Question about Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for PC

1 Answer

Types of DATA

Hi there,

I will be having an interview for a backup operations server position. And I dont know anything about backing up of data in a server.

I just want to ask what are the common data or types of data are going to be backed up for a server.

Or anything that you can help about managing a server.

thank you all

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 162 Answers

Backing up data is a simple proposition. You just need to know what the company is about and how the server is structured. Most of the time, if done correctly, there will be a users folder on the server located on anything but the main drive. All user data should be there and should, by default backed up. There will also be another folder, again depending on the company, where all the data would reside. Most of the types of files to be backed up would be email files. If Outlook, these would be their PST files. Any WORD or EXCEL files, extensions DOC (DOCX if Office 2007), and XLS respectively. You also need to know what software they will be using. If you don't know, now's not a good time to learn.

Posted on Jul 25, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Erlier my lap not getting shutdown after clicking shut don also; from yesterday its not booting only, i am getting blue screen error, and some time it shows virus problem along with bluescreen, i have some...


remove hard disk from laptop.
buy an external hard disk case for the laptop hdisk.
it comes with a usb connector.
install hdisk into the case.
plug into another computer and retrieve your data.

Mar 08, 2011 | Operating Systems

Tip

Backup Best Practices


Here are some of the best practices to take into consideration in any backup & recovery system:
  • Usually perform system state backups of your servers frequently. Each computer on a Windows network has a corresponding computer account in Active Directory. Like a user account, the computer account has an associated password. The difference is that the password is assigned, and periodically changed, by Windows. If you try to restore a system state backup that is too old, the computer account password that is stored in the backup will no longer match the password that is bound to the computer account in Active Directory. As a result, the machine won't be able to participate in the domain. There are workarounds, but it is usually easier to just make frequent system state backups of your servers, & use these backups to recover the servers when needed.
  • Always backup the data, the server's operating system, & the applications installed on the server. Although it is true that, if a server fails and you need to perform a full recovery, you can reinstall the operating system & the applications & then restore any data. However, time is of the essence when trying to recover from a crash. It is much faster to restore everything from backup than it is to manually install an operating system and a set of applications. More important, it is often difficult to manually configure a server so that it matches its previous configuration. Backing up the entire server ensures that its configuration will be exactly as it was before the crash.
  • Periodically test your backups to make sure you are able to use them for recovery when the disaster strikes. Always remember that we perform backups in order to be able to restore from then when we need to. So, we have to make sure our backups are usable.
  • For some applications (for example, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Exchange Server, Lotus Domino Server, ... etc), a file-level backup is insufficient. These applications usually utilize open databases that need a special backup agent to back them up consistently while they are being in-use. Usually make sure that you are using the correct backup agent needed by your application.
  • While you should keep backups off site, consider waiting until the end of the business day to remove the previous night's tapes from the building. This way, if your server fails early during the day, you will not have to wait for hours till you can get the tapes on-site again & start the recovery.
  • Construct your backup architecture in a way that avoids (at least as much as possible) having a single point of failure. If possible, have a backup for your backups, or configure 2 independent backup schedules to run everyday.
  • Do not rely solely on a disk-to-disk backup solution. Although disk-to-disk backup solutions offer many advantages over traditional tape backups, they should not be the only backup solution to rely upon. In such a scenario, the backup server is prone to the same risks as the servers it protects. A hurricane, lightning strike, fire, or flood could wipe out your backup server along with your other servers. For this reason, it is important to dump the contents of your disk based backups to tape on a frequent basis, and then store those tapes in an off-site secure storage.
  • When deciding to replace your current backup technology with a newer one, do not get rid of the old tapes, tape device(s) & backup software. At least, do not do this unless you are sure that your newer tape device(s) support the older tapes, or that you have moved the older backups to newer media supported by the newer tape device(s). This way, when it is required to retrieve data from the old backups, you will be able easily to retrieve the required data. This also could apply to the older backup software if the newer backup application does not support the older tapes or tape device(s).
  • There is no denying that it is important to secure your backups, but it is equally important to consider the consequences of your security measures. If you find yourself having to restore a backup after a major system failure, the last thing you need is an ill-conceived security mechanism standing in the way of the recovery. For example, if you are planning to use hardware-level encryption, do not forget (when time comes to upgrade your backup hardware) to make sure that your new hardware supports the previously used encryption.
  • Always use a long tape rotation scheme, or at least keeping some of your backup tapes as long-term archives.

on Jan 04, 2010 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

Reprogram without losing any data


Hi,

Please try restarting it in safe mode, please disconnect the Internet cable before restarting in safe mode.

It will help you backup your data to some external storage and also you can rectify your virus problem.

Thanks.

Mar 18, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

How to take a back up for active directory?


there is no backup for Active Directory only. you can backup the PDC or the BDC as a whole. or to backup the system state data.

Active Directory is same as registry. backup the AD will help you any when the machine goes down. you don't have the link to all of the services.

Dec 04, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Backup


Back UP, its a utility commonly used in all operating system to backing up our personal documents, pictures, videos,outlook mail boxes. It is a very useful tool to prevent the damage of disk drives.
we can backing up our data by using hard drives, cd-dvds, flash drives, tape drives,etc..

To know more about Back Up, use this link...

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/learnmore/bott_03july14.mspx


thank you.




Jul 23, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers

New to Exchange Server 2003


U mail is noted friend.. U all files and foeld is xchange the new Windows Server 2003, than no problem..

Feb 24, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

3 Answers

System State not successfully


This is common in the following OS.

• Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Web Edition • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86) • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86) • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise x64 Edition • Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 Premium Edition

This problem occurs when the following conditions are true: • You back up data from a volume that contains a Microsoft SQL Server database. • The recovery model of the SQL Server database is configured to use an option that is different from Simple.


Submit a request here to get a hotfix from Microsoft ( Its free and no product key will be asked )

http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=6294451

Feb 18, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Backup DHCP,AD of win 2000 .


How To Use the Backup Program to Back Up and Restore the System State in Windows 2000 var sectionFilter = "type != 'notice' && type != 'securedata' && type != 'querywords'"; var tocArrow = "/library/images/support/kbgraphics/public/en-us/downarrow.gif"; var depthLimit = 10; var depth3Limit = 10; var depth4Limit = 5; var depth5Limit = 3; var tocEntryMinimum = 1; .toc{display: none;} SUMMARY loadTOCNode(1, 'summary'); This article describes how you can optionally back up the system state in the Windows 2000 Backup program to back up and restore critical system data. When you choose to back up the system state on a domain controller, the following items are included: • Active Directory (NTDS) • The boot files • The COM+ class registration database • The registry • The system volume (SYSVOL)When you back up the system state on a non-domain controller, the following items are included: • The Boot file • The COM+ class registration database • The registryWhen you back up a member server or domain controller with Certificate Server installed, the following additional item is also included: • Certificate ServerWindows 2000 Backup can back up and restore Active Directory on Windows 2000 domain controllers. You can perform a backup operation while the domain controller is online. You can perform a restore operation only when the domain controller is booted into Directory Services Restore mode (by pressing the F8 key when the server is booting).

uparrow.gifBack to the top
How to Back Up the System State on a Domain Controller loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); 1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. 2. Click the Backup tab. 3. Click to select the System State check box. (All of the components to be backed up are listed in the right pane. You cannot individually select each item.)

NOTE: During the system state backup, you must select to back up the Winnt\Sysvol folder. You must also select this option during the restore operation to have a working sysvol after the recovery.The following information applies only to domain controllers. You can restore member servers the same way, but in normal mode.

If any of the following conditions are not met, the system state is not restored. Backup attempts to restore the system state, but does not succeed. • The drive letter on which the %SystemRoot% folder is located must be the same as when it was backed up. • The %SystemRoot% folder must be the same folder as when it was backed up. • If sysvol or other Active Directory databases were located on another volume, they must exist and have the same drive letters also. The size of the volume does not matter. uparrow.gifBack to the top
How to Restore the System State on a Domain Controller loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); 1. To restore the system state on a domain controller, first start the computer in Directory Services Restore Mode. To do so, restart the computer and press the F8 key when you see the Boot menu. 2. Choose Directory Services Restore Mode. 3. Choose the Windows 2000 installation you are going to recover, and then press ENTER. 4. At the logon prompt, supply the Directory Services Restore mode credentials you supplied during the Dcpromo.exe process. 5. Click OK to acknowledge that you are using Safe mode. 6. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. 7. Click the Restore tab. 8. Click the appropriate backup media and the system state to restore.

NOTE: During the restore operation, the Winnt\Sysvol folder must also be selected to be restored to have a working sysvol after the recovery process. Be sure that the advanced option to restore "junction points and data" is also selected prior to the restore. This ensures that sysvol junction points are re-created. 9. In the Restore Files to box, click Original Location.

NOTE: When you choose to restore a file to an alternative location or to a single file, not all system state data is restored. These options are used mostly for boot files or registry keys. 10. Click Start Restore. 11. After the restore process is finished, restart the computer.

Dec 02, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

4 Answers

Active directory


you can use in built ntbackup utility.

In a DC, in the Items to backup window, expand Mycomputer and you can see System state. select that and proceed. It will take the Active Directory data.

Nov 06, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for PC Logo

Related Topics:

57 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Microsoft Operating Systems Experts

Brian Sullivan
Brian Sullivan

Level 3 Expert

27725 Answers

Scott Fryer

Level 2 Expert

80 Answers

Alex Krenvalk

Level 2 Expert

401 Answers

Are you a Microsoft Operating System Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...