Question about Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope 60% OFF w/ Land Eyepiece, Red Dot Finderscope, Tripod FREE UPS

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We are trying to test out viewing land based objects using the 30X eyepiece, which according to the instructions, should appear right side up and not upside down! This is not happening.

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It's NOT really a problem. ALL reflector style telescopes show upside down images. This will not affect your star gazing since there is no UP OR DOWN in outer space. Read my tips on my profile page.

You can buy an "erecting diagonal" for terrestrial viewing- BUT this is not what an astronomical telescope is actually used for.

So align the small finder scope on a distant object like the top of a telescope pole during the day time. Point the main tube at the pole and get the tip top in the main tube's eyepiece. Without moving the telescope adjust the crosshairs on the finder scope on the exact same spot. The moon should be your first target at night and you can check and refine the finder scope on the moon.

Posted on Mar 12, 2011

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1 Answer

I have a Bushnell Voyager telescope and can't see anything thru it at night!


Did you set it up according to the provided instructions?
Do you have a low power eyepiece inserted at the viewing end?
Have you aimed the telescope at the moon as a basic test of
visibility?
If your telescope is not properly aimed at the target (a star or a planet, or other object in the night sky) then you will see nothing.
If the power of your eyepiece is too large and your telescope aim is
not "dead on", then you will see nothing.
Have you tried using the scope in the daytime? Do you see anything?
Aim at a specific object, or section of an object, like the top of a lamp-post about a block or two away, and see if you can focus on
it the eyepiece.
You really need someone at your side who has experience in using
astronomical telescopes. That would be the quickest way to solve
any problems you have.
Unless your question is very specific, and unless you provide as
much detail as possible about your problem, it will be difficult for
anyone to provide you with speecific answers that will help you
solve your problem.
joy,
walt

May 06, 2014 | Bushnell 789961 Voyager Sky Tour 700mm X...

1 Answer

No image through lenses


1. During the daylight point the telescope towards an object (water tower, building ) something about 1/2 mile away.
2. Locate the object in your finder.
3. Use the 12.5mm lens (50x) and look through the telescope. Do not use the erect prism
4. Align the finder to what you see in the scope.
5. You can use the 4mm to fine adjust the finder.
6. On a good, clear night.Leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium ( about a hour) Point the finder towards the moon
7. Use the 12.5mm and then focus on the moon.

Note: This is NOT a quality scope. Avoid any scope with .965 eyepieces and silly magnifications! Max power on this scope on a PERFECT night is 200x and Huygens (H12.5) eyepieces give very narrow and poor viewing. Do not use the 3x barlow or the erecting prism. the erecting prism is for terrestrial viewing only and the barlow, although it increases the eyepiece by 3x, will also narrow the view.
Good Luck!

Dec 05, 2011 | Rokinon 62550 Telescope

1 Answer

Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...


Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 22, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

When i look through it everything is upside down


That's entirely normal and correct for ALL astronomical telescopes.

If you want to use it to view land or sea based objects (terrestrial viewing), you need to fit an erecting tube between the telescope and the eyepiece. This corrects the image at the expense of some loss of image quality which is OK for terrestrial daytime viewing but unacceptable for night-time astronomical viewing of what are mostly very faint low contrast objects.

Please take a moment to rate my answer.

Sep 24, 2010 | Meade Field LX10 Tripod

1 Answer

Cannot focus model AP-78-9570 Bushnell Telescope


Is this your telescope?
http://www.binocularsdirect.com/Bushnell_Telescopes/dptsmzmyqcq.html

Can you try replacing the eyepieces on the side with the one on the back. Also if you "slightly" slide the eyepiece OUT does it come to focus?

I must tell you this is a very unusual design with a turrent AND another eyepiece on the back. Has the rotary eyepiece module become loose from the back of the tube? Can you push it in closer to the tube?

Other than forward or backward adjustment that's all the focuser will do.

Mar 01, 2010 | Bushnell Banner Dusk & Dawn 3.5-10x36 AO...

1 Answer

I bought these for my husband. In trying them


Difficult to answer specifically without knowing the model. But binoculars are designed to view objects in the distance. They all have a limit as to how close they will focus based on the magnification and design. Objective lenses that are far apart such as on a porro prism binocular will not focus very close. The nature of the design of having the objectives further apart than the eyepieces doesn't allow it. When trying to focus too close the image will appear blurred and double. That is the nature of the design. 9 feet or 3 metres is considered quite close to focus a binocular and is usually for a model designed to do this such as a roof prism where the objective lens and the eye lenses are inline. A specialty binocular such as the Pentax Papilo will close focus to 50 centimeters. It has been designed so that the objective (large lenses) lenses converge.

Take into account when focusing that binoculars are also designed to compensate for differences in each eye. One of the eyepieces either right or left will adjust seperately. For binoculars with a center focus ring. First focus using the center ring with one eye covered. The eye that should be covered is the one that doesn't have the adjusting eyepiece. When the image is clear close the eye you have just used and leave the center focus alone. Focusing on the same spot look through the eyepiece that adjusts and turn the eyepiece ring until the image is clear. Now all you have to do is focus using the center ring only as the binoculars are adjusted for each eye.

Some binoculars do not have a center focus and each eye will adjust seperately.

Jul 29, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Binoculers do not appear to be focussing properly.


Binox have a prism in each barrel to invert the image. When dropped or banged around the prisms may move in their mounts creating the problem you present. I have opened binox and reset the prism effecting a correction, but IF you unit is nitrogen filled you will be losing that anti-fogging benefit. If you choose to open your pair, check for movement in each prism, neither should be loose. Once you find the original proper placement, a drop of crazy glue does wonders - just a drop on one edge.

Jul 12, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

When i look thru eyepiece everything leans to one side


In space there is no up down right or left-- all astronomical telescopes show land objects upside down-- you can buy an erecting prism to use for terrestial viewing here--

http://www.telescope.com/control/product/~category_id=diagonals/~pcategory=accessories/~product_id=08787

Mar 29, 2009 | Optics

3 Answers

78-8831


If you dont have any experience with telescopes, I suggest trying it first in daytime, since daytime objects are much better for getting experience. Also, start with the lowest power eyepiece, the one with the largest lens. Start by looking towards something pretty big, like a car or a house, and it needs to be some distance away to even have a chance to get a focus. If your target is closer than about 1/4 mile, you should add the right angle eyepiece attachment to allow you to focus in on closer objects.

When you are finally set up with the low power eyepiece, and have a good big target in the daytime, start looking thru the telescope while turning the knob thru the entire range. At some point of knob turning, you should see some image appear in the eyepiece..Turn the knob slowly to focus it clearly.

And this is for the shaky tripod. If you can hang a book under the middle of the tripod, the added weight will help stabilize the telescope, and you should be able to see a little better, without so much motion at the slightest touch.

After you look at the first car or house, you can see how careful you have to be to use the telescope, and you can start to look at other objects. When you move to the higher power eyepieces, it will be even more critical in getting it both aimed and focused. If its off by just a few degrees, you wont see what you are looking for.

When you start nightime viewing, start with the largest object in the sky, the moon. Its the same process as daytime, except the eyepiece mechanism will have to be adjusted a little closer to the main body of the telescope.

Viewing planets and stars will be the ultimate test. Stars and planets are harder to see, since they are small, and hard to see unless they are in focus. When you can see those views, you have passed the telescope test. Its a matter of careful aim, and having the telescope focus set close to the point where you can see objects that are VERY FAR AWAY. If you are able to focus on the moon, you will be fairly close to being able to focus on the planets. The hardest part is actually getting the planet in the view of the telescope, in other words, aiming it.

The last item that can really mess up the view is a fogged up lens. Usually this happens in the summer when the scope has been in the air-conditioned room, and then it fogs up when taken outside. The solution for this is to let the telescope sit outside for 20 minutes, so the fogged lenses can clear. By the way, the same fogging may happen when you bring the telescope inside during the winter.

I hope this helps you eventually get a clear view of some amazing views in the sky. Your final exam is to take a look at the moon, the rings of Saturn, and the moons of Jupiter, some time in the near future. Have Fun!

Dec 26, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

Focus with erector eyepiece on


Some eyepieces cannot come to focus in certain telescopes-- try a different eyepiece.

Sep 02, 2007 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9565 (120 x 60mm)...

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