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I'm on manual setting and it keeps automatically setting it to -2 exposure, and my photos keep turning out black.

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  • Richard Busch Mar 14, 2011

    Can you please tell me what exact brand and model camera you're using? Thanks.

  • eatbrian Mar 14, 2011

    hi what kind of camera are you using

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  • Master
  • 11,967 Answers

Go into the "exposure compensation" (the button with the +/-) and make sure the setting is at "0".

Posted on Mar 14, 2011

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We are trying to set up some product photos with a white background and 2 x 1000W soft boxes The background is coming out grey not white How do we set up to give us a bright white background and clear...


1 • Unlock focus area selector. • Auto-area AF selected for Custom Setting 2 (AFarea mode): choose another mode. • Press shutter-release button halfway to turn monitor o?¬? or activate exposure meter • Memory card is full, locked, or not inserted. • Flash is charging. • Camera is not in focus. • CPU lens with aperture ring attached without locking aperture at highest f/-number. • Non-CPU lens is attached: rotate camera mode dial to M. • Mode dial rotated to S after shutter speed of bulb selected in mode M: choose new shutter speed • P, S, A, and M modes: lower ?¬? ash. • Digital Vari-Program modes: turn ?¬? ash o?¬? Turn long exposure noise reduction o?¬? Turn long exposure noise reduction o?¬? Press multi selector up or down or rotate sub-command dial to choose photo information displayed Select All for Playback folder. Note that Current will automatically be selected when next photo is taken •

Jan 31, 2011 | Olympus SP-500 UZ Digital Camera

1 Answer

Whats the best setting for taking pictures when out at night time?


Photographyat night can be used to create mysterious and amazing photos. When I sayphotography at night I mean the hours from around sunset until when the starsare clearly visible. The long exposures associated with low light can createunique effects and unusually sharp photos. And when I say long exposures I meanexposures lasting from half a second up to even 30 seconds. An exposure thatlong would seem impossible to prevent shaking, so my technique that I use veryoften is to compose the photo like I would normally and then to set theself-timer so the camera takes the picture on its own and I don't even have totouch it.
EquipmentOptions For lowlight photos, a tripod (or some kind of substitute) is very necessary. I almostalways keep a tripod in the trunk of my car or carry a miniature tripod aroundon trips. A miniature tripod can be very handy because it is typically smallenough to fit in a pants pocket so it can be taken anywhere. Some photographerscarry around a bean bag or something like it so that can set their camera downand tilt it in any way they like. Some of my best pictures I have taken simplyby setting my camera down on a newspaper stand and setting the self-timer.

Many photographers are convinced that they need a cable release to take longexposures but the self-timer release option on just about all cameras worksjust as well. All you have to do is set the camera up, configure theself-timer, press the shutter button, and wait the specified amount of time(usually 10 seconds) and the camera will take the photo automatically. And youdon't have to touch the camera so the photo won't be blurred from hand shaking.

Night Photo Opportunities
Landscape Photos - My favorite kind of night photousually includes a landscape with some kind of foreground element, some sort offraming element, and lots of lights throughout the scene. Adding some kind offoreground item to the frame helps to create a greater depth of field, thistechnique works for any kind of photo but I have found that it makes nightlandscape photos much better. Another tip you should keep in mind is that themain subject of a night photo should probably be the most well lit. Lots oflight is good for a night exposure but there should still be some focus appliedto the major objects in a scene.
CapturingMotion - A verypopular kind of night photography includes a steady camera with some sort offast moving object streaming through the frame. When cars are photographed atnight with a long shutter speed, the headlights make a bright pathway of lightand in most cases the car can't even be seen. Another option would be to set upyour camera next to a lighted area with lots of people moving like a night clubor an illuminated street. Just about any kind of motion captured with thecamera steady produces a very interesting photo.

Balancing Aperture and Shutter SpeedWhen taking photos at night you should keep aperture in mind as well asshutter speed. It is without question that you will need a long shutter speed,but the aperture that you choose will provide the depth of field. When I takenight photos I usually have a very long shutter speed (5-15 seconds) and a verynarrow aperture (high f-stop). This combination creates a huge depth of fieldand makes everything very crisp and in focus. Of course sometimes you will notdesire a great depth of field and in those situations you should widen theaperture (small f-stop).

Calculating the ExposureFiguring out what exact shutter speed and aperture you should use can bevery challenging in Manual Mode. I would recommend that you just try manydifferent combinations for each scene and eventually you will refine thesettings that you prefer. Another technique I use is Bracketing, if you bracketall your photos so the camera takes multiple exposures at different settings,you are more likely to end up with a photo that has a satisfactory brightness.
Conclusion There is no exact science to night photography; I hope some of these tips willguide you in the right direction. But the best night photographers are usuallythe people who experiment a lot when they are taking low light exposures andeventually they figure out the best scenes and best exposure settings to match.Just remember that you need a very long shutter speed setting, and that youneed to keep the camera very steady.

Dec 09, 2010 | Nikon Coolpix S210 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When I turn my camera on it automatically flips to show the exposure compensation button. The only way I can get it to go away and take a photo is to push the lock button and then it lets me take a photo....


Why don't you push the exposure compensation button (the one that's half-black/half-white with a plus and minus) make sure the setting is on "0" and push the button again to turn it off.

Nov 01, 2010 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I want to know that how to adjust exposure level in sharp 1118 or how to make light copy with diganostics mode


l For manual copy density adjustment, press the AUTO/
MANUAL/PHOTO ( / / ) key to select
MANUAL ( ) and adjust with the LIGHT ( ) and
DARK ( ) keys as desired.
l For photographs, select PHOTO ( ) and then adjust with the
LIGHT ( ) and DARK ( ) keys as desired.
l There are 9 exposure steps indicated by 5 indicator lights. (The
indicators light up one or two at a time.)
Successive pushes of the LIGHT ( ) key will change the
indicator lights in the order (3) / (3•2) /(2) / (2•1) / (1).
Successive pushes of the DARK ( ) key will change the
indicator lights in the order (3) / (3•4) / (4) / (4•5)/ (5)
The automatic exposure level can be adjusted to suit your copying
needs.
1 Press the AUTO/MANUAL/PHOTO ( / / ) key
to select the PHOTO ( ) mode.
2 Press and hold the AUTO/MANUAL/PHOTO ( / /
) key for approximately 5 seconds.
l The PHOTO ( ) indicator will go out and the AUTO indicator
will begin to blink.
l One or two exposure indicators corresponding to the automatic
exposure level which has been selected will light up. The factory
default setting is level “3”.
3 Press the LIGHT ( ) or DARK ( ) key to lighten
or darken the automatic exposure level as desired.
4 Press the AUTO/MANUAL/PHOTO ( / / ) key.
l The AUTO indicator will stop blinking and will light up steadily.
l This automatic exposure level will remain in effect until you
change it again by this procedure.
Automatic exposure adjustment
AUTO

Jul 27, 2009 | Sharp Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Over exposure photos


Try change the exposure of the camera: start the camera, set the dial to 'I' (automatic iso), then press the 'up' menu near the display until 'exposure' settings appear. move the slider to the left/right, according to your preference.
I reccomend using the automatic iso for taking pictures, it automatically adjust exposure.

Apr 25, 2009 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Manual shooting mode problem.


The exposure compensation dial (at the back) doesn't work when you're in Manual. In Manual, you set the shutter speed and aperture to get an image with the amount of over- or under-exposure you need. In the view finder, the "exposure meter" at the bottom shows how much light there is where the lens is pointed. When it shows what you called "2-stops", its really underexposed. Thus your black images. You need to increase ISO, open the aperture and slow down the shutter speed (or a combination of these 3 options)

Set your camera to P or full-auto. Do the photos turn out ok? If they do, then there's nothing wrong with your camera and you just need practise on the Manual mode.

Aug 13, 2008 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

2 Answers

Indoor pictures are way too dark


Most cameras have an EV or a +/- exposure setting. Go into the menu and check for EV compensation, or a " +/- " button. Set it to overexpose " + " one stop at a time til you get what you want. Please leave feedback if this helps.

Jul 26, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Copies are too light and nothing is working


Probably needs a good cleaning. The mirrors get dusty. I would suggest you call a tech. to do it. As you can nock something out of wack.

Jul 24, 2007 | Sharp AL 1631 Copier

2 Answers

Shutter priority mode?


s I understand it from what I have seen on the Web, the 3000Z can operate in several modes: 1. Fully automatic (camera select both 2. Manual (user sets both aperture and shutter speed). 3. Aperture Priority mode - user sets aperture and camera chooses correct shutter speed to get a good exposure Apparently there is no Shutter Priority mode (user cannot set only the shutter er speed and allow the camera to set the aperature to get a good exposure). This option is available on the Epson 850Z camera and this seems like a silly ommision to make on a "high-end" camera like the 3000Z.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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