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Some of my action shots are not sharpe using an IS lens, shooting at a shutter speed above 1000, and my focus centered on the subject.

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I talked to a Canon help rep by phone and he gave me suggestions on how to solve my problem.

Posted on Jul 29, 2008

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I get blurred indication on display and the pictures clicked are dark and not clear.


1. Your shutter speed's too slow

Take the effective focal length of your lens and divide it into 1 to get the minimum safe handheld shutter speed you should use. For example, with a 200mm equivalent lens, you shouldn't shoot any slower than 1/200sec or you risk camera shake. You might even get some shake at 1/500sec.

2. You're placing too much trust in VR

Nikon's Vibration Reduction system can let you shoot with shutter speeds four stops slower than usual - but don't count on it. This is a best-case scenario, and it's wise to assume no more than two stops. VR improves your success rate, it doesn't guarantee sharpness.

3. Your subject is moving

Moving subjects will appear blurred at slow shutter speeds, so even if you can hold your camera steady and even if the VR system does a great job, you will still need to use fast shutter speeds for moving subjects.

4. The ISO is too high

Sometimes you have to use really high ISOs just to avoid camera shake, but be aware that at the highest settings you will see a loss of detail. The camera uses noise reduction processes to reduce the appearance of noise, and these erode fine detail too.

field myths

Depth of field is the zone of near-to-far sharpness within your pictures, but it's only apparent sharpness, not real sharpness. Depth of field relies on objects looking sharp enough at normal viewing distances and magnifications even though they're ever so slightly out of focus. If you zoom in far enough, you will see that some objects aren't completely sharp even when they're technically within the depth of field limits.

6. Your lens aperture is too small

Small apertures used to be associated with better image quality. That was when lenses were comparatively unsophisticated and cameras used larger formats, such as 35mm and 120 roll film. But at small apertures an unavoidable optical effect called 'diffraction' sets in, where fine detail starts to blur. With today's smaller sensors and sophisticated zoom lens designs, you can see this as early as f/11. If you shoot at f/16 or f/22, your shots will be visibly softer than those shot at wider apertures.

7. You're focused on the wrong thing

Watch the AF points in the camera's viewfinder. If you're using auto-area AF, the camera will pick the nearest subject, which may not be what you intended. If you're using single-point AF, make sure the AF point's over the correct part of the scene. Tip: on some cameras, including the D3100, it's very easy to accidentally push the AF point to the right with the base of your thumb as you hold the camera and not notice.

8. Handheld close-ups shots are risky!

When you're really close to your subject, the depth of field is so small that the slightest movement on your part will throw your subject out of focus. The more you concentrate on staying still, the more you sway! Higher shutter speeds won't make the slightest difference - you need a tripod.

9. Focus/recompose errors

It's often useful to focus on one thing then keep the shutter button half-pressed so that you can recompose the picture and shoot. But in that time, you may have moved, the subject may have moved or, if the camera's in its default AF-A mode, it make think the subject is moving, switch to AF-C (continuous) operation and attempt to re-focus.

10. Is your lens clean?

If you walk into a humid indoor environment, your lens may mist up, producing a blurry, soft-focus effect. Other causes of blur are greasy smears and fingermarks - so check the front of your lens before blaming the camera.

Aug 02, 2015 | Cameras

1 Answer

Some of my pictures are blurry using a cannon rebel 3. how can i fix this problem?


There are several possible causes for blurry pictures.
1) Camera motion. If everything is blurry, it's most likely because the camera moved while the picture was being taken. Make sure your shutter speed is fast enough if you're handholding the camera (longer lenses require faster shutter speed). Alternatively, put your camera on a stable surface, such as a tripod or a tabletop.
2) Subject motion. If the subject is blurry but the background is sharper, then the subject may have moved while the picture was being taken. Use a faster shutter speed. Raise the ISO if needed. There are limits, of course. If you're trying to photograph a fast-moving object in the dark, you probably won't be able to.
3) Improper focus. If the subject is blurry but something else in the picture is sharp, then the camera probably focused on the wrong object. Move the focus selector to the subject you want in focus. Alternatively, center the viewfinder on the subject, press the shutter button halfway to lock focus, then reframe and shoot.
Without any more specific information as to what and how your pictures are blurry, I'm afraid the above is all I can give you.

Jan 13, 2012 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Unsharp pictures when using the leica macro 90mm 4:0 lens as a telephoto lens


Besides any problems with the focus mechanism which should be fairly obvious, your shutter speed may be too slow. A slow shutter speed can be set manually or caused automatically when using a smaller aperture in lower light settings, the camera compensates by opening up the shutter. Try testing your lens out in bright scenes with the aperture open. Another problem is with manual lenses at low apertures. It can be difficult to manually focus at just the right point because shooting around f.4 with a longer barrel lens leads to a very shallow depth of field. To compensate, try a smaller aperture or take a few photos of a subject while adjusting your focus to get the "money shot." If all the above fails make sure to double check your sensor and lens are clean, a greasy or dirty lens will always lead to less crisp photos.

Feb 26, 2011 | Leica 90mm f/4 Macro-Elmar M Manual Focus...

1 Answer

Shoot at speed


The sports mode on a DSLR just picks high ISO and fast shutter speeds for you. Go Karts are very fast subject to focus on, so there are two techniques you can try.

One is to set your focus to manual mode and pre focus a point where the car will pass through. Set the camera to multi shot mode and just before the kart gets to the pre-determined point, hit the shutter button. The camera will fire off a few shots, then review later on a computer to chooset the best one out of the sequence.

Another way is set your focus mode for AI-Servo or Focus Tracking mode, this will enable the lens to track moving subjects (as single shot mode is way to slow to keep up with karts). Go to the slowest part of the track to get more sucess.

One problem you maybe having is that the shutter speed is too slow for karts. Being indoors the lighting will be very poor, so a super high ISO rating will need to be used to get faster shutter speeds. Having a lens with a very wide aperture (like f2 of f2.8 or even less) will enable you to get faster shutter speeds because they let in more light.

Good luck.

Jan 17, 2010 | Pentax K110D Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to get manual focus on Olympus Camedia C-750 ultra zoom digital camera


TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTITf correct focus cannot be obtained
When the subject to be focused is not on the AF target mark (not positioned
in the center of the composition), you can use the following steps to obtain the
correct focus on the subject. This operation is referred to as "focus lock".
Determine the position of the subject after focusing (Focus Lock)
1 Press the power switch.
• The camera turns on in the shooting
mode.
• The lens extends and the monitor turns
on.
• The orange lamp lights.
2 Turn the mode dial and select a
shooting mode.
"Shooting mode" (P.36)
3 Position the AF target mark on
the subject you want to focus on.
• When shooting a hard-to-focus
subject, point the camera at an object
about the same distance away as the
subject.
Press the shutter button halfway
until the green lamp lights.
• When the green lamp lights steadily,
the focus and the exposure are locked.
• When the green lamp blinks, the focus
and exposure are not locked. Release
your finger from the shutter button, reposition
your subject and press the
shutter button halfway again.
5 Keeping the shutter button
pressed halfway, recompose
your shot.
6 Press the shutter button fully.
Try the above, info from D-535, C-370 and X-450.
I can email you the complete manual if this works.
Regards
Phillip

Sep 12, 2009 | Cameras

3 Answers

Blurry photos that are really frustrating!


Evening & Indoors? The kit lens is really going to struggle here. Your only immediate solution is to use ISO 1600 which makes the shutter faster but adds a little noise to the pictures.

You really want to get a better lens for indoor work. If you need cheap, try the 50mm f1.8, it's a prime not a zoom, so you will need to use your feet to "zoom" but it's incredibly good for indoor / low light work.

I upgraded to a 17-55mm f2.8 IS, it was rather expensive but I have never had a blurry indoor shot since - I do also use an external Speedlite flash with it though, which also helps tremendously.

It's an expensive hobby!!

Nov 04, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

You answer to my resent problem on night shots...


Hey matty reps,
Aperture priority is a setting on most SLR cameras where you choose the aperture, which is the size of the opening in the lens that lets light thru, and the camera chooses a shutter speed that provides a correct exposure. The smaller the opening in the lens the less light that gets thru to expose the film so the shutter has to stay open longer to provide a correct exposure, but the smaller the aperture you use the larger the depth of field. Depth of field is how far in front and behind the subject things are in sharp focus. Canon refers to aperture priority as Av mode. With flash photography the camera usually sets the shutter speed to a designated speed called xsync speed, which is probably 1/90th of a second since this is what you said the camera was setting it to, but that speed is irrelevant since the duration of the flash is what determines the exposure time with flash photography which is usually around 1/10000 of a second (easily fast enough to stop almost any action). In aperture priority with a flash the smaller the aperture you use the more that will be in focus but more light will be needed from the flash and the closer you will need to be to your subject. A hotshoe mounted flash will help tremendously. I hope I didn't confuse you more, but as I said before you are attempting something difficult to do in photography. Keep trying and you'll get it!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 29, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Fuzzy images


Hey jjbeanwink,
This is a very nice lens, and is unlikely that your blurry images are caused by the lens. The most common cause of blurry pictures is that the shutter speed is set to low. A general rule would be your shutter speed should be at least 1/60th of a second while handholding the camera. The bigger the lens, and the higher the magnification of the subject you are using the faster the shutter speed you should use. If camera shake is the cause of your blurry pictures you could also try using a tripod. Another common cause of blurry images is subject movement, and one solution would also be setting a faster shutter speed. Another solution is using the flash to stop the action instead of the shutter speed. Of course manufacturers do occasionally make a bad product and that is why there are manufacturers’ warranties. If you just purchased this lens you could have an authorized service technician look at the lens and see if there is anything wrong with it. I these suggestions help!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 12, 2008 | Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 Lens

1 Answer

Action pics with a long lens


What you are experiencing is not blur, its camera shake. You are shooting in low light so the shutter speed is being reduced by the camera's automatic features. Also the longer the lens (the farther you zoom), the higher the shutter speed you need. Even for non moving objects or when panning the shutter speed should be at least one stop above the focal length. ie - 300mm lens = 500 or 1000 shutter AT LEAST! (and don't forget, if its a film lens on your rebel, thats actually 300mm x 1.6 =480mm, so 1000 shutter or higher min.) Moving objects require even faster shutters. Solutions: Get faster (also called brighter) lenses which can be pricey. In low light use higher iso settings in the camera menu. Shoot in either manual or Tv mode and choose the higher shutter speeds while using the light meter to decide aperture. Use wider angle lenses or back off the zoom and move closer. Stabilizers built into the lens can steady the shot by two to four times as well.

Sep 14, 2007 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

2 Answers

DSC p72 blurring


Hello Steve, I've bought that very same camera myself, and i feel quite happy with it. I do know what you're refering to since i've dealt with that problem before. About the Blurring "effect", i'm affraid this is due to a lack of focus regulation from you. In this camera it is possible to achieve very good results once you control the Metering and Focus in an accurate way. In other words you'll have to take over the Focus and Metering control regularly. As you may know the Focus Options are (if i'm not mistaken) , infinite, 7m, 3m, 1m, 0.5m, center, multiple. Basically if you're indoors there's no need to use the infinite, center or multiple focus (except in specific situations), which you may keep to outdoor Shots. Indoors, you'll get far better results, intensively using the 0,5m, 1m, 3m or 7m. Hope i didn't put it to much confuse. Summing it up a bit, you'll have to use more often these controls according to each single situation. Please, let me know something wether it worked or not. Regards

Sep 13, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P72 Digital Camera

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