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I have a 110v Intertherm Softheat II unit which has worked for many years. Recently it has quit heating. The red thermostat light come on but no heat. Is there any fix to this problem or is my unit asking to be retired and replaced?

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 49 Answers

SOURCE: Intertherm to Honeywell thermostat

Typically if you have a yellow wire in the "y" terminal blue is used as common or "c". As far as your jumper from rc to rh, that will depend upon what type of heat you have. If all of your heat and cooling come from your packaged unit outside, yes you will need the jumper. If this does not work maybe you have a bad breaker or transfomer.

Posted on Oct 14, 2007

22yooper
  • 828 Answers

SOURCE: intertherm outside unit - s3ba-036k - does not run

Measure the voltage across the line. The outside unit normally runs on 220 Volts. Measuring each side of the line to ground will give 110 Volts. If your outside disconnect is of a fused type one fuse could be blown. If a fuse is blown on one side of the line you will read zero volts differential across the line.

Check the type of fuse used in the disconnect. Make sure the proper size time delay fuse is installed on both sides of the line at the disconnect.

Posted on May 17, 2008

  • 69 Answers

SOURCE: wiring diagram for intertherm ac heating unit

Your best bet is to contact Intertherm and see if you can get the Installation/ owners guide.

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

  • 534 Answers

SOURCE: my intertherm furnace (old model) has recently

Your blower motor has several speeds to it and by the problem you are having it sounds as though the blower motor may be going out. The motor has a slower speed for the heating cycle and since you have the noise in the heating mode I suggest having the blower motor changed as soon as possible since it could cause other problems in the heating section of the furnace( possibly burning out the high limit switches). Good Luck on your repairs hope this helped

Dave

Posted on Oct 20, 2009

TheMazz
  • 78 Answers

SOURCE: What's the difference between EM HEAT and AUX HEAT?

Sorry, neither of these answers are completely correct.
You have a heat pump (or the wrong thermostat). Let's assume you have a heat pump.

In air conditioning mode, it works like every air conditioner you have ever had, but...

In heat mode, it reverses its operation. Have you ever felt the air coming out of the outdoor unit of your A/C unit? It's hot, isn't it. And the air coming out of the indoor unit (out of the registers) is cold. Now for a heat pump to produce heat it simply runs the air conditioner in reverse and the heat comes out in the house and the cold is released outside. Neat, huh!

Here's the problem with heat pumps...when it is really cold outside the heat pump can't produce enough heat to heat your home. So it has an additional heat source called "Auxiliary Heat". This heat comes on automatically when the house doesn't get warm enough. The source of this heat is based on the region of the country you are in. North/Northeast generally have oil heat, other regions have gas, and still others have to use electricity to heat. In Texas, we usually use electricity as the supplementary heat on heat pumps. VERY EXPENSIVE!

Now the "Emergency Heat"...this is exactly as stated in Solution #2. This is manually turned on by YOU at the thermostat when your heat pump fails. This turns on the auxilliary heaters and turns off the heat pump (remember, the reverse air conditioner). Again, this can be quite expensive to run if your heat source uses electricity! Gas and oil may be cheaper. The emergency heat is only designed (normally) to keep the house livable (not comfortable) until the Heating Tech can get out to you and fix your heat pump.

Something else you should know. It is normal for a heat pump's outdoor coil to frost up during heating mode. It will detect this and go into DEFROST mode and melt the frost off the coil. While it is doing this, it will turn on the auxilliary heater to keep the air blowing in the house at a reasonable "warm" temperature, but it will not be as hot as normal. In fact, heat pumps produce a lower temperature heat than traditional heaters. So the air may feel cooler during heating than you are use to anyway. This is normal and is not a sign of a problem.

So what do you do: Set your thermostat to the temperature you want and set the controls for HEAT/COOL and FAN-AUTO/ON and leave the EMERG HEAT off unless your heat pump breaks.

As always, keep your filters clean and your outdoor unit's coils clean and free of debris.

Hope this explains your question for you!

Posted on Oct 28, 2009

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This is a very common feature on these types of simple, high-volume, low-cost home appliances known as a safety fault. This fault will temporarily (or permanently) disable the appliance and happens for several reasons: (1) an over-temp (high heat) occurrence, (2) an over-power (power surge) occurrence, (3) an under-power (power outage or trickle power) occurrence, (4) an over-time occurrence (auto-off fails), (5) a short-circuit occurrence (exposed/crossed/frayed wires, etc.). Fortunately, it uses a digital "fuse" system and can be reset by the user. However, there is no universal reset process on SoftHeat products so you just have to play with it until you figure it out (customer service dept is no help). Mine is a Kaz SoftHeat HP980PT, with a red power indicator/power-off button and 4 green heat setting buttons. Mine faulted after a heavy storm caused multiple power outages and power surges in my neighborhood. The green light on the highest heat setting button was flashing on mine. Here's how I fixed it: (1) unplugged both ends of power cord and straightened out the cord, then plugged back in to the heating pad end. (2) While holding down the flashing light button, I plugged back in to the wall outlet. (3) While still holding down the flashing light button, pressed and held down the red power-off button, then while still holding down the red power button, I released the flashing light button, followed by releasing the power-off button. This stopped the flashing green light and caused the red power indicator light to stay on (steady-on). It works fine now. Note: Some models have an actual hard fuse in addition to the digital fault feature or possibly only a simple fuse (without the digital fault system). These fuses can the found at many retail stores and then very easily replaced. I hope this helps some of you!!!

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1 Answer

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You have caught me without my old books, but I can tell you the orange wire is for the reversing valve on a heat pump. Almost all manufacturers, except for Lennox, are: R=Power (24volts), G=Indoor fan (Blower), Y=Cooling (A/C), and W=Heat. Some t'stat's are set up to use 2 separate transformers (24 volt), that is why you will see Rc, Rh. This is power for cooling and power for heating. If this is what you have, just take the Red wire and strip it back far enough to go under both screw terminals if the unit is a residential one. I've been doing commercial work for over 20 years and have never seen an "A" terminal, so I can't help you there. You may want to double check that. If I'm reading you correctly, I would put the orange wire on the "O" terminal. Don't understand why the "Y" terminal is not used. It turns on the compressor. The "O" goes to the reversing valve to "Tell" the outdoor unit that it is either in the cooling or heating mode.

Good Luck and let me know if I can help any further.

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I am assuming this is a heat pump? (Typical when the t-stat has a green light.).

Please confirm

If a heat pump, is the outdoor unit frozen up? There can be some frosting, but it should not be a block of ice.

If there is an emergency heat switch on the t-stat, can you flip that to emergency heat? Do you get heat then?

Pleas advise and I can help you troubleshoot this problem further.

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Red= power........White=heat.............Green=fan.................(grey)-(yellow)=cool .....these are the connectons. Disconnect these wires from the thermostat and know that red/power is the only wire that send power to the thermostat, and the rest sends it back to the unit to call for whatever,, red--to . white for heat... red to green for fan .... &red to grey for cool! OK! Turn all your power on, and use a jumper wire from red / green for fan and see if the fan comes on! Then move the jumper wire from red to green , to red / to white for heat and the fan , wait for 3 minutes before removing and going to the next step. Then red /to grey for cool and check if the outside comes on. Either you have a wire touching past the insulations and making a connection, a bad thermostat ,oe excessive wire lead touching the next connection.Thank you very much!

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1 Answer

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It sounds like the unit is going into a defrost cycle, which is normal for heat pumps and means all is working ok when it gets around 35 or colder they start to do this more often when the red light goes back off , the outdoor fan should come back on. You may also notice steam (may look like smoke) coming from outdoor unit. Is that what happens??

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Typically if you have a yellow wire in the "y" terminal blue is used as common or "c". As far as your jumper from rc to rh, that will depend upon what type of heat you have. If all of your heat and cooling come from your packaged unit outside, yes you will need the jumper. If this does not work maybe you have a bad breaker or transfomer.

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