Question about Oceanic Scuba Diving & Snorkeling

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I have an Oceanic depth & tank pressure gage that I purchased (with US diver regulators in 1987, last serviced and used in 2008) how often does it need to be serviced? the battery is dead, so the automatic digital read outs no longer work

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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likha
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SOURCE: depth display

reset your factory settings!

Posted on Oct 03, 2007

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SOURCE: 2001 Pontiac Montana Temperature Gage and Fuel Gage malfunction

sending unit or float in gas tank, check if any broken wires or well plugged in and then check the float for the gas.

Posted on Dec 23, 2008

scubastephe
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SOURCE: service kit for oceanic delta 4 regulator (1st and 2nd stage)

go to the oceanic web sit there they have listings of local dive centers that repair or send it to oceanic for certified repairs.you need to be certified in repairs to do repairs

Posted on Aug 31, 2009

emissionwiz
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Posted on May 30, 2010

al_kupchella
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SOURCE: Worked fine previously. Now when turned on the

What happens when you twist the regulated pressure knob, as you would to increase the regulated pressure? Does the knob turn? Does it turn until it stops, but still reads zero? If so, it sounds like the regulator pressure spring is broken. That's inside the regulator, and you will probably have to replace the regulator.

Posted on Jun 16, 2010

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A diver swims horizontally 8 m below the water surface how much pressure acts on his back?


given: h=8m
row=1025kg/m^3
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dHg=13,600kg/m^3
g-9.8 N/kg

P=8mx1025kg/m^3x9.8N/kg and then cancelled kg
P=8,200N/m^3
P=8,200Pascal (Pa)

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I recently bought this from dive show but can you please tell me what the switch is on top of reg


It changes the amount of resistance needed for the air to be released, ie if you are diving at depth you may feel that you are having to work hard to breath, if you adjust the lever it will become easier. In converse as you come to the surface if the reg starts to free flow you can adjust the lever to stop it. Happy bubble blowing :)

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During the last 2 dives after dropping below 12 or 11 hundred pound of pressure in the tank at 45 to 60 ft in depth my computer will start blinking all numbers and will register 5000 or 4600 lbs of...


Hi Mike, never heard of that specific problem, maybe the pressure sensor is faulty. I would strongly recommend that you do not dive with this computer set up until you get it serviced/repaired as it may not be recording data correctly and will not be calculating your correct nitrogen build up.

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The front cover of the 2nd stage is broken on


How about going to a Oceanic dealer? Eh? They should be able sell you the parts and install them. Remember, life support equipment should be serviced annually, and said replacements would be part of that service.

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Service kit for oceanic delta 4 regulator (1st and 2nd stage)


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Mar 02, 2009 | Victor CSR350D Oxygen Regulator

1 Answer

What is the maximum time you can get out of a scuba tank?


There are four main variables affecting this: 1. The (total) internal volume of the tank(s) 2. The pressure to which that tank has been filled 3. The ambient pressure at depth 4. The rate at which the diver uses the air out of that tank for their breathing and buoyancy control (including drysuit inflation). The first three are simply a matter of physics and will be the same for everyone under the same circumstances. The major variation comes from the last one, which is usually a function of the diver's experience/ competence (not the same thing!). One who is less so will go through air quicker than one who is more so. So the best answer for your question is "It depends..."! However, many resorts and guides set a maximum dive time of one hour, so they know when to expect a diver back on the boat (or, when they have to call out the Coastguard!). This might be the source of your friend's assertion. FYI: The current world record for breathing off a single tank of air while sitting at the bottom of a swimming pool is a little bit short of 8 hours. The divers in question were using 12-litre cylinders charged to 200B and breathing verrrry slowly! (approximately 12 x 200 litres / 460 minutes = 5.22 l/min)

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Why do scuba diving pressure gauges reach 5000 psi if a tank may only be filled to a max of around 3200?


Scuba tanks can be filled well past 3200psi. When they do a hydrostatic test it is well beyond any pressure that any dive shop will fill a tank to. The highest I've seen the pressure get in my tank is 4000 and that is when the filler at the dive shop forgot about it.

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

Guidelines to Scuba Regulator Purchase


The scuba regulator is employed in an open-circuit scuba set. Said scuba equipment reduces high air pressure conveyed by the diving cylinder to the first stage and feeds breathable gas to the diver through the second stage's mouthpiece. Also called pressure regulator or demand regulator, the scuba equipment is one of the essentials to diving that determines breathing quality and inhalation effort during the dive. But given the different types of regulators and the pertinent design of its first and second stage components, how should a neophyte diver - or even a seasoned diver at that, choose a scuba regulator that incorporates user adjustment and delivers a venturi-assisted air flow in its features? Consider your diving purpose and frequency. Better yet, take note of the following criteria to guide you in your purchase: 1. The Scuba Regulator's Mouthpiece. Check the specifications if the regulator is outfitted with a patented orthodontic mouthpiece. This implies that it is ergonomically-designed to accommodate an overbite or underbite by the human mouth. An ergonomic mouthpiece helps reduce fatigue in the mouth and jaw area, particularly in the cruise of lower depths and extended dives. 2. User Adjustment Settings. There are optimally-designed scuba regulators that are outfitted with adjustment levers to therefore allow divers to finetune valve settings in order to provide the least possible inhalation effort throughout the dive. One notable scuba equipment is the Aeris AT 400 Pro Regulator that is equipped with an adjustable second stage. 3. Weight of the Scuba Regulator. Visualize yourself on a dive and using just any other type of scuba regulator. Is the regulator bulky to considerably increase drag and cause jaw fatigue or is it buoyant enough for you to carry around with your mouth? Lightweight scuba regulators use polycarbonate thermoplastics for its housing to make the scuba equipment compact, sturdy and corrosion-resistant that makes them fit for extended use. 4. Nitrox Compatibility. This entails an ocular inspection of the cylinder tank (Nitrogen and Oxygen proportions) and scuba regulator (Nitrox compatibility) specifications. As a matter of convention, most regulators are suited for nitrox mixture use out of the box; containing the standard, maximum proportion of 40% Oxygen (in terms of volume) but then again, there are gas mixes supporting leaner proportions of oxygen such as the trimix. Therefore, check if the scuba regulator supports the gas mixture configured for your diving cylinder prior to purchase. 5. No-Contaminant Feature. As much as possible, choose a diving regulator that has been manufactured using Dry Valve Technology (DVT). DVT operates through an automatic valve that prevents contamination of the first stage mechanism to thus prevent regulator flooding and the entry of moisture or dust particles. This likely improves scuba regulator performance and extends its useful life. 6. Air-Sharing Feature. This feature often associated with octopus regulators (used as a spare demand valve or alternate second stage) will prove to be most helpful during diving emergencies such as a free flow or during diver rescues. High performance octopus regulators such as the Aeris Gyro Octopus Regulator are designed lightweight and with air-sharing feature, while sporting an inline swivel for convenience mounting and flexibility

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1 Answer

How and why scuba gauges give a diver critical information while scuba diving?


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

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