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Broken connector in subwoofer connection on receiver

How do I remove the broken piece of my monster RCA cable that remains inside the subwoofer connection of my receiver? Or, is there another output channel I can use for my subwoofer from my Pioneer VSX-91TXH Elite receiver? My subwoofer is an Infinity, powered with low level input for left and right, and high level left and right (which I've never used)

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  • corisha Jul 27, 2008

    I was able to remove the broken connector and plug the cable into the subwoofer connection on the receiver, however, I'm not getting any sound from the subwoofer. The green ready light is on...but no response when I play a blu ray movie. Any ideas?

  • corisha Jul 27, 2008

    I was able to vacuum out the broken piece. thanks! But, the subwoofer is not responding now. Do I need to reset something?

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Opened my pioneer vsx 49txi when my subs stopped workig it look like the solder connection broke free from the circut board is ths expensive to fix?

Posted on Feb 13, 2009

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  • Master
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Dear sir/madam,

Take all that bulk cable and turn it into something useful with a connector kit. Or replace a broken connector instead of buying a whole new cable. you're not supposed to try and pull them straight off. Instead, twist them clockwise while firmly (but carefully) pulling straight out. They'll come off with no problem.


thanks
good luck


"Don't forget to rate the solution"

Posted on Jul 27, 2008

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The problem you now have can be one of two things most likely. One is, the RCA jack on the receiver has some broken solder connection causing no output from it. Two, the Pioneer receiver is not set properly with the sub-woofer output activated.

You can check the sub-woofer output to see if it is activated thru the menu system.

The solder connection being broken would need to be checked visually by removing the board the sub woofer RCA jack is on.

If both of these do not work for you or you can not do it, then you can try hooking the sub-woofer up differently. The only other option for you would be, to connect the subwoofer with the speaker level outputs of your receiver from the front "A" speakers. Get some speaker wire and connect them directly from the receiver "A" speaker output and run those speaker wires into the speaker wire inputs of the sub-woofer. Then you should have a speaker wire output from the sub-woofer to run to the 2 front speakers that were connected to the "A" speakers previously. That way you have volume control over the sub-woofer when you use the volume control on the Pioneer.

There is another way to connect this, but you would not have volume control over the sub-woofer with the Pioneer, only thru the sub-woofer gain control. That would not be a very good way, but you can do it by connecting the RCA jacks from the sub-woofer input to the TAPE REC output of the receiver. You could at least do this so you can check and make sure the sub-woofer is working properly.

You most likely have some broken solder joints on the RCA output of the Pioneer, since you had a broken RCA connector stuck in it, it would be likely that it also broke the solder connection on the board where the RCA jack is connected.

Posted on Jul 27, 2008

  • Dave DeGain
    Dave DeGain Jul 27, 2008

    By the way, you can not reset this receiver by unplugging it for 30 minutes. You would need to unplug it for about a week or two for it to reset. It is not like many other types electronic equipment where unplugging it will reset the unit.



    It has a capacitor in the circuit for the micro that stays charged for at least a week or more even after unplugging it. This capaitor is used like a battery in the micro's circuit and is of suficient value to keep the memory settings with the unit unplugged.



    Go ahead and try to reset it by unplugging it, you will notice that the tuner will still be set to the same station after you plug it back in. That is proof that it did not reset. After a reset, the tuner will be set at some random frequency, not the station you left it on when you unplugged it.



    There is no reset procedure for this model, the only way to reset it, is to be able to do a hard reset on the micro. This means you must ground out the supply voltage momentarily at the micro, or to force the reset pin on the micro to change states from it's current state.



    I work at an authorized Pioneer service center and I actually fix these type of units every day, so my knowledge of this type of thing is pretty extensive.

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Hi,
As per the user manual , the receiver has only one sub-woofer connector. The other alternative is to use the digital audio output for the speakers . That would mean either you have to change the speakers or get a conversion box that would connect your analog speakers to the digital output.
The other thing that can be done is to replace the sub-woofer connector. The same can be done by a radio repair guy or you can take it an authorised pioneer repair centre.


Thanks
proton


source:http://hometheater.about.com/od/avreceiversreviews/gr/piovsx91txhs.htm

Posted on Jul 27, 2008

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The only thing you do is to open your receivers,then locate the output connector if you see the female RCA jack ,then push it out the broken piece ,that's it

Posted on Jul 27, 2008

  • 1 more comment 
  • LORETO LACARON
    LORETO LACARON Jul 27, 2008

    Click for the sample video,when it open ,the SX-580 what
    inside and the VSX-LX50 demonstrating how to use the connection,if your Pioneer VSX-91TXH Elite receiver has an extra composite video connection,you can connect there..
    Pioneer
    SX-580 repair





    Pioneer VSX-LX50 HD Receiver Video

    http://www.doorone.co.uk/xGS-Pioneer%252...">Pioneer
    Repair
    ?






  • LORETO LACARON
    LORETO LACARON Jul 27, 2008

    This the picture of your Pioneer VSX-91TXH Elite receiver ,there is a three screw side by side six all in all.

  • LORETO LACARON
    LORETO LACARON Jul 27, 2008

    Yes its better you reset the unit unplug the unit for 30 minutes and re plug again...

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1 Answer

Loud hum from subwoofer


The number-one cause of subwoofer/speaker hum is the coaxial cable connecting your cable or satellite receiver to your provider (either through an inground run to a cable box or through a satellite dish). Here is how you test for this:
  1. Turn your system on and get it to produce the hum by watching a movie. Pause your DVD or videotape so that the hum is all you hear.
    TIPDon't use a normal cable or satellite program for this; you're about to disconnect the cable that provides the audio and video for your cable/satellite feed.
  2. Find the coaxial cable running from your cable or satellite receiver to your service provider, and while listening to the hum, unscrew the connector and disconnect the cable.
Did the hum stop or reduce by a large amount? If so, the cable you disconnected is the source of the noise. If this is the problem, you have several ways to fix the issue permanently (if not, jump ahead to the next section):
  1. Call your cable or satellite company and ask for a service call. Sometimes you get a smart cable guy, and if you demonstrate the problem he can do something upstream to ground the coaxial cable and remove or reduce the hum.
  2. Buy a power strip that has F connectors as part of its surge protection. Plug the strip into the AC outlet and feed your main coaxial signal through these connectors. This ties the shielding of the coax (the source of the noise) to your AC ground and sometimes can solve the problem.
    WARNINGOddly enough, this solution (surge protection) can sometimes increase the humming.
  3. Go to your local RadioShack store and buy three inexpensive items: a Matching Transformer (part #15-1253), an Indoor/Outdoor Matching Transformer (#15-1140), and a Cable Coupler (#278-304). Connect your coaxial cable to the cable coupler, and then to the first matching transformer. The output is two screws for the old two-wire antenna wire. Your indoor/outdoor matching transformer has two connectors for the screws, and the other end is a coaxial connector. Hook your cable or satellite receiver into this connector and see if the hum goes away.
Here is why this trick works: the first transformer converts your 75-ohm coax into a 300-ohm antenna connector. The second transformer converts the 300-ohm back to a 75-ohm connector. The humming, which usually is at around 60 Hz, can't pass through these conversions.

Ground Loop Hum

The second cause of hum is called a ground loop, and it almost always shows up right after you bring home a brand-new, self-powered subwoofer, or perhaps an external amplifier.
Take a look at all the plugs on the power cords on your home theater equipment. In most systems, the receiver (or amplifier) has a three-prong power plug, but most of your other devices have only two-prong plugs. This is not by accident; the device with the three-prong power plug is grounded. This means that device "owns" the ground. As long as no other power device has a three-prong plug, everything works well.
When you bring home a self-powered subwoofer and plug it in, though, you might notice it has a three-prong plug; this is for safety reasons. However, when you connect an RCA cable from your receiver to your subwoofer and turn everything on, you suddenly notice a loud hum.
The external amplifier in your subwoofer is now fighting with the amplifier in your receiver for possession of the ground. Both devices want to define 0.00 volts. But because the wiring in the two amplifiers to your household AC ground is different, one device is really using 0.001 volt and the other device uses something closer to 0.003 volts. The subwoofer cable connects the two, and the fighting begins.
You have to stop these two devices from trying to own the ground, or get them to not "see" each other. First, make your system produce the humming noise. Disconnect the single RCA cable between your receiver and subwoofer. Did the noise stop? If so, you have a ground loop issue.
The proper, safest way to solve this problem is to buy a special subwoofer cable with little arrows on the wire to show the signal direction (see ).
[img src="http://oreilly.com/images/hacks/htheaterhks/figs/htheaterhks_0601.jpg">
Figure 1. Subwoofer cable with directional arrowUnfortunately, many people have been ridiculed when asking about these sorts of cables at their local electronics store: "But cables don't really have a direction. My expert friend at work laughed at me when I asked about this!" Yes, your friend is right. Cables don't have a direction, but these little arrows indicate that this cable will prevent or solve your ground loop problem.
Remember when I said the hum started when you connected the RCA cable? That RCA cable really contains two wires: the center wire and something called the shield. The center wire carries the audio signal, but the shield tries to define 0.00 volts. The shield is the wire that lets the two different components (the receiver or amplifier, and the subwoofer) see each other's ground, and causes the fight. What if you took your subwoofer cable and disconnected the shielding from just one end? Wouldn't that solve the problem? Yes, it would. This is exactly what a subwoofer cable with little arrows does. The shield is not connected at both ends. The shield has to be connected at one end, for connecting to your receiver or amp, so you should run the cable so that the arrows show the flow from the receiver to the subwoofer.
WARNINGIt is unsafe to use a two-prong to three-prong "cheater" plug on the subwoofer power cord to solve the hum problem. Even if the subwoofer came with a cheater plug in the box, it's REALLY not safe to do. Don't do it.

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Prove it will work with a low-level source. Or try Auto Off.

FAQ's

http://www.jensenspeakers.com.au/page/shop/info_page/a/infopage_id/e/22

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