Question about Jenn-Air JMV8208AAS Microwave Oven

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Dead microwave We had a power surge during the night, and the next morning all of the GFIs in the kitchen had tripped. I reset them, but the microwave is still dark (no lights, juice, etc.). There is power from the plug to the unit - I checked that. I checked the fuse - it was good - but I replaced it anyway. Still a dead dog. A repairman indicated it was the computerized panel behind the control pad. The curious part (makes no sense to me) is that when I press the reset button on one of the GFIs that was tripped, the microwave gives a single approximately one second beep. This is with the unit unplugged! Any ideas? Thanks JB

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  • ksandman99 Sep 24, 2008

    We were using the timer on the microwave to preheat the oven. After 15 minutes the microwave made a popping noise and completely shut off. The microwave was very hot inside. We unplugged it and put in a new fuse, checked all breakers and still have no power.

  • dianesd624 Oct 08, 2008

    I too, have a similar problem. We were using the micro timer, also to preheat after a few minutes it made a pop and went completely dead. The circuits didn't trip, but the outlet has power. We ordered a new fuse but can't seem to find where it is located inside the unit. I hesitate to call for a technician, they want like 100 bucks just to walk to the front door. If anyone can help me, I would really appreciate it. Thanks!!!!!!

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  • Jenn-Air Master
  • 8,820 Answers

If it gives a little beep, then there's still some life in the control board. That's an encouraging sign.

In most cases, we can fix these boards. We repair these for customers nationwide with our guaranteed $39.95 service.

We have full details, plus critical safety, disassembly, and troubleshooting info at our site. You'll find a link to our site in our listing here on FixYa.

At our site, we now have a video available showing how to remove a typical control panel assembly in under 5 minutes.

Feel free to contact me directly.

We're happy to help you with free advice and we'd appreciate your thoughtful rating of our answer.

William E. Miller
prototech@usa.net
http://www.microwavedisplay.com

Posted on Aug 03, 2008

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1 Answer

Over range microwave model jvm1650wb008 fan works nothing else does


Check to see if circuit breaker is tripped in the electrical panel, or if it is connected to a ground fault outlet, it may have tripped. Sometimes there is one ground fault outlet serving others in series in the kitchen.

Nov 25, 2011 | GE Microwave Ovens

2 Answers

Model "KOT-152UW" The


well inside the unit check for any burn fuses on the power supply area, and into the control board. fuse basically the one will tripped if power surged occurred..

Jun 27, 2008 | Microwave Ovens

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Continued


What can go wrong The most common problems occur in the microwave generating portion of the system, though the controller can be blown by a lightning strike or other power surge. Bad interlock switches probably account for the majority of microwave oven problems. Also, since the touchpad is exposed, there is a chance that it can get wet or damaged. If wet, a week or so of non-use may cure keys that don't work. If damaged, it will probably need to be replaced - this is straightforward if the part can be obtained, usually direct from the manufacturer. Unfortunately, it is an expensive part ($20-50 typical). The interlock switches, being electromechanical can fail to complete the primary circuit on an oven which appears to operate normally with no blown fuses but no heat as well. Faulty interlocks or a misaligned door may result in the fuse blowing as described above due to the incorrect sequencing of the door interlock switches. Failed interlocks are considered to be the most common problems with microwave ovens, perhaps as high as 75% of all failures
No adjustments should ever be required for a microwave oven and there are no screws to turn so don't look for any!

General system problems The following problems are likely power or controller related and not in the microwave generator unless due to a blown fuse or bad/intermittent connections:
  • Totally dead oven.
  • No response to any buttons on touchpad
  • Oven runs when door is still open.
  • Oven starts on its own as soon as door is closed.
  • Oven works but display is blank.
  • Whacked out controller or incorrect operation.
  • Erratic behavior.
  • Some keys on the touchpad do not function or perform the wrong action.
  • Microwave oven does not respond to START button.
First, unplug the microwave oven for a couple of minutes. Sometimes, the microcontroller will get into a whacko mode for some unknown reason - perhaps a power surge - and simply needs to be reset. The problem may never reoccur.
Note: when working on controller related problems, unplug the connection to the microwave generator (HV transformer primary) from the power relay or triac - it is often a separate connector. This will prevent any possible accidental generation of microwave energy as well as eliminating the high voltage (but not the AC line) shock hazard during servicing.
If this does not help, there is likely a problem with the controller circuitry or its power and you will have to get inside the oven.


Uninvited guests Some cockroaches (or other lower life forms) may have taken up residence on the controller circuit board. It is warm, cozy, safe, and from their point of view makes an ideal habitat. If you got the microwave oven from a flea market, garage sale, the curb, a relative, or friend, or if your kitchen isn't the cleanest in the world, such visitors are quite possible. Creatures with six or more legs (well, some two legged varieties as well) are not known for their skills in the areas of housekeeping and personal hygiene. Clean the circuit board and connectors thoroughly with water and then isopropyl alcohol. Dry completely. Inspect the circuit traces for corrosion or other damage. If there are any actual breaks, these will have be be jumpered with fine wire and then soldered. Hopefully, no electronic components were affected though there is always a slight possibility of other problems.
Totally dead oven First, check power to the outlet using a lamp or radio you know works. The fuse or circuit breaker at your service panel may have blown/tripped due to an overload or fault in the microwave oven or some other appliance. You may just have too many appliances plugged into this circuit - microwave ovens are high current appliances and should be on a dedicated circuit if possible. If you attempt to run a heating appliance like a toaster or fryer at the same time, you *will* blow the fuse or trip the circuit breaker. A refrigerator should never be plugged into the same circuit for this reason as well - you really don't want it to be without power because of your popcorn! If you find the fuse blown or circuit breaker tripped, unplug everything from the circuit to which the microwave is connected (keep in mind that other outlets may be fed from the same circuit). Replace the fuse or reset the circuit breaker. If the same thing happens again, you have a problem with the outlet or other wiring on the same branch circuit. If plugging in the microwave causes the fuse to blow or circuit breaker to trip immediately, there is a short circuit in the power cord or elsewhere.
The microwave oven may be powered from a GFCI outlet or downstream of one and the GFCI may have tripped. (Removing a broken oven lamp has been known to happen.) The GFCI outlet may not be in an obvious location but first check the countertop outlets. The tripped GFCI could be in the garage or almost anywhere else! Pushing the RESET button may be all that's needed.
Next, try to set the clock. With some ovens the screen will be totally blank following a power outage - there may be nothing wrong with it. Furthermore, some ovens will not allow you perform any cooking related actions until the clock is set to a valid time.
Assuming these are not your problems, a fuse has probably blown although a dead controller is a possibility.
If the main fuse is upstream of the controller, then any short circuit in the microwave generator will also disable the controller and display. If this is the case, then putting in a new fuse will enable the touchpad/display to function but may blow again as soon as a cook cycle is initiated if there is an actual fault in the microwave circuits.
Therefore, try a new fuse. If this blows immediately, there may be a short very near the line cord, in the controller, or a defective triac (if your oven uses a triac). Or, even a shorted oven lamp - remove and inspect the light bulb and socket.
If it does not blow, initiate a cook cycle (with a cup of water inside). If the oven now works, the fuse may simply have been tired of living. This is common.
If the fuse still blows immediately, confirm that the controller is operational by unplugging the microwave generator, power relay, and/or triac from the controller. If a new fuse does not now blow when a cook cycle is initiated - and it appears to operate normally - then one of the components in the microwave generator is defective (shorted).
Some models have a thermal fuse as well and this may have failed for no reason or a cooling fan may not be working and the oven overheated (in which case it probably would have died while you were cooking something for an important guest - assuming you would use a microwave oven for such a thing!).
Other possible causes: bad controller power supply or bad controller chip.


Totally dead oven after repair On some microwave ovens, there is at least one cabinet screw that is slightly longer than all the others. This engages a safety interlock which prevents the oven from receiving power if the correct screw is missing or in the wrong hole. Check the length of all the screws and locate the interlock switch behind one of the screw holes. I don't know how common this practice is but have heard of it on some Sharp models.

Dead controller The most common way that the controller circuitry can be harmed is by a power surge such as from a lightning strike. Hopefully, only components on the primary side of the power transformer will be affected.
  • Check the primary of the power transformer - if it is open, there may be a fuse/thermal fuse underits outer insulation. If not, the transformer will need to be replaced. There is a good chance that the surge didn't propagate beyond the transformer and thus the rest of the controlled should be unaffected.
  • In some cases, circuit board traces may have been vaporized (but repair may still be possible by simply jumpering across the crater). Some of these thin traces may be there specifically to act as fuses - and there may even be spares to use for just this situation!
  • Assuming that the main fuse and power transformer primary checks out, then check the power supply for the controller next.
  • As always, also check for bad solder connections.
If the controller power supply is working and there is still no sign of life (dead display and no response to buttons) the microcontroller chip or some other part may be bad. It could be a simple part like a capacitor or diode, but they would all need to be tested. At this point, a schematic of the controller board will be needed - often impossible to get - and replacement controller or even just the main chip may be nearly as expensive as a complete new oven.

on Mar 30, 2008 | Kenmore 80412 Microwave Oven

1 Answer

I accidently ran it for a few minutes wih nothing in it. I turned it off and everyting seemed fine. Later I walked in kitchen and there is no light, power or anything.


I assume you checked the power cord and house power circuit breaker panel... possibly tripped unrelated to your running the microwave empty.

(the following is from http://www.kellerstudio.de/repairfaq/sam/micfaq.htm#mictotdo)


The microwave oven may be powered from a GFCI outlet or downstream of one and the GFCI may have tripped. (Removing a broken oven lamp has been known to happen.) The GFCI outlet may not be in an obvious location but first check the countertop outlets. The tripped GFCI could be in the garage or almost anywhere else! Pushing the RESET button may be all that's needed.

Next, try to set the clock. With some ovens the screen will be totally blank following a power outage - there may be nothing wrong with it. Furthermore, some ovens will not allow you perform any cooking related actions until the clock is set to a valid time.

If those are not the problems, then the main fuse is the most likely suspect for a totally dead microwave.
Remember, while you can do some repairs on you microwave, what you don't know can kill you... even on an unplugged microwave, so make sure you understand the dangers and how to reduce them before you try anything inside a microwave. If you want to do more yourself, let me know and I will point you in the direction of some good resources.

Oct 21, 2010 | GE Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

No power everything was fine then nothing when i got home is there any fuses to check in the microwave


There is a fuse under the cover, as well as a couple of safety thermostats that can cause a dead oven. It may also be that the power transformer for the control circuit board has failed. I've seen several Sharp ovens where the transformer died because of power surges. This would cause no display and no functions even though the oven has power. Also, did you make sure the outlet your oven is plugged into has power? If it's a GFI outlet it may need to be reset, or a circuit breaker in your electric service panel may have tripped.

Hope this helps, and thanks for using Fixya!

Feb 28, 2010 | Sharp R-1850A Convection/Microwave Oven

2 Answers

I have the Kenmoore Microwave Hood 721.80402. During this last wave of storms, I was without power for 2 days. Once the power was restored, the microwave will not work. Everything is plugged in and the...


You might try pulling the plug on the unit and leaving it overnight. The electronics may have locked up due to irregular voltage during the failure. There may also be a GFI (ground fault interrupter) on that circuit that has tripped for the same reason. Check the kitchen outlets for a tripped GFI.

Feb 14, 2010 | Kenmore 62622 Microwave Oven

1 Answer

My Panasonic microwave oven has started ''beeping'' the night during cold weather and also if the kitchen door is open sometimes. This morning the Micropower button is not working so am unable to use the...


Hi the touch mabrane panel will be faulty and need to be replaced. Best place to obtain one of these or a service engineer is from the manufacturer. www.panasonic.com

Hope this helps

Jan 07, 2010 | Microwave Ovens

2 Answers

Frigidere PLMV169DCD


You most likely had a power surge and blew a fuse. First unplug the unit,then remove the top grill. There will either be one screw on top of the control pad or 2 on the left side. open the control panel and look for a fuse that has a ceramic center and replace it with a 20 amp one. You can find these at the hardware store

Jan 31, 2009 | Frigidaire PLMV169DC Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Jenn-air microwave JMC 7000 ADB has no power


I have a different Jenn-Air built in microwave & oven combination but I'm sure my solution will work for you as well.

My microwave was plugged into an outlet located on the top of the oven. This outlet has a "circuit breaker" that tripped while we were using the self cleaning feature on the oven. You just need to reset the breaker button right next to the wall oven outlet. Why it tripped is a mystery since the microwave was not in use at the time. Bad design.

Of course, getting to the reset button is your only challenge. You need to pull the microwave and oven out of the wall/cabinetry in order to get to it. The unit is heavy so you will need help. Or, call a certified repairman and they should be able to do this for you in 30 minutes or less so the service call should not run you more than @$85 if it is no longer under warranty.

I would also suggest you contact Jenn-Air to complain about this issue and seek reimbursement from them if necessary.

Dec 17, 2007 | Jenn-Air JMC7000 Microwave Oven

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