Question about Cameras

1 Answer

I'll load the film in the back and the iso will show up but says film number is on 0, whats going on

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 14 Answers

I'm assuming you're using a film camera then.
Try taking a photo just to make sure that the camera doesn't count up starting from zero (depends on your camera model).
Most likely when the film was loaded either:
1. The holes on the film were not lined up with the sprocket teeth in the camera.
or
2. The the film needed to be pulled out just a little further so that it is laid across MORE of the sprocket.
i'll load the film in - zrichard_0.jpg

Posted on Mar 14, 2011

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

ISO DX ERR


What speed film? Does the roll have the DX markings (the black-and-silver rectangles)? If it doesn't, what happens if you set the film speed manually?

Mar 22, 2013 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I bought this canon rebel t2 film camera recently and used film with ASO 400. Portraits look ok. but the landscapes, especially the sky area look dark and grainy. I used ef 28-135mm usm lens. Any solutions...


That's odd that the pictures would be coming out under exposed unless the previous owner has gone into the camera functions and switched the ISO from auto to manual. Another reason is that the exposure compensation has been activated and set for - exposure

Under "normal" use the camera will read the DX code on the film canisters and adjust the ISO automatically. However the previous owner may have shut this off in preference to setting the ISO manually. Even though you have ISO 400 in the camera the ISO on in the camera setting may be ISO 1600.

Checking for the Auto ISO and exposure compensation is fairly easy as you can see the film canister through the film window or you know you have loaded 400 speed film. on the LCD panel at the back of the camera is an ISO icon and exposure compensation.

Make sure the ISO for the camera is the same as what you have loaded and if the exposure compensation is to the right of 0 then the resulting picture will be dark. Move this back to the Zero.

I wasn't able to find an exact manual (if you don't have one) for your camera but have found a camera with similar. Here is a ling for that manual.

http://www.butkus.org/chinon/canon/canon_eos_rebel_ti/canon_eos_rebel_ti.htm

Hope this was a help

Dec 18, 2010 | Canon EOS Rebel T2 with 28-90 lens 35mm...

1 Answer

Just recieived a used Nikon N80 and it gives the message of open door.Frame counter and film indicator flashes when door is shut and no film is in in camera?


Confirm tht DX shows in LCD. If not then press and hold shift button then press ISO so "DX" appears.Open Camera Back. Insert film cartridge, pull film leader out to right and align with red index mark (inside film chamber on right). Make sure there is no slack in leader.Close camera back until lock release snaps closed. Fully depress shutter until film advances to first frame.
Confirm " 1" and film transport show in LCD. If Film is not loaded correctly, "ERR" show on LCD. Open cack and reload film.
Users manual can be downloaded from:
http://www.lensinc.net/manuals/Nikon_N6006L.pdf

Nov 03, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have a ricoh kr-30sp camera will not come on and what kind of film do I use


With the camera turned on, look in the viewfinder. Down on the bottom right side is an LCD display, if it's blank then your camera probably has dead batteries. It takes 2 x CR1/3N or 4 x SR44.

Your film accepts 35mm negative film or 35mm transparency (aka slide) film. It will accept any ISO from 12 to 3200, but in practice all you'll usually need are ISO 100, ISO 200 or ISO 400. You choose the film based upon lighting conditions and the lenses you'll be using, but in general you'll use ISO 100 if shooting mainly outdoors in daylight, ISO 400 if shooting in low light or with a telephoto lens, and ISO 200 is a general all-rounder good for most things. ISO is usually referred to as film speed as higher numbers need less exposure than lower numbers but the trade-off is a less detailed image.

To load film into your camera and to set the camera to match the film ISO setting refer to this link to the manual provided by Norman Butkus. The manual will also guide you through all other aspects of operating your camera.

I hope that I have fully answered your question, but if not please add a comment and I shall respond in due course. If your question has been answered, then please let me know by taking a moment to rate my answer.

Sep 15, 2010 | Ricoh KR-30SP 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have a 35mm nikon camera. I've changed the batteries but the film won't load. how can i load the film?


Here is what to look at: Custom Function number 8, "Auto film load when back is closed", default setting is 1 disabled on 0 it is enabled. If you have the manual for the F80 (same as N80) look on page 21 and page 72 and 73.If that is not the issue check the following: With the new batteries does the camera turn on, Can you focus, does the LCD light up? All that will let you know if you are getting power to the camera. If the answer is yes then the film should load so now check the inside of the camera back. Does it have the pressure are and roller next to the hinge. If that is missing then when you pull the film to the red dot, close the camera back there is nothing to put pressure on the film for it to load.

Aug 06, 2010 | Nikon F80 35mm Film Camera

1 Answer

How so I inaert film


I'm not familiar with your exact model so what follows is generic to many film SLR cameras and assumes that the camera is already empty:-

Open the back of the camera by pulling upwards the rewind crank on the top left hand end of the camera (as viewed from behind). The back of the camera should pop open a little, open it all the way.

Before fitting the film, check if the film can is DX coded. It will have DX printed on it somewhere if it is, but will also have a large area bare metal squares interspaced with printed black squares or rectangles. if the film is not DX coded then look for an ISO number, ASA number or DIN number and note it somewhere.

Drop the roll of film into the space at the left of the camera, and push the rewind crank back down to secure the film canister. Pull out the film leader across to the right hand end of the camera. Often there are printed instructions or diagrams showing what to do. Your camera probably has an easy loading system in which you pull the film leader until it's level with a printed line and then close the camera back until it clicks.

Turn the camera on, normally it will staert whirring as it autoloads the fil onto the take up spool. If successful the number one will appear in the film counter display within a few seconds. If not then open the camera back and try again.

What you do next depends on whether the film is DX coded or not. There will either be a dial or a menu item which allows you to set the film speed, for DX coded films set the control to DX or to AUTO. If the film is a rare non DX-coded one then you need to set the speed manually. Select the correct ISO number in the menu. If your film had an ASA number then use it as an ISO number and if it had a DIN number then look up DIN to ISO conversion online.

If this has solved your problem then please return the favour by rating my answer, thanks.

Jun 30, 2009 | Minolta Dynax 404Si Film Camera

1 Answer

How do i change ISO/ASA on the nikon N65?


The ISO is automatically set by the DX code on your film canister - if there is no code, the camera sets ISO 100. If you load canisters yourself with, say ISO 400 film, you can adjust the exposure using the exposure compensation button at the top right side of the LCD ( " +/- " ). Using ISO 400 film set the +/- to minus 2 ( -2 ) so that it will UNDEREXPOSE 2 stops since the film is 2 stops ( 4X ) more sensitive than ISO 100 film.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

2 Answers

Will not load film


Is the lithium positive side down?

Jun 19, 2008 | Minolta Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter speed


Did You ever use a SLR back in the stone age when all we had was film?
Film was/is rated with a ISO number, the higher the number the faster the film.
Fast film had fewer and larger grains of silver iodide, (the particles that changed tone, color etc.when exposed to light), therefore it took less light to take a picture.

The down side was a increase in grain. Large grains meant that blow ups, 8x10, 11x14, posters, etc were not as sharp,
as with slow ( low ISO film)
Most outdoor photos had plenty of light so the film had more grains ( high ISO) to capture the available light, and the result was a much sharper image.

Portrait photography used very very slow film ( your 50 ISO setting) but in a studio you had all the artificial lighting you needed, so your portrait came out with very fine detail.

Now the FE-280 does not have a shutter setting, but we can compensate by changing the ISO setting, and the overall effect will be.
Fastest= 1600 ISO for very little light and poorest picture quality.
Slowest=50 ISO for plenty of light and the highest picture quality

200 ISO was the most popular because it worked well outdoors and indoors with a flash, with very good overall picture quality.

400 ISO was a good choice for gloomy days and medium lighting conditions.

Your ISO settings on the FE-280 will have a similar effect.
My best advice is to play around with the different settings until you develop a knack for it, we used to use light meters and a lot of guesswork, quite expensive when you had to buy film and pay for processing.

OK enough history. heres how....
Turn dial to (P) PROGRAMAUTO
Press (MENU)
The camera menu in center is bracketed, Press (OK)
Scroll down one bar on the on screen menu to (ISO)
Press (OK)
Scroll up or down to desired ISO
Press (OK)
TAH DA !

All other functions will be automatic or any other setting that you might choose..
If you change the dial and later go back again to (P) it will retain your selected ISO setting, which is displayed, on screen.

I hope I was help full, and you enjoy some of the special effects that you will now be able try.
By the way... good taste in cameras.
Best regards, Paul

May 18, 2008 | Olympus FE-280 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

26 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Steve

Level 3 Expert

3287 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75822 Answers

Are you a Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...