Question about Hamilton Beach 31197 120 Watts Toaster Oven with Convection Cooking

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How can I fix the fan in a Hamilton Beach 31197C oven which is vibrating. I can push on the end of the shaft and it stops vibrating. Ive tried WD40 on the winding to see if it's a lube problem, and it quieted for a bit, so would penetrating oil work if I went and bought some. Is this ok to use oil for an oven?

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You really need to replace the fan. This motor uses cheap sleeve bearings and you will only cause a problem (maybe burn the house down) trying to spray lube from the interior which I assume is what you are doing.

This is not an easy repair. I replaced mine which had an open winding. HB tried to make this unit so it could NOT be repaired, but of course it can be if you want to spend the time. The motor is part of a metal duct assy which also holds the rotisserie motor. It is RIVETED to the interior wall of the oven. The fan uses a DUAL shaft C-Frame shaded pole 120 VAC ~ 3000 RPM ~ .5 amp motor which is not very common, with 2 separate axial type metal blade sets. The oven door also develops a problem over time that keeps it from staying closed. The thermo on all these units is also inaccurate as the "sensor" is simply a metal plate screwed to the top right area of the oven interior. When I replaced my fan I also put in a new REAL oven thermo with a 12" sensing bulb which I mounted inside the oven as it should be. It took some searching to find these two parts. You can also repair the door mechanism at the same time and give yourself a couple more years until you have to do it again. I have all more and can post images if you want to tackle this. I did because the oven is large and the replacement model (31100 for $69 at Wal-Mart) has 1.5" less height and it uses the SAME parts with the same design flaw for the thermo. The retail cost on the parts for this job are ~$160, but I got mine for $15 total. I paid $48 for this oven years ago at Sams.

How can I fix the fan in a Hamilton Beach 31197C - dd28a515-169d-4e41-b89d-a15e4e231847.jpg

Posted on Jun 16, 2012

  • 18 more comments 
  • Randal J Sheppard Jun 18, 2012

    HankR - It's time to fix this thing, the fan doesn't work at all now. I would definately appreciate the instructions and photos you offer on changing the motor/fan assembly, and the thermo. Also I would appreciate advice on how to get parts for the better price you mentioned. Thank you.

  • HankR Jun 19, 2012

    First you need to make sure you really want to tackle this and if you may have other problems that would make it more costly to repair. If you have not already done so, remove all the phillips head screws on the plastic bottom pieces (be careful to support or tape the door closed before flipping as this thing is easy to damage) and then remove the remaining screws holding the black exterior shell and slide it off being careful not to damage any of the wiring or components when removing. Now you can see what you are up against on the right side. Take a good high rez image of this side and all its components as well a a shot of the other side with the series wiring between the elements and the door mechanism and post those. It is possible you may have something different or you may have other problems that simply will be almost impossible to repair. Also, remember that eventually the elements will burn out and HB will not sell you replacements, so this will mean more work in the future. Very few people would have even gone to the lengths I have on this, but I am a born tinkerer and also wanted a large toaster over that worked as I wanted it to. If you already have the motor out, send me an image of the bottom of the motor where the part number should be stamped on the bottom of the windings. If you don't have it out yet, wait until I see the image of the entire right side before trying to remove it. If you don't want to continue, I will certainly understand. It may be a few days before I can get back to you with another answer as I am starting a new business project today that will require mucho time and little sleep. Good luck.

  • Tony Barone
    Tony Barone Jan 20, 2014

    HankR I would love to see your photos, my fan is dying and my tempature has problems. But I do like this oven for the size of it. Where is the thermocoupling?

  • HankR Jan 22, 2014

    Sorry I have been so swamped, the toaster oven I was going to use to post a video of my repair work on is still just a pile of parts. I may have forgotten how it goes back together when I finally get around to it :). I assume by thermocoupling you mean the sensing bulb for the thermostat. There isn't one, which is why these are so inaccurate. If you take off the outside by removing all the screws you will see the fine 50 cent thermo on the top right. The "sensing element" is literally just the metal side of the oven. The tiny thermo is screwed to the inside wall just inside on the top right. They actually smeared some heat sink paste on there and screwed it on so those two screws mark the point of the thermo "sensor" explaining why it is always inaccurate. You need to find a new real thermo as I explained in past posts and you will have to rebuild the fan motor if you can't find an exact replacement, which you won't unless you want to order at least 1000+ from China for around $1 each as HB does. This motor is a pain because it is riveted in and so must be drilled out to free it, but all motors are rebuildable if you want to take the time and effort. You can replace or repair the cheap sleeve bearings if it is turning slow or making noise and you can get to the windings and rewind if open or shorted and/or replace the 350 degree F (as I recall) thermal limiter embedded in the windings. Also the hinged door assembly eventually gives out on these and that can be corrected by repairing the cam and/or spring you will find on the left side. In case you find all this daunting or not worth it, they are still making a new version of this for around $69 that is the same width and depth, but is a couple inches shorter in height. Unbelievably they are STILL using the exact same parts on this model which they get in China for almost nothing. SAME CHEAP MOTOR, THERMO AND DOOR CONTROL ASSEMBLY! Some day if I don't kick off first I WILL post a video of the complete repair. First find a real oven thermo and don't pay too much for it.. This may take awhile. eBay and surplus stores are the best place to look. Full retail on a real oven thermo can be over $100. I bought a box of a dozen as surplus, saved out two and sold the rest on eBay for a small profit. I got an average of $20 each for these and I only paid about $10 each buying the whole box. They were 15 year old GE thermos but brand new still in the original shrink wrap. Unless you are a patient tinkerer, you may want to pick up that new model, but you will still be stuck with a bad thermo and the fan motor and door will give out after awhile. Ironically the most reliable moving part in the thing is the rotisserie motor which I can't imagine anyone actually using. They clearly tried to put together an all in one system as a sales ploy.

  • Tony Barone Jan 27, 2014

    Thanks for responding, If I over heated the thing would it kill the convection fan? Would you believe it quit today.. But Bet I had it hot, can I bypass the thermal limiter? Or does it reset?

  • Tony Barone Jan 27, 2014

    If I open the side of the Toaster oven and create room are there better convetion fan motors. I am not worried about the cooling fan now as much. Just the convection side. I have permently opened an access panel on the fan side. I bought a new 31197 on amazon and using my old one now for roasting coffee. So now when used it is an outside oven and only used under my supervision.

  • Tony Barone Jan 27, 2014

    By the way I wan to thank you Hank for all your help. So little info around and you seem to more than anyone on the web.

  • Tony Barone Jan 27, 2014

    I wish I could edit my posts

  • HankR Jan 28, 2014

    WELL... If you have the thing out in the open and want a better motor almost anything would do. You don't even need a C-Frame or axial fan blades. You could get a radial/centrifugal type blower assembly and put some major air movement through there like a true convection oven. If you picked up a new one, I assume you paid around $70 or so, the cost of the new model which as I stated is no better or maybe worse as it is a bit smaller than the original, and if you don't need an accurate thermo (and you don't have that with the new one anyway) you could spend $30 or so on just a good blower. I am just a natural tinkerer and also hate to throw out stuff that can be fixed/improved with some labor and a few bucks, but for the cost of a really good motor/blower assy., and a thermo, you could probably get a small batch coffee bean roaster. If you just want another C-Frame, you already have the old one to use as a guide and it won't have to fit perfectly and you don't want the dual shaft, so you can get those easily. As for the limiter, it is a one time deal. When the element melts, that's it. They have it very lightly soldered in series with the windings. You have to carefully snip it out and using heat sink clamps, solder or at least tightly crimp in another one. First, of course make sure the circuit is actually open. If open, it could be the limiter or the windings or both, but probably the limiter if you have kept it cranked way up for long periods of time. It you want to jump it, that is your business, but I would not recommend it, even though one would think the fire danger on this uninsulated heat monger would not come from a tiny C-Frame motor overheating. I never defeat fire protection schemes in any case, though this is not like putting a penny under an old house fuse :).

  • Tony Barone Jan 28, 2014

    Hank I want to thank you again for your help. I believe my old machine and my new one are both HB 31197R models so I think they are nearly identical other than year made. I love to build and rework things, though in the past I spent time reassembling Russian trainer jets I bought in Bulgaria. I would love to swap out to a stronger fan motor. A blower would work great I am just not sure what parts are generally available or how to plumb the hot air to the fan. Are there insulated hoses available on a small scale with mounting brackets? For that matter the motor that operates the rotisserie would for my purpose be much better if it turned at a higher rpm. I am not sure but I am guessing this one is about 6-10 rpms, I would be better off faster say 30 rpms. I again am just not sure what options exist in the common market. Seems like there are lots of C-Frame motors, by the way I would not have known to look up C-Frame but it made a big difference in my search and tons of those at no real cost. Found blower fans in the 24-36 dollar range it seems like.

  • Tony Barone Jan 28, 2014

    With the fan working I have a wonderful coffee roaster that I can do up to 2lbs of green coffee at a time. Most of the retail rosters I have found are very limited in batch size most are a half pound or less. The 2 pound machines are several thousand dollars or more. This has been a fun project pushing this machine along, and your help is greatly appreciated.

  • Tony Barone Jan 28, 2014

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/TYD50-Synchronou... is this the type of motor HB uses for their rotisserie?

  • HankR Jan 29, 2014

    Looks very close, but what are using the rotisserie motor for in a coffee bean roaster. The C-Frame convection motor is around 3000 RPM but has so little power that it moves very little air. You can get flexible all aluminum duct that you could attach to the outlet of a radial blower if you wanted to remotely mount the thing, but then you would have to also duct the return air. You could go all out and get a blower from a real convection oven and that would take heat to 500+ degrees without melting or overheating. There are also blowers made for fan forced furnace vent applications that can take the heat right off a gas furnace burner, but with both of these you are talking more than the new overn cost but far less than thousands, You must really go through the coffee!! Cuisinart makes a high dollar small convection oven that moves more air. I think I saw one at Williams Sonoma for $200 - $300. You might be able to order just a replacement blower assy, for this thing even though Cuisinart now makes almost everything in China, so replacement parts are probably not available. Every company just wants you to get a year or two of service (make it through the warranty period) and then off to the dump and get the latest model. Really bugs me. I have a 27 year old truck with 300,000

  • HankR Jan 29, 2014

    fixya cut me off - too verbose I guess - anyway resuming - 300,000+ miles and I still have the original heater hoses, wheel bearings and many more parts, PLUS I still have 175 lbs. (factory new compression) on all 4 cylinders at 28 MPG city and 30 HWY. Nissan stopped making this engine and most of the other parts because they were too reliable!! I guess I was born too latre or too early one.

  • Tony Barone
    Tony Barone Jan 29, 2014

    Sounds like a solid truck, same heater hoses is a wonder, and wheel bearings wow. I have a company car, and my last was a Tahoe we held it a bit longer than normal because of the economy, I have an expedition now. But I had 130,000 miles on it and still had the same brake pads and rotors since it was brand new and they still had plenty of life on them when we sold it. My 87 mustang I changed brake pads every 10-12,000 miles. I could do the front brakes on that car in my sleep.

  • Tony Barone Jan 29, 2014

    The reason for the rotisserie I have a mesh drum roaster that fits on the rotisserie bar, it keeps the beans moving so not to burn. I looked at the current little motor and its 3 to 2 1/2 rpm and I got one I like at 15-18rpm. It seems to be connected with a cotter pin. I have not drilled the pop rivets out yet. Do you remember the length and diameter of the shaft on the c-frame. With the side cut out I now I figure it will get much more air to keep the temp down so I think it is fine. I saw some C-Frames with ball bearings so I think at this point it is the easiest until I come across a better convection option.

  • HankR Jan 31, 2014

    Here's a view of the motor parts with the drill bit and screws you need to put in a new one. I seem to have misplaced the windings somewhere?! I have had this thing in a pile of parts for well over a year. in any case this will give you all you need about dimensions.

  • HankR Jan 31, 2014

    WELL... It took my 500K detailed image and ruined it. I thought there would be a link to my original upload. If you need the original, let me know.

  • Tony Barone
    Tony Barone Jan 31, 2014

    I think it is a helpfull photo can you email it to me at KingDL1st@yahoo.com. I think I can get a bit more scale off a larger photo

  • HankR Feb 01, 2014

    Sent a decent rez image 1+ MB as long as Google or Yahoo does not reduce it. You can zoom in and clearly see the dimensions of each part of the motor using the rule across the top.

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It seems to be a common occurrence with this type of toaster oven.
Do not use oil, that could give the possibility of it setting on fire or shorting out. If you must, try lubing it with over types of non-flammable liquids and tools.
I just want to make sure you are save when trying to handle this.
Another possibility is to return it and ask for a new one because of the defect.

Posted on Mar 12, 2011

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