First, the "r06" message is NOT an error code. It indicates the number of shots remaining in the internal memory buffer, before the camera must prevent additional shutter actuations so that it may transfer those images already in the buffer to the memory card. This "r" number will decrease with each shot taken in rapid succession until it reaches 0. The shutter release will no longer work until the buffer is transferred to the memory card, then shooting may continue again.

As far as not being able to even see through the viewfinder, it sounds like something may be obstructing the light from reaching the meter and viewfinder. The problem is most likely the position of mirror inside the camera body. With the lens off the body, the mirror should be plainly visible at about a 45 degree angle to the opening. A side view drawing of this is below. The solid red line is the mirror in the normal position. The red dashed line is the up position of the mirror when the shutter is released.

steve_con_93.jpg

When the mirror is in the "normal" position, the light from the lens is projected on a screen so that the image is visible in the viewfinder for composing and can be metered. When in the "up" position (when the shutter release is fully depressed), the light from the lens is projected on the camera's sensor for as long as set by the manual settings or program; based on ISO, aperture, etc. At the end of this time, the mirror returns to the "normal" position.

If your D100's mirror is not in the lowered 45 degree angle position, the image seen in the viewfinder is inside the camera - not that which the lens would project. Hence, the dark viewfinder, long exposure times and - I'm guessing - severely overexposed pictures because way too much light is striking the sensor because the meter is only seeing darkness.

If the mirror is ok, with the lens removed from the body, look for the aperture lever as shown in the yellow circle in the picture below:

steve_con_92.jpg

By default, the aperture is at minimum. The camera moves the lever from this position to full open (and anywhere between) as needed. You should gently move the lever to the other end of its travel to open the aperture to maximum. Point the lens away from a light source but preferably at a light colored background. Look through the lens. There should be no obstructions and be clear. Next, look at a dark colored background to find the same results. If you want, you can even allow sunlight to shine through the lens onto a sheet of paper (like a magnifying glass). The result should be a bright circle with no obstructions. Obstructions in the lens will prevent the meter in the camera from getting accurate information about the scene and if significant enough, prevent viewing through the viewfinder.

You may wish to have the camera & lens professionally cleaned and serviced to repair a mirror or lens issue.

If this was helpful, please rate it as such. Good luck!

Oct 04, 2011 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Every time I turn on the camera it sais Error 99 could anyone explain it to me .thanks chris


According to ehow:

Turn off your camera and remove the memory card, lens, battery and time/date secondary battery. The secondary battery is a small, round battery about the size of a dime found in the same compartment as the main battery. It is located in a vertical slot. Slide out the secondary battery by pressing your finger on the battery and pulling it toward you.
  • Place the body cap on your camera to keep dust out. Attach the front and back lens caps on your lens to prevent scratches and other damage.
  • Let the camera sit for 20 minutes. This will clear the camera's memory.
  • Place the date/time secondary battery and a fully charged primary battery in the camera and turn it on.
  • Press the shutter release button (the button you push to take a picture). If you are still receiving an Error 99, the problem is most likely caused by the camera body itself. The camera body must be serviced by a professional camera technician.
  • 6 Turn off the camera and insert the memory card. Turn the camera back on and press the shutter release button. If you are receiving an Error 99, the error is most likely caused by the memory card. Turn off your camera and insert a different memory card. Turn the camera back on and press the shutter release again.
  • Turn off the camera and reattach the lens. Turn on the camera and press the shutter release button. If you receive an Error 99, turn the camera off and remove the lens.
  • Turn the camera so that it is face down, and gently clean the lens contacts on the camera body with a number 2 pencil eraser or soft cloth. The lens contacts are the eight small, gold pieces on the bottom of the lens mount. Be careful not to let any of the eraser scraps fall into the camera body.
  • Turn the lens so that the side that attaches to the camera is upside down. Use the eraser or soft cloth to clean the lens contacts on the lens, being careful not to let any eraser scraps fall into the lens.
  • Reattach the lens to the camera. Turn on the camera and press the shutter release button. If you are receiving an Error 99, the error is most likely caused by the lens. Take the lens to a professional camera technician for repair.
  • May 11, 2011 | Cameras

    1 Answer

    Today, my Nikon d40 was showing an error message "press shutter button to release" and was taking very dark photos. Now, the error message is gone, but all photos are still very dark, even with...


    Hi,1) Your camera has damage to the aperture control mechanism.
    2) If you look in the viewfinder the image darkened, mayhave bent the aperture control lever.
    In one must turn for service.
    In two carefully can solve
    You can also check whether the mechanism malfunctions diaphragm aperture setting to full and see that this does not close completely,pressing the shutter release button.
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    Feb 21, 2011 | Cameras

    1 Answer

    For use on a non-Hasselblad camera, can I use the aperture preview button (which locks) to set aperture?


    There is no communications between the camera and lens. When using a set up like this everything becomes manual and you must remember to stop down the aperture to your taking aperture before releasing the shutter. I don't know what camera or format you are going to use this lens with but assuming it is a digital "bridge" (a camera that is between an amateur and a pro) or a professional the sequence would be the same.
    To view, focus and compose the lens would be set in this case F2, to select the correct light meter reading the lens is set (stopped) down to the taking aperture. The modes I've used for this have been mostly manual but lately I found that "AV" worked equally well and the camera metered to the proper exposure. Most times the camera was mounted on a tripod and the shutter was released with a electronic shutter release.
    Sequence for taking a photo for me anyway was/is (with the camera mounted on a tripod) focus, compose, stop down to taking aperture, check metering and release the shutter if in AV mode or manual mode to set the shutter speed and release the shutter.
    You will find that all makes of digital cameras will function differently so what sequence works for one won't work on others. This meaning I have had digital cameras that wouldn't meter through anything other then the lenses meant specifically for them.
    Problems that I've had. Forgetting to stop down to taking aperture (like Duh), not fine focusing (manual), not trusting the in focus indicator, forgetting that the viewfinder is/was only 94% of the scene. Once a little time has been spent with a lens set up like this the rewards are far beyond the trivial annoyances. Have fun with it

    Jan 12, 2011 | Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

    1 Answer

    The light meter is not working, in AV mode the shutter speed constantly remain at 30 seconds.


    It would be nice to know what camera make and model you have. However in AV mode the photographer inputs the aperture (AV meaning Aperture Priority). If you then have the aperture set at (for example) F11 and dim lighting conditions the shutter speed will be long in an attempt to give the correct exposure. If you have a meter reading you see in the viewfinder the needle will be way to the - side of the scale it may be dim enough that attempting to adjust the Aperture a few stops makes no difference in this reading. My though is, if the meter is working in "P" program and you are getting correct exposure then it's user input error rather then meter malfunction.

    Jan 07, 2011 | Canon Cameras

    1 Answer

    How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


    OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

    The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

    Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

    In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

    It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

    Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

    May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

    1 Answer

    Aperture priority malfunction


    davidsucklin,
    You can use the film lens with the D80, but it it not react to the same settings as it did with the film body, the multiplier factor for the focal length is going to be different and it may be stopped down a bit. When you are shooting in aperture mode are you adjusting your shutter and ISO? The camera and the lens have to be communicating the same info to one another inorder for it to work. First set the camera back to auto mode the check the shot to see the settings (f-stop, shutter speed) test them with different ISO's to see what the camera thinks the settings should be, then go back to manual on the camera and lens and try the shutter priority mode with the aperture ring set at the 2.8 to see if it works then change to Aperture mode with the same settings that can take the picture. If it doesn't work keep in mind som of the older D lenses will drop some functionality (like aperture) in certain configurations. You can verfify compatibilty of your specific lens on Nikon's support site.
    randy320sgi

    Jan 24, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

    1 Answer

    Error in body


    Remove lens, CF card, and battery. Leave in a dry and slightly warm place for 24 hours. Clean lens contacts with a cloth or cue tip and eclipse/alcohol.
    If the camera doesn't turn on after this, even without CF card and lens attached, then it needs to go to a Canon service centre. Don't tell them you got it wet, and maybe it will get repaired FOC.

    Jul 07, 2008 | Canon EOS-20D Body only Digital Camera

    1 Answer

    Really Dark Viewfinder


    That would explain the darkness if the lens is stopped down. It would seem the aperture control is faulty on the camera body. Normally, the aperture remains open until you take the picture. It is only closed down while the shutter is open.

    Feb 11, 2008 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

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