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Focusing When using the optical zoom, is there any way to focus on an object that is not in the center of the frame?

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On most digital cameras you can point at an object centred in the lens and hold the shutter control in slightly, them move the camera to another area with the focus/exposure set. If your camera gets it's focus as an average of multiple points this may be a little tougher.

Regards

Philip

Posted on Jul 31, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Why won't my fugi finepix s4500 won't focus sharply ?


No good working auto focus can have many causes.
Like the camera is in Macro mode, or manual focus. The best thing to try, is to switch your camera to the auto mode. The camera logo on your mode dial. And then shoot some pictures. There should be enough light and contrast in the frame, on the place you want the camera to focus on. Sometimes you have to chose an object, with enough details and contrast, on the same distance as the object you want to take a picture of. Then press the shutter half way, till the camera is in focus. the indicator lamp next to the mode dial glows green. Then frame the picture like you want it taken end only than press the shutter completely.
If the camera does focus correct in the auto mode, then you can check, why it did not focus before.
Check page 19 of the manual, to see how to use the shutter release button, for correct focus.

Apr 23, 2014 | Fuji Finepix S1500 10.0 Megapixel 12x...

1 Answer

No possibility to focus objekts


Your lens elements are not moving smoothly. Maybe gummed up.

Mar 01, 2012 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z10 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

Cannot focus single focus side of monarck binoculars


First you must focus the left eye on a given object with the center focus wheel. Once the left eye is sharp while looking at the same object adjust the right eye to be as sharp as possible. The right eye diopter is only meant to adjust for the small differences between the eyes.
Thomas E. Kuenzli Eagle Optics (800) 289-1132

Dec 18, 2010 | Nikon Monarch ATB 7345 Binocular

1 Answer

I have problems focusing my f8000sd fuji camera when zooming in on small things.IIf I try to zoom right in on a butterfly for example,it will not focus and I can't use macro and get closer in case it flies...


Use spot metering & focus when taking pictures of an object.
Set your camera to highest Megapixel setting, Only use max. optical zoom on the subject (do not use digital zoom) .U dont need to get close to object as you can edit/zoom/crop the picture using any photo software program afterwards .

Aug 09, 2009 | Fuji Finepix Z20fd Digital Camera

1 Answer

Conversion lenses & filters


These screw on the front of the plastic lens adapter and adjust the focal length. On the side of the adapter lenses it will quote the ratio. My wide angle says 0.66x so just multiply the range of focal lengths by this figure and you will see that it adjusts the camera zoom accordingly - making the image wider and probably also increasing the depth of field (what is in focus). Similarly a 1.5 tele will inrease the range of focal lengths to make the lens "longer" eg higher magnification , useful for astro photography - shots of the moon and terrestrial long distance work but detracting from the depth of field, eg the range of distance over which objects are in focus will be reduced.

The wide angle will allow you to come in close and get WIDE objects fully in-frame- hence "wide angle", while the telephoto will give you better overall maginification of the image but will probably increase the MINIMUM focal length - eg you may not be able to focus on objects closer than >2m (instead of ~1).

The screw-on adapter lenses I found were cheap in a Jessops sale use a 52mm thread, while the S5500 provides a 55mm internal thread. I use an appropriate 55mm to 52mm step down ring adapter. There is slight vignetting (shading around the edge of an image) at certain combinations of zoom, but generally these are very useful accessories.

As these are adapter lenses on the front of an already powerful 10x zoom that must be optically compromised at the price of this camera, there maybe some colour fringeing around bright images. If you want a better solution you really need to get a DSLR. Overall a good solution for the price.


Sep 17, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S5500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Lcd window all out of focus..like a cirsus mirror


Usually it is from a smudged lens. Clean the lens and is if that helps. If it is still out of focus check your zoom. Cameras have to types of zoom, optical and digital. Once you reach the max optical zoom the digital zoom kicks in. Digital zoom isn't that great quality because all it is doing is bring the dots in frame closer. If zoom is all the way in and still out of focus check to see what type of setting you are on. Even though you put it on auto there are cameras that have other settings while on auto that you can change the colors and other stuff like b/w, sephia, etc. If all else fails then I would have to say that your lcd is wearing down and needs to be replaced.

Apr 28, 2008 | Cameras

3 Answers

Focusing the 770


Tom, It's best to do the zoom first, then focus (if you are using the autofocus).

Sep 11, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-D770 Digital Camera

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