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I am trying to install a replacement chord on the back of my dryer. The old cord that was already on it has 3 cables and the new one has 4 with the colors red, white, green, and black. The rep in the store says the black and red wires are the hot wires. Do they need to be color coded with the wires on the back of the dryer?

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Not really each is 110v color code just makes it easier to know where they go

Posted on Aug 01, 2008

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1 Answer

Replace dryer cord


There should be a cover where the cable goes into. Look at your old dryer - notice where the red, black, white and green cables go to - they should be marked. Compare those to your new dryer. With the power cord unplugged from the wall, remove the cord from the old dryer and install on the new one. The cord should have terminals already installed - you will need a socket to remove the nut holdng the terminals down.

If the power cord is really old and the insulation cracks when you bend the cord, replace the cord.

Dec 16, 2013 | Kenmore 700 6972 Dryer

1 Answer

How do you connect the LG DLEX5101V Dryer to the electrical outlet on the wall if there is no cord to plug in?


There are a couple of types of plugs in homes - and the dryer manufacturer use this excuse to not ship a cord with the dryer - profiting that much more. You'll need to purchase a cord set for your dryer. Assuming you live in the U.S., that means you need a 30 amp 240 volt cord. That's easy enough, but it does get harder.

Most homes have an outlet that has three slots in it - like the one below:
steve_con_39.jpg
A 240 volt, 30 amp, 3 wire dryer plug.

New homes have a safer, 240 volt 30amp 4 wire plug. They look like the one below:
steve_con_40.jpg
A 240 volt, 30 amp, 4 wire dryer plug.

The code states that when a dryer is purchased it should be connected via a 4 wire cord. This means if you have the older, 3 wire outlet - it will have to be changed along with the entire length of cable between the electrical panel and the outlet (the new outlet needs a 4 wire cable - the older plug was supplied by a 3 wire cable).

Those are the rules. Many people opt to purchase the older 3 wire cords so that they can connect directly to the 3 wire outlet already installed in their home. As an electrician, I have to caution you on doing that. It is a violation of the electrical code as it has been identified as an unsafe condition. The code hopes to rectify this by slowly requiring new dryers to be wired with 4 wire cords and making the homeowner upgrade the old 3 wire outlet to a newer, safer 4 wire outlet. Of course, no one will come to see what you had and if you changed it, etc.

Mose hardware stores, Home Depot, Lowes, etc. sell these cords for under $20. Make sure you choose a 30 amp dryer cord - and not the similar looking but thicker 50 amp stove or range cord.

I hope this helps & good luck! Please rate my reply.

Mar 22, 2011 | LG Dryers

1 Answer

I am changing the 4 wire on my 2 yr old maytag dryer to a 3 wire to fit the recptical in my new house. Other then the 2 hots and 1 neutral connection, my dryer also has a white ground wire off to the side,...


So you have an, ahem... problem....you have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as is...it will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:
http://www.applianceaid.com/general.html#3to4

NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety measure...in the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.

The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's work...plus materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical work...you can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 19, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

Need to replace existing three wire plug with new four wire plug. there are only three terminals to connect to. what do i do?


Based on your description....you have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as is...it will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:
http://www.applianceaid.com/general.html#3to4


NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety measure...in the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.



The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's work...plus materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical work...you can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 08, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

How do I change the 4 wire to 3 wire plug


Move dryer away from wall. On the back of the dryer, near where the power cord goes into the dryer, there should be a small access panel held in place with 1 or 2 screws. Inside there should be 4 screw terminals. They may be color coded red, black, white and green. Make a note or take a picture of it before you go any further. Loosen the screws that hold the 4 wires of the old cord and remove. Install the new 3-wire cord, note that it will not have the green (ground) wire on it. After all is put back together, you should be good.

Nov 10, 2009 | LG DLE2514 Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Conect 4 wires to 3 wires box in the wall


These two pictures illustrate the power wiring on a the terminal of an electric dryer. The one to the left here is the old-style three-wire configuration. Most people have this type in their homes. New code changes, though, require that dryers now have a four-wire cord, shown to the right. These are just just thumbnail pictures that you can click for a larger view. But I'll bet you already figured that out, didn't you?
Besides the number of wires in each cord, there are two important things to notice. First, in the four-wire configuration, notice that the dryer's grounding strap is folded back on itself. The whole point of the four-wire cord is to separate the ground from the neutral. The green wire (the "new" extra wire in the four-wire cord) is attached to the dryer cabinet. In the three-wire configuration, the grounding strap is left intact and the neutral and ground are tied together.
tn_3prong_dryer_outlet.jpgtn_4prong_dryer_outlet.jpgIf you need to re-wire the outlet, these pictures will explain the anatomy of the three-prong (left) and four-prong (right) outlets. Once again, these pictures are just thumbnails--click 'em for a larger view.

Sure hope this helps you find a resolution to your delimma! Best wishes.

Comments: Jul 23, 2009- bf71290.jpgfb4d3ed.jpg

Three wire Four wire.

Aug 18, 2009 | Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Changing power cord from 4 to 3 prong


Hi,

See this link and read the article carefully - if your dryer already has a 4 wire cord, it should be replaced with same type.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electrical-Wiring-Home-1734/replacing-power-cord-dryer.htm

Apr 13, 2009 | Maytag Neptune MDE6700A Electric Dryer

1 Answer

My dryer has a 3 pronged connector but the new house has a 4 pronged receptical. I took the old cord off and purchased an new 4 pronged cord. My problem is that the dryer has three connecting points for...


to a screw on the rear of cabinet there may already be a wire connected there if so remove it and tape it off install green ground wire there

Aug 05, 2008 | Dryers

1 Answer

Wiring a 3 prong neptune to a 4 prong new outlet


red and black wires go to outside screws ..white goes to middle screw..lift green ground wire from screw in cabinet back and either tape off or connect to middle screw on connector ..green wire on cord goes in it's place

Jul 29, 2008 | Maytag Neptune MDE5500AY Electric Dryer

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