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Types of Tapes Use in a Server Backup Process

HI ther, may I ask if what are the kinds or types of tapes are being used in a data center or a server. Is it the tapes used in making a back up?

Thank you!

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Magnetic striped tapes

Posted on Aug 31, 2008

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I inherited a Windows 2000 server. They use the backup program that came with windows 2000. Thursdays tape broke about 3 months ago. Every way that I have tried to replace it has failed. I have done lots...


Have you tried remaking the backup job? its a simple job action

LOoks to me like those files are either missing, OR the tape drive no longer recognizes the tapes

Mar 16, 2011 | Microsoft Windows 2000 Server

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Here are some of the best practices to take into consideration in any backup &...


Here are some of the best practices to take into consideration in any backup & recovery system:
  • Usually perform system state backups of your servers frequently. Each computer on a Windows network has a corresponding computer account in Active Directory. Like a user account, the computer account has an associated password. The difference is that the password is assigned, and periodically changed, by Windows. If you try to restore a system state backup that is too old, the computer account password that is stored in the backup will no longer match the password that is bound to the computer account in Active Directory. As a result, the machine won't be able to participate in the domain. There are workarounds, but it is usually easier to just make frequent system state backups of your servers, & use these backups to recover the servers when needed.
  • Always backup the data, the server's operating system, & the applications installed on the server. Although it is true that, if a server fails and you need to perform a full recovery, you can reinstall the operating system & the applications & then restore any data. However, time is of the essence when trying to recover from a crash. It is much faster to restore everything from backup than it is to manually install an operating system and a set of applications. More important, it is often difficult to manually configure a server so that it matches its previous configuration. Backing up the entire server ensures that its configuration will be exactly as it was before the crash.
  • Periodically test your backups to make sure you are able to use them for recovery when the disaster strikes. Always remember that we perform backups in order to be able to restore from then when we need to. So, we have to make sure our backups are usable.
  • For some applications (for example, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Exchange Server, Lotus Domino Server, ... etc), a file-level backup is insufficient. These applications usually utilize open databases that need a special backup agent to back them up consistently while they are being in-use. Usually make sure that you are using the correct backup agent needed by your application.
  • While you should keep backups off site, consider waiting until the end of the business day to remove the previous night's tapes from the building. This way, if your server fails early during the day, you will not have to wait for hours till you can get the tapes on-site again & start the recovery.
  • Construct your backup architecture in a way that avoids (at least as much as possible) having a single point of failure. If possible, have a backup for your backups, or configure 2 independent backup schedules to run everyday.
  • Do not rely solely on a disk-to-disk backup solution. Although disk-to-disk backup solutions offer many advantages over traditional tape backups, they should not be the only backup solution to rely upon. In such a scenario, the backup server is prone to the same risks as the servers it protects. A hurricane, lightning strike, fire, or flood could wipe out your backup server along with your other servers. For this reason, it is important to dump the contents of your disk based backups to tape on a frequent basis, and then store those tapes in an off-site secure storage.
  • When deciding to replace your current backup technology with a newer one, do not get rid of the old tapes, tape device(s) & backup software. At least, do not do this unless you are sure that your newer tape device(s) support the older tapes, or that you have moved the older backups to newer media supported by the newer tape device(s). This way, when it is required to retrieve data from the old backups, you will be able easily to retrieve the required data. This also could apply to the older backup software if the newer backup application does not support the older tapes or tape device(s).
  • There is no denying that it is important to secure your backups, but it is equally important to consider the consequences of your security measures. If you find yourself having to restore a backup after a major system failure, the last thing you need is an ill-conceived security mechanism standing in the way of the recovery. For example, if you are planning to use hardware-level encryption, do not forget (when time comes to upgrade your backup hardware) to make sure that your new hardware supports the previously used encryption.
  • Always use a long tape rotation scheme, or at least keeping some of your backup tapes as long-term archives.

on Jan 05, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

Backup Best Practices


Here are some of the best practices to take into consideration in any backup & recovery system:
  • Usually perform system state backups of your servers frequently. Each computer on a Windows network has a corresponding computer account in Active Directory. Like a user account, the computer account has an associated password. The difference is that the password is assigned, and periodically changed, by Windows. If you try to restore a system state backup that is too old, the computer account password that is stored in the backup will no longer match the password that is bound to the computer account in Active Directory. As a result, the machine won't be able to participate in the domain. There are workarounds, but it is usually easier to just make frequent system state backups of your servers, & use these backups to recover the servers when needed.
  • Always backup the data, the server's operating system, & the applications installed on the server. Although it is true that, if a server fails and you need to perform a full recovery, you can reinstall the operating system & the applications & then restore any data. However, time is of the essence when trying to recover from a crash. It is much faster to restore everything from backup than it is to manually install an operating system and a set of applications. More important, it is often difficult to manually configure a server so that it matches its previous configuration. Backing up the entire server ensures that its configuration will be exactly as it was before the crash.
  • Periodically test your backups to make sure you are able to use them for recovery when the disaster strikes. Always remember that we perform backups in order to be able to restore from then when we need to. So, we have to make sure our backups are usable.
  • For some applications (for example, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Exchange Server, Lotus Domino Server, ... etc), a file-level backup is insufficient. These applications usually utilize open databases that need a special backup agent to back them up consistently while they are being in-use. Usually make sure that you are using the correct backup agent needed by your application.
  • While you should keep backups off site, consider waiting until the end of the business day to remove the previous night's tapes from the building. This way, if your server fails early during the day, you will not have to wait for hours till you can get the tapes on-site again & start the recovery.
  • Construct your backup architecture in a way that avoids (at least as much as possible) having a single point of failure. If possible, have a backup for your backups, or configure 2 independent backup schedules to run everyday.
  • Do not rely solely on a disk-to-disk backup solution. Although disk-to-disk backup solutions offer many advantages over traditional tape backups, they should not be the only backup solution to rely upon. In such a scenario, the backup server is prone to the same risks as the servers it protects. A hurricane, lightning strike, fire, or flood could wipe out your backup server along with your other servers. For this reason, it is important to dump the contents of your disk based backups to tape on a frequent basis, and then store those tapes in an off-site secure storage.
  • When deciding to replace your current backup technology with a newer one, do not get rid of the old tapes, tape device(s) & backup software. At least, do not do this unless you are sure that your newer tape device(s) support the older tapes, or that you have moved the older backups to newer media supported by the newer tape device(s). This way, when it is required to retrieve data from the old backups, you will be able easily to retrieve the required data. This also could apply to the older backup software if the newer backup application does not support the older tapes or tape device(s).
  • There is no denying that it is important to secure your backups, but it is equally important to consider the consequences of your security measures. If you find yourself having to restore a backup after a major system failure, the last thing you need is an ill-conceived security mechanism standing in the way of the recovery. For example, if you are planning to use hardware-level encryption, do not forget (when time comes to upgrade your backup hardware) to make sure that your new hardware supports the previously used encryption.
  • Always use a long tape rotation scheme, or at least keeping some of your backup tapes as long-term archives.

on Jan 04, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

HI TLD tape drives are writing with low transfer rate. we are using veritas netbackup 6.5.3 verision


Hi,
The low throughput may be because of many factors. Check the below factors.. It could improve your throughput.
1. Restart and disable any antivirus firewall on both backup server and client. The network utilization should be more than 20% in the master backup server. Just to make sure there is no hinderence to data flow, try copying a single big file (a 1Gig ISO file will do) from any server to backup server, the network utilization should shoot above 10% then. And will vary to 20%. If it is steadt @ 8 or 10% then firewal is the culprit. Disable it.
2. Team 2 or 3 NICs in the master backup server. Teaming at the client will also help.
3. Check the total size of data to backup, and the average size and number of files to backup, if the average size is in the range of KBs and the number of files is very high. Then only the 'Flash Backup Liscence" will only help.
Please come back and post the ratings for my solution if it turn to be of any use to you. Thnx

Mar 15, 2010 | HP (DW017A) Ultrium Tape Drive

1 Answer

Symantec Backup Exec 11d compression


Unfortunately, the data types you described are already compressed.
Your hardware and software cannot compress it any further. In fact, compressing compressed files actually increases the file sizes. Don't worry, Backup Exec knows better than to compress compressed files so you can leave your settings in place.

The compressed capacity of a tape drive is a marketing ploy by the tape backup industry to make them more appealing. Yes, if your backup consisted entirely of uncompressed files you might get close to 75GB but never 80GB. You can only count on getting the uncompressed capacity of a tape.

Three options:
Obviously, a higher capacity tape drive will resolve this problem.
You could also swtich to using two tapes but you would have to load the second tape when you arrive for work in the morning and your backup would have to finish during the business day.
Finally, if you have some data that does not change frequently you could seperate it from your active data. Backup the active data on your regular backup. Now you can backup the "archived" data manually with a separate backup job. Once backed up you only have to back it up again when new data is added to the archive.

I hope this helps.

Jul 21, 2009 | Symantec VERITAS? Backup Exec 11 for...

1 Answer

Backup Problem


80GB is the non compressed and 160GB is fully compressed. Based on my experience youll never get a compression rate of more than 1.5 to 1, so you should expect to get more than 120GB on the tape.

The issue that you are having is that you are using the drivers that either are built into windows or came with the tape drive and not the driver from symantec.

Go into Tools->Wizards->Device Configuration Wizard and follow the step to "Install tape device drivers". This should take care of the compression issue.


Dec 09, 2008 | Dell PowerVault 110T DLT VS160 DLT Tape...

2 Answers

I am unable to get IBM UlTrium TD4 SCSI device drivers for windows 2000 server


Hi,

if you "have not" using Backup Software (e.g. Symantec Backup Exec, CA), you can try this IBM LTO-4 driver for Win2K.

IBM LTO-4 Device Driver for Windows 2000


Ned Huang
Tandberg Data Taiwan
Technical Support.

Oct 15, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Types of DATA


Backing up data is a simple proposition. You just need to know what the company is about and how the server is structured. Most of the time, if done correctly, there will be a users folder on the server located on anything but the main drive. All user data should be there and should, by default backed up. There will also be another folder, again depending on the company, where all the data would reside. Most of the types of files to be backed up would be email files. If Outlook, these would be their PST files. Any WORD or EXCEL files, extensions DOC (DOCX if Office 2007), and XLS respectively. You also need to know what software they will be using. If you don't know, now's not a good time to learn.

Jul 25, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Constant Cleaning of new PowerVault 100T DAT72


Tape drives do need cleaning frequently and the 'auto clean' facility may not be enough. The problem is the continuous shedding of oxide needs cleaning right off and the auto system may not be enough. What you need is a back-up Drive. and the out of service drive needs physically stripping down to clean all off using a soft brush and where appropriate coproponal alcohol

Jun 13, 2007 | Dell PowerVault 100T DAT72 DAT Tape Drive

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