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Residential Electrical Wiring Current NEC

What are NEC requirements as to Residential Wiring color codes and what NEC Section makes specific reference to ?
Thanks in advance for any help !

Eugene H. Brown
Charlotte, NC 28262
agenohb@hotmail.com

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240 to breaker panel,splits into 2- 120volt legs,breakers attach to these, black wires hook to breakers(hot), white wires(com) hook to a common insulated from box bar bus, green wires(grnd) hook to a common bus bar that screws to breaker box, ground cable bolts to ground bus bar, other end bolts to a 6ft copper coated steel rod 5/8" in diameter driven into the ground,black/white/green

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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On a 120/240Volt single phase system is:

Black = 1st phase
Red = 2nd phase
White = neutral
Green or Bare = ground

3 phase is the same with the third phase being blue.

Posted on Sep 08, 2009

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Our dishwasher has two grey and one green wire but the instructions say there should be a white, black, and green one. How do we figure out which wire is which?


The green is the earth. If the other two are the same colour, I guess the polarity positive and negative doesn't matter. What does the Bosch installation instructions say?

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/220-wiring-color-code-interpretation

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Tip

AFCI-GFCI Circuit Breakers - Your Home’s Electric Service has Never Been Safer


Would you ever consider driving a vehicle without functional brakes? Probably not. Driving such a vehicle is simply too dangerous and yet the majority of Americans do something every day that is potentially more dangerous than driving a car with no brakes. We live with home electrical service that is not nearly as safe as it should be. As a result, thousands are killed or seriously injured by electrical malfunction, electrocution and electrical fires every year. What's even more alarming is that most homeowners are unaware of this sobering fact or assume making their home's electrical service safer is unaffordable. Thankfully a recent breakthrough in residential electrical service technology is making it easier and more affordable than ever for homeowners to protect their families from electrocution, electrical fires and other deadly electrical safety hazards.

The Problem with Your Home's Electrical Service
The majority of homes in the U.S. today are approximately 40 years old and unless they have had their electrical service updated to the latest National Electric Code (NEC), they contain either fuses or traditional circuit breakers in their electrical panels. While fuses and circuit breakers look and function differently, they both serve the same purpose. They interrupt the flow of electricity to a circuit in your home if they sense an overload or electrical short.
For decades fuses and circuit breakers have been the main electrical safety component of most home electrical services. The problem with traditional fuses and circuit breakers that most people are unaware of is that they don't provide protection from some of the most common and most deadly of residential electrical hazards, electrical fires and electrocution.
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reported that in 2011 that nearly 2000 people were killed or injured in home electrical fires alone. This doesn't include the countless others killed or seriously injured as a result of accidental electrocution. What's worse is that most homeowners are unaware that almost all of these deaths and injuries can now be prevented by an inexpensive and revolutionary new type of circuit breaker, known as the AFCI/GFCI or Dual Function circuit breaker.

What are Arc Faults and Ground Faults and why are they so dangerous?
The acronym AFCI stands for Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter and this device is designed to cut the flow of electricity when it senses an arc fault. If you have ever plugged in an extension cord or flipped a light switch and heard a loud popping sound, then you have experienced an arc fault. The sound that you hear is actually electricity jumping from one electrical contact in the plug or switch to another. Though this might seem harmless, an arc fault causes an excessive amount of heat in your home's wiring which, over time, can actually melt the wiring's insulation leaving the wire exposed. This can lead to an electrical fire. Since the majority of your home's wiring is hidden behind its walls, it's almost impossible to know if your home is at risk.
GFCI stands for Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter. Much like an AFCI, a GFCI is designed to cut the flow of electricity to a circuit; however a GFCI is triggered not by an electrical arc, but rather a ground fault. This is when electricity travels outside of its intended path as it tries to find the shortest path to ground. An example of this is when a person with a live electrical wire touches the ground or something resting on the ground that can conduct electricity. The electrical current will travel through the person's body as it seeks the shortest path to ground, electrocuting them in the process. It only takes 1/10 of an amp to kill a human being. To give you an idea of just how little power that is, the average 60 watt household light bulb draws 5 times the power needed to kill a person.

Why are these dual function AFCI/GFCI circuit breakers so important?
Prior to the development to the AFCI/GFCI circuit breaker if the NEC called for a specific area in the home to be AFCI and GFCI protected, typically laundry rooms and kitchens, to have both AFCI protection and GFCI protection electricians had to use a GFCI outlet and an AFCI circuit breaker to meet this requirement. The problem was that this was rather inefficient and troublesome, especially when the circuit was tripped because the homeowner had to check both the outlet and the circuit breaker to see which had tripped and then reset it. Not only does the dual function AFCI/GFCI circuit breaker eliminate this problem, it also provides better protection and can be installed on every circuit in your home quickly and easily for ultimate protection. Residential Electrician

on Jun 05, 2015 | General Electric Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

It has two grey and one green wire but the instructions tell us black, white, and green


Dishwasher GFCI Requirement ' Electrical Construction ...

ecmweb.com > Forums > Electrical 101 > National Electrical Code (NEC) Mar 4, 2014 - 18 posts - ‎13 authors Sounds like I have to install a GFCI breaker to protect the entire branch ... National Electrical Code (NEC) > Dishwasher GFCI Requirement ...

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Feb 28, 2016 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

I want to step up the voltage of a 12voltt battery to 110 in order to power a dc motor with a dc volt of 110v


You can purchase a commercial inverter that will convert the voltge for you. This is a source I found on the web: http://aconinc.com/index.php?route=common/home
I am not familiar with them but they give you some options.

CAUTION:Electrical work and repairs can be dangerous, especially around water. There is a risk of shock or electrocution, which could result in serious injury or death. We strongly advise that hot tub electrical wiring be referred to a licensed electrician. Local code requirements for wiring vary and may differ from the educational examples on this web site. The local code regulations must be followed, with permits and inspections obtained. The installer should read and follow the hot tub owner's manual and associated electrical component owner's manuals and instructions.

Watts is Watts plus some loss. Take your load voltage (motor) times its current that will give you the watts. Then divide that number by the source voltage (battery). Multiply by about 1.2 to pick up losses, that gives you an approximation of the wattage required from your source. Divide that number by the voltage that will give you the current required by your load. When you make the connections be sure the wire sizing is large enough especially on the low voltage (battery) side.

Nov 04, 2013 | Tools & Hardware - Others

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What is the grounding requirements for a residential home?


Depending on your locality, these requirements may differ from what is specified by the National Electrical Code (NEC or "code"). The NEC is commonly regarded as the minimum requirements for electrical installations, and many states adopt it without modification as their requirements, too. Still others modify it and some counties and towns further modify the code. It is for these reasons, you should consult your local code enforcement office to learn what the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) wants to see when (s)he inspects the work.

Typically, an 8' grounding electrode (or ground rod) is driven into the ground and an approved clamp is used to secure an unspliced grounding electrode conductor to the neutral bar in the meter socket or service entrance equipment. The size of this conductor is based on the service entrance (SE) conductors. Typical sizes are when:

100 amp SE conductors are #4 copper (CU) or #2 aluminum (AL), requires a #8 CU or #6 AL grounding electrode conductor.

150 amp SE conductors that are #1 CU or 2/0 AL require a #6 CU or #4 AL grounding electrode conductor.

200 amp SE conductors that are 2/0 or 3/0 CU or 4/0 or 250 AL require a #4 CU or #2 AL grounding electrode conductor.

You may be required to provide a secondary grounding electrode if you can not provide data supporting minimum soil resistivity to the AHJ.

Lastly, bonding of the residence's cold water pipes is required. A #8 is used for 100 amp services and #6 for up to 200 amp services. If on a public water supply, the bonding conductor must be connected on the street side of the meter and the house side of the meter (should the meter be removed there will be no voltage present to injure the person removing the meter) to the grounding electrode conductor termination bar in the meter socket or ground bar in the service entrance equipment. Installation and connection of an IBT (Intersystem Bonding Terminal) is required for telephone, cable TV, etc. You may need to bond gas piping and metal duct work., and some locations specifically prohibit bonding one or more of these items.

The short of this is you must determine the requirements of your locality. The AHJ can tell what they are - but will probably not tell you how to do it.

I hope this was helpful.

Feb 23, 2012 | Hammering

1 Answer

Wiring 12/2 or 12/3


12/2 cable (Romex, UF, etc) consists of two insulated #12 and one uninsulated #12 conductor or wire. The two insulated wires have a black and a white colored insulation. Number 12 copper is rated for 20 amps. This cable can carry a single circuit with ground.

12/3 cable is identical to 12/2 with the exception being that it has a third insulated conductor that is colored red. This third wire allows one cable to supply 2 circuits (one on black and one on red with both sharing the white and ground wires) with one cable run. It is much cheaper to buy and install a single 12/3 cable than two 12/2 cables to get two circuits into the same general area.

Twenty amp 120 volt circuits in dwelling units are required for kitchens, dining rooms, washers, disposals, and other appliances that require more than 12 amps (but less than 16 amps) to operate. Twenty amp 240 volt circuits are typically for specialty appliances and devices such as electric heaters, pumps, etc. Generally, 20A/240V appliances devices do not need a 12/3 cable as they only require connections for Line1, Line2 and ground. One insulated conductor would be unused in a 12/3 cable serving such a device. A 12/2 cable is run instead and the white wire is taped red (any color other than gray or green, to indicated that it is no longer a neutral) at each location it is accessible, such as wiring compartments, panels and junction boxes.

Circuits fed by 12/2 cables will connect to single pole circuit breakers and those fed by 12/3 cables must be connected to double pole circuit breakers. Check the National Electrical Code (NEC) to determine which locations require GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) supplied circuits. The latest (2012) NEC requires most new circuits in dwelling units (residential) to be protected by AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) type circuit breakers. Consult your local building department to find out if the NEC has been adopted in your locality before installing.

Lastly, a 12/3 cable would be run between 3 way & 4 way light switches and hard wired smoke detectors; but only if they are on a 20 amp circuit. Most circuits in the home are 15 amp capacity, especially for lighting circuits. A 14/3 cable would be run on these circuits as there is no need for the additional expense of a cable with the larger #12 wires and the increased labor to handle, install and connect the wires to device terminals.

I hope this helps. Please rate my reply - thanks!

Jan 18, 2012 | Siemens Hammering

1 Answer

Which color gets hooked up to what on a ceiling fan


For residential wiring, some basic rules given in the NEC are:
  • Phase wire in a circuit may be black, red, orange (high leg delta) insulated wire, sometimes other colors, but never green, gray, or white (whether these are solid colors or stripes). Specific exceptions apply, such as a cable running to a switch and back (known as a traveler) where the white wire will be the hot wire feeding that switch. Another is for a cable used to feed an outlet for 250VAC 15 or 20 amp appliances that do not need a neutral, there the white is hot (but should be identified as being hot, usually with black tape inside junction boxes).
  • The neutral wire is identified by gray or white insulated wire, perhaps with stripes.
  • Grounding wire of circuit may be bare or identified insulated wire of green or having green stripes. Note that all metallic systems in a building are to be bonded to the building grounding system, such as water, natural gas, HVAC piping, and others.
  • Larger wires are furnished only in black; these may be properly identified with suitable paint or tape.
  • All wiring in a circuit except for the leads that are part of a device or fixture must be the same gauge. Note that different size wires may be used in the same raceway so long as they are all insulated for the maximum voltage of any of these circuits.
  • The Code gives rules for calculating circuit loading.
  • Ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection is required on receptacles in wet locations. This includes all small appliance circuits in a kitchen, receptacles in a crawl space, basements, bathrooms and a receptacle for the laundry room, as well as outdoor circuits within easy reach of the ground. However, they are not required for refrigerators because unattended disconnection could cause spoilage of food, nor for garbage disposals. Instead, for refrigerators and other semi-permanent appliances in basements and wet areas, use a one-outlet non-GFCI dedicated receptacle. Two-wire outlets having no grounding conductor may be protected by an upstream gfci and must be labelled "no grounding". Most GFCI receptacles allow the connection and have GFCI protection for down-stream connected receptacles. Receptacles protected in this manner should be labeled "GFCI protected".
  • Most circuits have the metallic components interconnected with a grounding wire connected to the third, round prong of a plug, and to metal boxes and appliance chassis.
  • Furnaces, water heaters, heat pumps, central air conditioning units and stoves must be on dedicated circuits
  • The code provides rules for sizing electrical boxes for the number of wires and wiring devices in the box.
The foregoing is just a brief overview and must not be used as a substitute for the actual National Electrical Code.

Jan 29, 2011 | Hampton Bay 54 In. Flemish Pewter Ceiling...

1 Answer

Can a combination microwave/convection/exhaust fan appliance which draws 1500 volts and has a 3 prong grounded plug be hard wired to panel and what size of copper wire to use


I assume that you mean 1500 Watts ?

which is 6.25 amps UK or 13.6 amps US

1.5mm UK 14 Gauge US

The National Electrical Code [NEC] requires their own cable sizing for premises wiring. Refer to the NEC rules to determine building wiring, as this page relates to electronic equipment wiring. For reference, the ampacity of copper wire at 300C for common wire sizes
14 AWG may carry a maximum of 20 Amps in free air, or 15 Amps as part of a 3 conductor cable.
12 AWG may carry a maximum of 25 Amps in free air, or 20 Amps as part of a 3 conductor cable.
10 AWG may carry a maximum of 40 Amps in free air, or 30 Amps as part of a 3 conductor cable.
8 AWG may carry a maximum of 70 Amps in free air, or 50 Amps as part of a 3 conductor cable.

Feb 18, 2010 | Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

Trying to install a remote start & keyless entry. I need to know where all the wires from the ignition harness go too???


First you will need to research your vehicles under-dash wiring schematic to identify your object wires, color code and function. The schematic may be found in a Y.M.M.(year,make & model) specific, electrical wiring manual. A related search on the internet, or at your local auto dealerships parts department. Then cross-reference and record your vehicles color coded leads to the remote starts color coded leads with respect to their function.

Hope this helps,,,Good luck
Aduz

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