Question about Canon PowerShot A75 Digital Camera

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The screen doesn't show any image focused at rather it shows greyish blinking patterns on the screen

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  • Anonymous Feb 16, 2009

    the screen shows diagonal colored lines , I cant take any picture

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  • Master
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See this link.

Posted on Jul 26, 2008

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Ripples appear in the image when photographing an object with fine plaids or stripes. How can I fix that?


When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red cross-stripes and black cross-stripes overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly. Reference You may find another Moire effect displayed on the LCD of the camera. As this is caused by the aligned pixels on the LCD, this effect does not necessarily appear in pictures you have taken.

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Picture ripples


The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the fine pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red stripes and black plaids overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly.

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1 Answer

Picture ripples


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1 Answer

What is moir?? (red/blue stripes)


Sometimes odd stripes or colors will appear in a digital image, either from a high-end digital camera, or from a scanned image. This effect is called moir? and is caused when a fine pattern in the subject (such as the weave in a fabric or very close, parallel lines in architecture) matches the pattern of the imaging chip. When two patterns meet, often a third, new pattern is created. This third pattern is called moir?. In order to reduce (or eliminate) moir?, a special anti-aliasing filter is mounted in the camera. If too strong a filter is mounted an overall soft image will be produced, but with no moir?. If a weaker filter is chosen the image will be sharper, but there is more of a chance for moir? to happen in some circumstances. Nikon has chosen to produce the sharpest image that can be made, even though there may be some moir? in parts of some images. To help reduce moir? there are many techniques to use: Change angle of camera. Since the angle of the camera and subject causes moir?, slightly changing the angle of the camera (by rotating the camera) can remove or change any moire that is present. Change camera position Again, changing the angle relationship by moving left or right, up or down can reduce moir?. Change focus point Moir? is caused by very sharp focus and high detail on fine patterns; slightly changing the focus point changes the sharpness and can help to remove moir?. Change lens focal length Different lenses or focal length settings can be used to alter or remove moir? Remove with software Nikon Capture (as well as several third-party, Adobe® Photoshop® plug-ins) can be used to remove any moir? that does appear in the final image. Of course it may not be possible to remove all moir? in all cases, but in general an overall clean, sharp image with slight moir? is preferred over a soft focus image. Moir? can happen with images from all digital cameras and scanners, but is more likely to happen with an SLR-type digital camera system because the lens, sensor and software are designed to produce the sharpest, most accurate image possible. When reviewing images to see if moir? is present be sure to be looking at the image on the computer screen (or the camera's LCD) at the full, 100% view. If you zoom out on-screen a false moir? can be produced by the pattern of the monitor grill.

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