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Where to purchase the repromaster camera's agfa film, negative and chemical

Dear sir,

Can you kindly to lead me where to buy the necessary developer and copy proof film and negative.
my e mail sag@pd.jaring.my
Thanks

regards

Posted by on

4 Suggested Answers

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SOURCE: Agfa Gevaert Repromaster 310 Helioprint

try to contact www.purup-eskofot.com/ as I beleive they bourght the remains of Helioprint years ago.

Nils - old management member of Heliporint AS

Posted on Mar 25, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Agfa Gevaert Repromaster 310 Helioprint

I would rather try to contact Mr. Jack Biront at Agfa Gevaert in Mortsel, Belgium, Phone +32 3 444 2111 .
Knud - Also an old management member of Helioprint AS

Posted on May 06, 2008

  • 35 Answers

SOURCE: Huge difference in film scanning quality

For ARCHIVAL quality scans, there is no comparison. The Nikon wins hands-down. For making small prints and web sharing, either will work fine.

Posted on Aug 16, 2009

skipcool83
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Agfa snapscan 1212u cathode lamp replacement.

use agfa photolook With the 1212U and everything will work fine

Posted on Apr 30, 2012

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2 Answers

Why is film clear after developing? Using bulk load Tmaxx 400


Sounds like the camera isn't working. It would appear the shutter doesn't function because you have no images at all. I would open up the camera and check this. (Empty of film of course).

Feb 25, 2015 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

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Step by step guide for rolling a film reel for developing


Rolling film on a metal reel can be very challenging and for years I avoided using these reels in favor of the plastic ones with the large lip for leading the negative around the reel. Over the last year or so I have been working on getting around this fear of not being able to roll the film.

The first and most important thing that you have to make sure is that when you cut off the "L" shaped piece make sure that you cut the film between the sprocket holes. Those first few holes are crucial for the ability to successfully loading the film on to the reel.

On the center post of the reel there are two very small hooks that you want the negative to hook on to using those sprocket holes. These hooks work to make sure that the film stays put while you roll and throughout the development process.

Once the film is hooked on you are going to slowly turn the reel around and around holding the unrolled film on the sides. Make sure to hold on the sides because you don't want your fingers to scratch the very sensitive negative.

If you practice in the light with dead rolls of film you can check if you rolled well by holding up the roll and looking though. If you can see between the rounds of film then you have done a good job. It is important that the film be rolled smoothly because if parts are touching then the chemicals can't get in and the film will not develop properly. Once you have mastered rolling this way in the light take some time to roll a dead roll of film in the dark before you get to the real stuff (no pun intended).

on Oct 03, 2013 | Photography

1 Answer

Dear sirs,went to alaska & took pictures with reg.camera,how do I transfer them to the computer?thank you bill johnson.


When you get them developed ask for the cd option.

Most film developers offer the photos on cd option from regular film for a small extra cost.

If you have already had them developed, you can take the negatives back to the developer, and they can still do the cd transfer.

Otherwise you will need a scanner to put your pictures on your computer. The scanners cost $60 and up, and take hours of your time,

Good Luck!

Jan 30, 2010 | Photography

1 Answer

Canon Rebel 35mm - Line down centre


This looks as if the negative has been scratched by the minilab processor. It could be scratched in tha camera but with this camera there are only two places this could happen resulting in this kind of scratch.

One is the film cassette itself, the other is the take-up spool, where the film is wound onto itself. However this would not be likley to create a scratch affecting more than one or two negs.

Colour film has a built in orange filter which compensates for the excess sensitivity of colour papers to blue. If this is scratched away, then more blue get's through which prints yellow.

The processing machine uses sqeegee's to prevent carry-over of chenicals form one bath to another, and damage or contaminaton of any one of these can scratch the negative. This is much more likely during processing, as the emulsion is softer when wet.

Films usually have a protective anti-scratch layer, but the protection is not 100%. Also develelped emulsion is generally harder than undeveloped as the last development stage often contains chemical hardeners designed to give extra protection to the negative.

The reason it may not show on all the prints is simply that these days many colour film is printed by digital scanning. Many scanners can detect scratches by viewing the negative in infrared light. Photographic dyes are transparent to infrared in order to reduce heat absorption from enlarger lamps, so there should be no image visible in infrared, anything that is must be dust or a scratch. The image can them be processed to compensate for the scrathes making them virtually undetectable.

A thin scratch may be filled in by using pixesl just either side of the scratch to fill the scratch in. With a wider scratch, if there is some residual image then the software can use that and nearby unscratched areas as a guide to make an acceptable guess as to what was supposed to be there. If the scratch is too wide and too deep it will just give up. A bodged attempt may end-up worse than the scratch. (Often a skilled touch up artist can make it dissapear, but machines on their own are not that smart yet.)

So the good news is that your camera is unlikely to be at fault.

If this shows on one film or a batch of films processed at the same time, take them back to the processor. (I have done this before and been paid a fair amount of compensation. If they printed them at the same time it should be obvious that the negs were scratched before you took them home.)

On the other hand if this is showing on films processed at the same place over a period of time then don't use them again.

If this is happening no matter where you get the film developed, then you might need to check you camera!

Jan 19, 2009 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Pictures


It's quite complicated to explain in detail, and there are a number of different processes, but I can start by saying how the essential chemistry of B&W processing works.

A film emulsion contains tiny crystals of a silver halide (Silver chloride, bromide etc.) contained in a layer of gelatin, coated on a plastic backing. Silver halides are sensitive to light.

There are other layers such as an anti-reflection layer behind the light sensitive layer to prevent light being scattered back to produce a 'halo' around bright areas, (Anti-halation layer) and a scratch resistant layer on the front.

Additionally dye chemicals are added which enhance the halides sensitivity to red light, to which otherwise it would be insensitive. These are known as dye sensitisers.

Only imprefections in the crystals are actually sensitive, as these contain silver ions which are not fully bound to the halogen. When a photon interacts with the crystal near the sensitve site an electron is released which can reduce the ion to a single atom of silver.

These single atoms ar enot enough to produce a visible image, but comprise a latent image within the emulsion. In order to make the latent image visible we must amplify the latent image in some way. This is done chemically by a process known as development.

There are a number of chemicals formulations which can be used as developers (including urine!), but all are chemical reducing agents. (Opposite of oxidising agents.) These convert the silver halide to metallic silver.

It so happens that for many reducing agents metallic silver acts as a catalyst, so where there is silver the reaction proceeds faster than where there is not. Of course as more silver is produced the greater the catalytic action, so the develoment process accellerated as it progesses.

This forms clumps of silver around the original silver atoms. These clumps consist of very small grains of silver, finer than any powder and these appear black. These form a negative image. (Black where light fell on the film.)

(These tiny grains are not what photgraphers refer to as 'grain'. In fact the 'grain' in a photograph is more to do with the distribution of development sites, and the random nature of the arrival of individual photons.)

Most developers are realtively benign chemicals but some are toxic and carcinogenic. These are not used much these days but are still availble.

Unfortunatley this is quite a slow process, and there is a tendency to also reduce unexposed halides somewhat. This produces an overall 'fog' to the immage. To minimise this and speed the process up an accellerator is usally added.

Accellerators are alkalis. Some formulas use quite strong alkalis like sodium hydroxide, but others use rather innoccuos substances like borax.

Development continues until the developing chemical is removed or the chemicals are exhausted. If the film is developed too much than the silver clumps begin to overlap and you get a completly black area. Further development does not make those areas any blacker even if more silver is produced!


This process is of course conducted entirely in darkness.

Most formulations use both developer and acellerator together, but sometimes these are used separatley to give better controll of the negative density. Here the emulsion is soaked in the developer, and transferred to the accellerator bath. This limits the amount of developer in the negative so heavily exposed areas do not develop as much. This allow a scene with a wider range of brightness to be recorded.

(Note that the film itself can record a much wider range in the latent image, than can be developed.)

Normally development is stopped by immersing the film in an acidic bath, which reacts with the accellerator as well as washing away developer.

The anti-halation layer dyes are usually washed out during develpment.

Of course this still leaves undeveloped silver halides in the emulsion. These are removed by fixing the image.

This is necesary for two reasons. First in a film the halide crystals have a whilte milky appearance. You need light to shine through a film duing enlargement, so that's no good. Alxo the halide will eventually turn black on exposure to light.

Fixing the image usually is a matter of washing the negative in a soultion of sodium thiosuphate. (Comonly called 'hypo'.) Silver halides are only very poorly soluble in water, but sodium thiosulhpates affinity for soft metal ions overcomes this reaction with the silver, to produce sodium halide. If this is silver chloride you get salt!)

To get a print, you expose paper treated on one surface with an emulsion, to a projected image of the enlarger and develop that in a similar way.

So there you have it. Color is a bit more complicated involving layer with different sesitivity to colored light, and dyes which are produced by the action of delvelopers.

For more details start with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photography

Jan 13, 2009 | Fuji Endeavor 200ix Zoom APS Point and...

1 Answer

2 rolls out of a 3-pack ruined.


I would suggest you buy an off-brand roll of 12 or 24 exposures. Run it through the camera taking snaps of anything -- but make sure you vary the lighting, ISO, shutter speed, aperture, etc. as you snap the pics. Don't worry too much about composition. This roll is a quick test, NOT for photos to keep.

Have the film developed and then follow-up with comments on the results. I'll gladly assist you further at that time.
Char1ieJ

Nov 11, 2008 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Scratched negatives; broken tractor drive on two cameras


There doesn't seem to be a pattern with any of the Fuji films (I use Sensia and Velvia, exclusively, and have never had a problem in my Canon EOS). There are reports that the Fuji Pro films will gum up the sprockets in a camera, thanks to an adhesive strip at the end of the roll, but I'm not sure if the regular 400 speed film has the same problem. You might try a thorough cleaning, and see if it is still happening. I'm not surprised that 400 speed comes out a tad dark. Try dropping to 200 speed (I generally won't use anything above 100 speed, unless it is black&while).

Cheers

Nov 10, 2008 | Photography

2 Answers

Film developing clear


Hello

This problem could have a number of causes,

To check to see if it is a camera fault of developing fault you could try using a cheap colour film in the camera and getting it developed at a normal photo processor.
This will determine in which half of the process the fault lies.
If the pictures from the colour film are the same then it must be a camera usage problem or fault.
If the pictures are ok from the colour film then it will be a problem in either the film being used, developing problem (poor mix of chemicals etc).

This will just speed up the diagnosis a bit.

Oct 02, 2008 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Developing film


You need a whole bunch of chemicals, paper, equipment and some kind of dark room, plus an enlarger. This is all quite expensive, I suggest you concentrate on figuring out how to take the photos for a bit before you learn to develop your own.

May 24, 2008 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Agfa Gevaert Repromaster 310 Helioprint


try to contact www.purup-eskofot.com/ as I beleive they bourght the remains of Helioprint years ago.

Nils - old management member of Heliporint AS

Jan 23, 2008 | Office Equipment & Supplies

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