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Had a HOMC42UC main electric panel installed. Installer did not ground (wire is just loose). Where do i connect? He connected circuit breaker ground wires to neutral bar. Do I need to get a ground bar and install. Can I install more than one in box since I have space for 42 breakers. If so, do I just screw them into back of panel or do I have to run ground wire to each.

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The neutral bar can be used as the ground bar as well. I prefer to have separate ones, and it depends on the state. In the main panel the ground and neutral are usually connected, but in auxillary panels they are not. So in an auxillary panel you connect them (separate neutral and ground bars) to those in the main panel, by wires.

Posted on Mar 12, 2011

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House wiring


TAKE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN WORKING ON LIVE WIRES!
THIS WORK SHOULD BE PERFORMED BY TRAINED ELECTRICIAN.
REMOVE BREAKER FROM BACK OF PANEL & INSPECT FOR LOOSE AND WORN CONNECTIONS THAT CAUSE BURNS AND MELTED METAL CONNECTORS.

Jan 27, 2015 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

What is the difference between a ground wire and a neutral wire?


Here are links to help, then add a comment:
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Inside-Main-Breaker-Box-12.jpg
rrrrrrrrrrrr
http://waterheatertimer.org/See-inside-main-breaker-box.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/Color-codewire.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T104
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Test-wires-for-voltage-1-600.jpg
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/T104-wire-from-breaker-600.jpg
Always stand on dry boards and never directly on ground when testing live electricity. Do no lean into or touch anything made of metal. Tape wood sticks to tester leads.
240Volt circuit does not use neutral wire. Neutral is used to complete circuit for 120Volt... and that is only function for neutral.
Neutral and ground wires connect back to same wire coming in from the electric company transformer. So in a sense, neutral and ground are same.
However both neutral and ground wires connect to separate busbars inside the breaker box. And then both those busbars are bonded together or joined together ... so ground and neutral become the same thing inside breaker box.
For national electric code, the ground wire runs to each fixture, outlet, motor, appliance etc. The ground wire is essential for safety.
Absolutely the ground wire must connect to motor in case the motor housing becomes electrified after the motor overheats etc.
The ground wire carries no voltage and is safe to touch ... but don't test that theory in event there is funky off-code wiring on premises.
Please add a comment May 2013 for followup, and if you need specific wiring diagram... attach image of your situation

May 28, 2013 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Need to install a 2pole 20 amp gfci breaker in an ite bq panel. what are my options as I don't think they make this breaker in type bq?


Hi Pauline, I'm an electrician and can help you with this problem.

The only breakers that are permitted to be installed in any circuit breaker panel are listed inside the door on the label. Introducing any other type or brand is a fire hazard and a code violation. The national electrical code is very clear on this.

If you need to provide a GFCI protected circuit from this panel, you'll probably need to install a smaller panel from this panel - called "sub-panel" of a brand and type that will accept a GFCI circuit breaker. This is done by purchasing a 2P20A GFCI breaker and a smaller circuit capacity / ampacity panel rated for the same voltage as the main panel. You'll also need a ground terminal strip for this panel, too. A 60A main lug panel with 8 or more circuits type panel might be a good place to start. Purchase a 2P circuit breaker with an ampacity no greater than the sub panel is rated at - in my example - a 2P60A would be right. You may use a smaller breaker (2P40A or 2P50A) if you wish - but none greater. Mount the sub panel in a location near the main panel. Remove and discard the bonding screw or lug (if provided and installed already) that may connect the neutral bar and threaded into the panel enclosure. Install the ground terminal strip you purchased separately into the threaded holes provided for it inside the panel enclosure. Install the Ground symbol sticker next to this bar. Run a 4 conductor cable, pipe & wire, etc. feeder sized for 60A based on the location, temperature, etc. between the main panel and the main lug panel. Terminate the cable the sub panel end as follows: black & red or "hot" wires into the the lugs that are connected to the bus bars, white or "neutral" to the neutral bar and the bare or green "ground" wire into the ground terminal strip you installed previously.

Next terminate the other end of the cable. Power off the main panel completely. Terminate the white neutral and the bare or green cable in the neutral bar in separate terminals. Install only one wire per terminal - do not "double up" wires under a single screw. If there is a separate strip for neutral and separate strip for ground - maintain neutral wires to neutral strip and ground wires to ground strip. Also, do not intermix ground and neutral wires in the others terminal strips! Install the 2P60A breaker in an unused space in the main panel. Connect the two hot wires to the breaker terminals. If using aluminum wires, be sure to clean and apply oxide inhibitor to stripped ends of the wires.

Now, you should have a smaller panel with 8 or more empty spaces for circuit breakers that will become live when the 2P60A breaker is in the main panel is turned on. With it still off, install the 2P20A GFCI breaker in the new sub panel. Run your circuit(s) to this panel. Connect them as usual - but any neutral and ground wires installed must be terminated in their respective terminal strips. As mentioned above, never install them in the others strip.

If installing in a 3 phase environment - you may wish to install a 3 phase sub panel so that 3 phase loads can be connected to it. This will require a 3P60A breaker and 5 wires instead of 4 wires to be run between the two panels. The additional wire would be a hot and blue in color for a 240/208/120 panel.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Apr 26, 2012 | Siemens /ite Bq Circuit Breaker Bq3b090 3p...

1 Answer

Wiring diagram for three phase power with two 200 amp service boxes inside building


This work requires a license (or qualified person) everywhere that the National Electrical Code is enforced.

If you're asking how to wire a single phase 200 amp panel from a larger, 3 phase panel of the same voltage - ONE way is to install a 2 pole - 200 amp breaker into the 3 phase panel. Provide 4 correctly sized conductors with the correct insulation in a cable or conduit between the 3 phase panel and the 200 amp single phase panel. Two of these conductors should be black and red (for 120/208 volt system) and connect to the 2 pole - 200 amp circuit breaker terminals, the third should be white and connected to the neutral bus bar. The forth should be green and is connected to the neutral bus bar as well but *only if* it is "service equipment" If it is a "main or sub panel", the green wire should be connected to the ground bus bar. The other end of the conductors should be terminated in a "main lug only" 200 amp panel. The back and red connect to "line 1" and "line 2" bus lugs, the white to the neutral bus bar that is NOT electrically connected to the panel enclosure (do not install the screw or strap between the bar and enclosure). The green must be connected by installing a separate bar that is securely fastened both mechanically and electrically to the enclosure for ground connections.

There is a great deal going on here - and plenty of variables that can change how to do this work, safely and correctly. This is an example of just ONE of many different ways to do the work for a particular installation. There is no one way that works for all situations. If your situation does not support this method - you will have an unsafe installation and subject the building and people in it to a dangerous fire / safety hazard.

Please, consult a licensed electrician before attempting this work.

Nov 17, 2011 | Square D Qo 200 Amp 40 Circuit Indoor...

2 Answers

My Sylvania - ground fault 15 amp breaker (32740) is tripping with minutes of reseting. It is for 3 washrooms & hallway & is 30 years old .....does or can it loose its life span? What is the cost...


A circuit breaker can go bad, but usually not in the way that you describe. That's not to say that it can't happen, but just not typical. GTE Sylvania breakers were once popular - I installed quite a few GTE / Sylvania electrical panels in homes in the late 80's. You may have trouble finding replacements; do not put an breaker that "fits" into the panel, unless the breaker is designed for use in the panel you have.

The first thing to do is determine the source of the problem. The breaker will trip, but not indicate if it was the result of a heavy electrical load or a ground fault condition. A 15 amp circuit breaker is designed to carry up to 12 amps continuously. The greater the load, the more quickly it will trip. it may carry a 14.5 amp load for several minutes to an hour before tripping, and a 20 amp load may be carried a second or two. GFI breakers are designed to carry 5 thousandths (.005) of an amp (or 5 milliamps) to ground, or the 12+ amps to neutral before they trip.

The way I would attack the problem is to install a new GFI outlet in front of the old wiring, by "inserting it" between the panel and the other plugs and lights, switches, etc on that circuit. The GFI outlet will provide the same GFI protection that the circuit breaker provided at a fraction of the cost.

Turn off the old GFI breaker, and remove it completely. Install a new, standard (non-GFI) single pole 15 amp circuit breaker in its place. Completely remove from the panel the cable that the old GFI breaker fed. Buy a new electrical outlet box (surface or flush mount as desired) that is large enough and deep enough for a GFI plug and 2 cables (if surface mount, use a 4" square deep box and appropriate cover - or if flush mounting use a deep plastic / fiber single gang box). It will be installed in a place close to the panel, but where the old cable will be able to reach inside. Bring the old cable removed from the panel into the new box. Run a new cable that has the same number and size wires from the panel into the new box, too. Connect the circuit neutral and circuit ground to the neutral and ground bars in the panel (they are probably the same bar) and the hot wire to the circuit breaker. make sure that the circuit breaker is OFF. Twist the two ground wires together and combine an 8 inch length of bare or green insulated wire with them in a wirenut.

Next, wire a new GFI plug in the new box. Connect the green wire from the wirenut to the green terminal of the GFI outlet.

Connect the plug's LINE terminals to the neutral and hot wires in the cable that you ran from the panel to the outlet box.

Now, connect the GFI plug's LOAD terminals to the neutral and hot wires in the cable that you removed from the panel and reinstalled into the new outlet box.

Secure the GFI outlet into the box and install the cover. Cover the electrical panel.

Power up and test. if the GFI trips, there's a ground fault in the circuit. If the circuit breaker trips, the circuit is overloaded.

Jun 13, 2011 | Your One Source Qo Single Pole Ground...

1 Answer

I installed the above gfci with the pigtail side adjacent to the neutral bar, contrary to intructions. The gfci trips immediately when power is turned on the gfci is switched on. What could be wrong and...


1. Did you connect the neutral wire (white) from the breaker to the neutral bar?
2. Did you connect the circuit neutral wire (white) to the circuit breaker. If there is a neutral load the load MUST be connected to the breaker no to the panel neutral bar.
3. If this is a 50A load, what is the appliance connected to the circuit? If it is a range, quite often the newer ranges have a ground wire connected to the burner mount. A small current leakage in the element can trip the GFCI. Check each element (with power off) from the wiring terminals to ground with an ohm meter.

Oct 22, 2010 | Siemens 50 Amp Ground Fault Circuit...

2 Answers

How do I run from a 100 amp main panel to a 60 amp subpanel, 125 from my house to the garage


See 60 Amp sub-panel image

Above image shows drawing of 60Amp sub-panel located next to main panel. Drawing shows #6 wire... 125' distance to garage calls for #4 wire. I ran #4 to my barn and have no problems.

Give thought to how many new breakers you want at garage.
See photo of subpanel that holds three 240V breakers

Using drawing as a guide. Replace existing 240Volt breaker with new 60 Amp breaker. Two hot wires connect to new 60 Amp breaker. Neutral connects to neutral busbar.

More space: You can free up space in main breaker box using a tandem breaker. Or by doubling up 2 lightly used 120V circuits onto one breaker. Do not double-up on 240 Breakers

Conduit: You want PVC conduit large enough to fit three #4 wires. Bigger conduit is easier to pull wires ... and maybe later ethernet wire, or alarm wire etc.

Ground wire: You can put a ground rod at garage and run #6 bare copper between sub-panel neutral-busbar and ground rod. Attach ground wire firmly with grounding clamp.

I want you to check with local electrical supply for exact code in your area concerning conduit requirements, grounding, and wire size. Tighten all lugs very tight against wire.

Oct 03, 2010 | Siemens 100 Amp Main Breaker Renovation...

2 Answers

Hello. I just installed a GE Combination Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter and it keeps tripping, seemingly for no reason as when it trips there isn't much of a load on it. This is the second one of these I...


AFCI's can be a real pain, as I'm sure you know.

First, no offense, but check to see if the AFCI is wired correctly. The (usually coiled) white wire that is permanently attached to the breaker connects to the neutral bus bar in the electric panel. The white wire that goes out to the circuit is attached to the "white" (or "neutral") terminal _on_ the breaker. That is _very_ important. The hot wire
that goes out to the circuit is attached to "hot" terminal on the breaker. The bare equipment grounding wire that goes out to the circuit is also connected to the neutral bus bar (IF this is the MAIN electric service panel) If it is a sub-panel, the neutral bar should be isolated from the equipment grounding bar.

Second, unplug everything, turn off all lights, and remove any smoke detectors on the circuit, then see if the breaker holds. If it holds, plug things back in one by one until something trips the breaker.

Remember that if there are smoke detectors on the circuit that smokes are usually interconnected (if one goes off, they all go off). So you will have to pull other smokes in other rooms too.

If it doesn't hold, read on.

Determine which outlets and lights, including smoke detectors are on the circuit. The outlet closest to the electric panel is probably the first outlet. Go to the approximate 1/2 way point in the circuit, pull out the receptacle, take note how it is wired, then remove all the wires from the receptacle and separate them so they aren't touching anything, including the bare equipment ground wires. You don't want _any_ wires feeding downstream. This means you will probably have to remake the equipment grounding wires connection with a wire nut when done.

Turn on the breaker and see if it holds. If it doesn't hold, then go 1/2 way upstream and repeat. If it holds, then go 1/2 way downstream. And so on.

Also, remember that the bare equipment grounding wires and the white neutral wires are ONLY bonded together ONCE at the MAIN electric panel. They should never be connected together after they leave the MAIN electric panel, so look for that too.

Good luck.

Sep 16, 2010 | General Electric G.E. Arc Fault Breaker

1 Answer

I am installing a sub panel in a detached building from my house. Which is 100 ft away. I plan to have four separate circuits. One that will service a ceiling fan and 3 for plug ins that will only run a TV...


You could use 6/3 with ground. You must take an equipment ground conductor along with your current carrying conductors. Still drive a ground rod at the building, and add a seperate ground bar in the sub panel. Connect your equipment grounding conductor from main building along with the equipment grouding conductor to the ground rod. Do not bond the neutral in the sub panel to ground. Be aware you will still have some voltage drop, so a 220V air conditioner might be better.

Sep 10, 2010 | General Electric GE ELECTRICAL TQD22200X2...

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Siemens Main Breaker 125 Amp gets warm and trips


sounds like a loose connection ,or possibly a weak main breaker.

Jul 14, 2009 | Siemens /ITE 100Amp 2-pole molded circuit...

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