Question about AOpen AK77-8X Max (91.8A710.101) Motherboard

8 Answers

Disk boot error mes

Replaced video card & hard drive work for few days then get same mes Can get into BIOS screen on startup but it won't boot up

ronkut

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  • ronkut Jul 28, 2008

    What do they mean by reinstalling system? How do I do that?

  • ronkut Jul 28, 2008

    I can't seem to get an ans. How do you reinstall operating system?

  • ronkut Jul 28, 2008

    George, thanks for info. I don't know if I can get old video card back it was at a shop. The disk I had won't be accepted by system. Somehow the repair man thinks I have a power or heat problem. Also he said I can't replace my motherboard.

    Ron

  • ronkut Jul 28, 2008

    I did all that everything was connected.

    Ron

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8 Answers

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Dear Sir/Madam,

Do a check disk.
Log in Safemode. Start>Run.. type cmd and hit enter.
type chkdsk /f and hit enter.
Your hdd might be failing, let checkdisk fix the bad sectors if it can. Or else u can try this...

Correct this pc problem first of all sounds like you need to formatyour hard drive is a definite cure but before you do this try systemrestore by hitting start then all programs accessories then systemtools then hit system restore and then pick a date that prob startedmight help. Or backup your system another thing but me personally ifyou know how to format your hard drive then that's the way but if youdon't take it to a repair shop and tell them that you need to formatyour hard drive. It is real easy but drivers if not installed correctlycan cause you serious problems.

Click this link for more information....

http://fix-errors.remove-junk.com/
http://www.pcaholic.com/

Thanks
Good luck

Don't forget to rate the solution

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

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  • 2,071 Answers

Just click below;


Posted on Jul 28, 2008

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Disk boot error is just a physical connection problem from hard drive to the motherboard most of the time. Worst is a defective hard drive. Make sure the cables are connected and pushed properly. Try to unplug and re-plug the hard drive cable and be sure to plug the power to the hard drive.

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

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Use the following steps, in sequence, until a solution is found.
Step 1: Begin troubleshooting by removing media and connected devices
v Turn on the computer and remove any CDs and DVDs from their drives using the CD/DVD eject button on the outside of the CD/DVD drive.
v If you are unable to turn on the computer and/or eject the discs, continue using these steps. Remember to remove the discs when the computer has power and you are able to open the drive door.
v Turn off the computer and unplug the power cable from the power outlet.
v With the computer turned off remove all other media and devices that are connected to the computer except for the mouse, monitor, and keyboard. Remove any floppies, printers, USB and FireWire devices, music players, cameras, and flash memory cards.
v With the media and devices removed, turn on the computer.
v If the computer has the same startup problem, leave the devices disconnected, turn off the computer and continue to Step 2. If the computer does not have the same problem, continue using these steps.
v If the computer is able to open Windows after the media and devices were removed, one of these items was preventing Windows from opening. Find which device or media item is causing the problem by reattaching or reinserting each to the computer one at a time. Restart the computer each time a device or media item is added until the startup problem reoccurs.
v Once the media or device that is causing the problem has been identified, do not continue to use it. You can troubleshoot the device or media further. Here are some helpful troubleshooting tips:
v Now that you know which device is contributing to the startup problem, you can search the Internet or visit the manufacturer Support Web site to find more help and information.
v CD, DVD, floppy, or camera cards that are damaged, dirty or scratched may interfere with the startup process. Do not start the computer with media in the drives.
v The computer may try to start an operating system from an external storage device, such as a USB or FireWire drive. You can immediately work around this problem by attaching external storage devices only after Windows has opened.
v Camera cards that are left in printers can cause startup problems. Do not leave camera cards in printers.
v Some printers that have media card readers might contribute to startup problems when used with computers that have older BIOS versions. Updating the BIOS on the computer may resolve the problem. For further information about how to find and download BIOS updates for your HP or Compaq computer, please refer to updating the BIOS.If the problem still exists, continue to the next step.

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

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  • Inderpal Singh
    Inderpal Singh Jul 28, 2008

    Step 2: Continue to identify the type of startup problem

    v Use the following process to identify the type of startup problem that is occurring and to find the information you need to troubleshoot the problem:

    v Turn off the computer and unplug the power cord from the power outlet.

    v Reset the power: with the power cord unplugged, press and hold the power button on the front of the computer for 5 seconds.

    v Plug the power cord into the power outlet.

    v Press the power button to turn on the computer and note what happens.

    v If the computer successfully opens to Windows, the problem may be related to a temporary firmware lockup and may never happen again. Continue using the computer normally. If the problem occurs again, test the computer hardware, such as the hard drives, memory, and processor,Using PC Doctor to help determine if a hardware component has failed.

    v If the computer makes no fan noise, has no lights on the front of the PC, and does not display anything on the monitor , the computer is not distributing power correctly. Turn the computer off, unplug the power cord and refer to the HP support document Troubleshooting Power Supply Issues to troubleshoot power supply problems.

    v If the computer powers on but makes beeping sounds, a keyboard key is stuck, a memory DIMM or hard drive cable is not properly seated, or a hardware failure has occurred. Disconnect the mouse and keyboard and try to start the computer again. If the beeping noise stops, repair or replace the mouse or keyboard that is causing the problem. If a beep code continues, use the HP support document BIOS Beep Codes and Error Message Descriptions to troubleshoot further.

    v If the computer starts but the monitor has a blank screen , the video hardware on the computer may be causing the problem or the monitor may be defective. Use the HP support document The Monitor is Blank after Starting the Computer .

    v If the computer starts to a black screen with only a mouse pointer arrow , a file named lsasse.exe may be damaged. This problem can be resolved by using the HP support document Computer Starts to Black Screen With Only a White Arrow.

    v If an error message displays on the screen , search HP Customer Care using the exact text in the error message and then troubleshoot the problem using any support documents that are found.

    v If you are not able to identify or resolve the problem, continue to the next step to apply further troubleshooting.

  • Inderpal Singh
    Inderpal Singh Jul 28, 2008

    Step 3: Checking if the hard drive is detected

    v First, determine if the hard drive is being detected in the BIOS. Doing so, will help determine if the problem is related to hardware or software:

    v Before you begin, disconnect everything from the computer (such as USB devices, printers, floppy disks, and CD/DVD discs) and leave the mouse, monitor and keyboard connected.

    v Turn on the computer and press the F1 key repeatedly to enter the BIOS Setup Utility.

    v Find the hard drive name from the listing of channels or drives. Look for a name next to Primary Master or from the channel device listing (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and so on). To help you find the drive name, some common examples of hard drive names are:

    v [MAXTOR 6Y160M0]

    v [SAMSUNG SV8004H]

    v [ST3120026AS]

    v [WDC WD800AB-22CB]



    v Note: - It may be difficult to determine between a hard drive and a CD/DVD drive. In many cases, depending on the version of BIOS, you can select the name of the device next to a channel and press ENTER. Doing so may provide more helpful information that can help you determine if it is a hard drive.

  • Inderpal Singh
    Inderpal Singh Jul 28, 2008

    Figure 1:Example of a hard drive listed in the BIOS












  • Inderpal Singh
    Inderpal Singh Jul 28, 2008

    Figure 1:Example of a hard drive listed in the BIOS

    v Go the appropriate section of this document, depending on what was found:

    v If a hard drive name is listed, refer to the steps in the section Step 4: Hard drive detected .
    If you cannot find a hard drive name, that is, the text [Auto] , [NOT DETECTED] or [None] is listed next to Primary Master or First/Second/Third Channel Device 0, leave the BIOS Setup screen open and refer to the steps in the section Step 5: Hard Drive is not detected

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If you want to reinstall the operating system you just need to access the BIOS and set the first boot device as the CDrmo drive then before you reboot the computer put the installation CD for your Windows operating system then that way you can reinstall tha operating system......

Hope that helps.............

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

  • Mark Gil
    Mark Gil Jul 28, 2008

    If you have a overheating problem you just add some fan on your CPU tower to avoid any overheating problem...

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Will your computer boot from a rescue disk or the installation disk for the operating system? As the system was functioning for a few days and then stopped your operating system has somehow been corrupted and mist be reinstalled. You may have tried to install a new program or driver that most likely corrupted your operating system. Think back to what you may have installed that caused this problem. It may have been just a random process failure during the installation. Make sure when you are installing new programs or drivers that no programs are running in the back ground as this will cause problems like you are explaining.
If you can boot from the optical drive, re install your operating system. Make sure you do a fresh install and reformat the hard drive fully. Do not select the quick format option, this may leave troublesome artifacts behind.
If you can not access your optical drive at all, Remove your new video card and replace it with the old one. This should help you regain access to your optical drive. If you need more assistance feel free to ask me here or my email address is geokohler@gmail.com I will call you for free and walk you through any of the other possible solutions to remedy your problems. I hope you find this helpful.
George

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

  • George Kohler
    George Kohler Jul 28, 2008

    If you need a walk through of the entire solution to your problem I will call you for free and tell you exactly what you need to do to reinstall your operating system. Send me your phone number to my E-mail address.

  • George Kohler
    George Kohler Jul 28, 2008

    It sounds like the guy is trying to rip you off and sell you another motherboard. I cant type anymore right now but if you need more help send me your number and I will help you for free later. I do not know why people keep sending you long lists of things to do like you are a computer engineer. What you need is an engine to talk you through what your options are and how to get it working live.
    Anyway, Send me an E-mail with your number before someone tells you how to build a new mother board from spare refrigerator parts. LOL
    George


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A disk boot error means that there is an operating system load error 90% of the time I have seen.

Fix:

Make sure cables are connected from hard drive to motherboard.

Reinstall Operating System. This will reconfigure the boot.ini file that tells the computer what to load.

If this does not work let me know please.

Thanks, hope this helps ya!

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

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What is the message you are getting?

Posted on Jul 28, 2008

  • Kevin Shafer
    Kevin Shafer Jul 28, 2008

    Sorry, it's in the title. lol.

    When you are in BIOS, does your drive show up there?


  • Kevin Shafer
    Kevin Shafer Jul 28, 2008

    He said it was already a new hard drive which means a new operating system.

    If the cable is connected tightly on your hard drive and to your motherboard, then swap out the cable from your hard drive to your motherboard.


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  1. The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.
  2. When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
  3. The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  4. The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
  5. The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
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  8. The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
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  10. The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
  11. The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
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  • Jul 21, 2008 | Computers & Internet

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