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WHEN REACHING PROPER SUBCOOLING IDSCHARGE LINE TEMP SHOULD BE 80DEG. OVER AMBIENT DISCHARGE LINE YOU MEAN LIQUID OR SUCTION LINE?

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1) this is not a question.
2) the subcooling temperature should not be 80 degrees above ambient.

Posted on Jul 24, 2008

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How do you put in 410a into Ac unit


You turn system on to cool setting and run temp down until outside unit comes on. Then you connect your suction side of your gauges to the suction side of your outdoor unit. Next you connect the liquid(high)side of your gauges to the liquid line on your outside unit(the little copper line). Connect the middle hose of your gauges to the 410a drum of refrigerant. Before opening the suction or low pressure side of the gauges you need to turn the drum upside down and turn drum of 410a on. Then you need a temp reading meter and clamp to read the temp of your liquid line(small line). While charging you want to make sure to release refrigerant slowly. The unit should call for a specified subcooling on unit plate. 7 to 10 degrees. You take the liquid line temp and subtract it from saturation temp on the high side of your gauges.(it'll be the pink numbers on the right side of your gauge.

Jun 05, 2013 | Heating & Cooling

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Charging an air conditioner by superheat or subcooling


Charging AC by superheat and subcool
First charging a unit by superheat, this is only for Acs with an orifice or capillary tube.
Optimum superheat is 12° to 15° at the compressor or suction line outside the unit.
Hook up your gages and put a thermometer on suction line (large line), start the AC. Measure the temperature of the suction line and read the pressure on your gages. Theres a temperature scale on your gages for R-22 or R-410A the needle will show you the pressure on the outer scale and if you follow it down to the R-22 or R-410a inner scale that is the saturation temperature for that refrigerant, (you can also use a temperature pressure chart), now read the thermometer, let’s say the suction temperature( the thermometer) is 67° and the saturation temperature (the gages or temp. press. Chart), is 55°, subtract the saturation temperature from the suction temperature, 67°- 55° = 12° superheat.
Charging by Subcooling, this is for Acs with a thermostatic expansion valve, it’s common to see a sight glass on the liquid line (on these units with a sight glass just clear it, when, indoor room is at approximate set point of the thermostat). If there is no sight glass then the Optimum sub cooling is 12° to 15° at the outdoor unit.
Hook up your gages and put a thermometer on liquid line (small line), start the AC. Measure the temperature of the liquid line and read the pressure on your gages. Theres a temperature scale on your gages for R-22 or R-410A the needle will show you the pressure on the outer scale and if you follow it down to the R-22 or R-410a inner scale that is the saturation temperature for that refrigerant,(you can also use a temperature pressure chart), now read the thermometer, let’s say the liquid temperature( the thermometer) is 100° and the saturation temperature (the gages or temp. press. Chart), is 114°, subtract the liquid temperature from the saturation temperature, 114°- 100° = 14° subcool.

This is also the only way to know if your a/c has the proper charge.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Hvac superheat verses subcooling


superheat is the difference of line temperture at suction of the compressor to the pressure converted to temperture for freon used in system. subcooling is the difference of temperture measured on liquid line compared to pressure measured at discharge line converted to temperture for the freon used in system.

Sep 06, 2012 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I have the correct Manifold Gauges for checking the low and high side of the heat pump. How do I read the gauges to ensure that my system has the right charge? Outside ambient temperature is 85.4.


In order to know if you have the correct charge you must measure the subcooling since it is a txv unit. The outside unit will have the proper subooling you need printed on the data plate. Hook up you gauges and let thebunit run for 10 minutes, after 10 minutes check the high side pressure, that high side pressure will correspond to a saturation temp, write that number down then measure the temp of the liquid line and subtract the saturation temp from the liquid line temp, it should be the same as printed on tjhe data plate if it is higher than that add refrigerant untill you get whtas printed on tne data plate. Is there is no data plate use 12 degrees of subcooling.

May 27, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Low charge?


System is running a 24°F superheat and a 0°F subcooling at those readings. Saturation temperature is approx. 30°F lower than return air temperature.

Indications are of a low system charge. Ensure all your filters are clean and there are no obstructions that are limited airflow across the evaporator coil. Ensure the coils are clean and not frozen up.

Have it checked out. Looks like a low charge but can't tell without being in front of it. As far as normal ranges, that all depends on many factors. Based upon the info you have supplied, I would guesstimate that the operating pressures would be in the neighborhood of 350/160 to start and get the subcooling and superheat in check.

Jul 31, 2010 | Weather King 12AJA3601AH Air Conditioner

2 Answers

UNIT IS ONLY 4 YEARS OLD AND IS ON ITS SECOND COMPRESSOR SUCTION PRESSURE SLOW ABOUT GOING DOWN AND DISCHARGE PRESSURE GOES TO 210 THEN WILL DROP TO 200 .UNIT HAS 10 DEGREES SUBCOOLING BUT SUPERHEAT IS...


Hi, sounds as though for this to be its 2nd compressor for such a newer unit, the superheat was not right when the compressor was installed. I don't know what freon you are using the new R-410A or the regular R-22. There's a big difference in pressure, but now I see your pressure reading and its R-22 for these readings.For a 2 ton unit, you would use the superheat charging method for a unit that doesn't use a thermostatic expansion valve ( T X V ) and not the sub-cooling. A 23 degree super heat at that outdoor ambient temperature is way to high for that unit, you will loose the compressor again!!. Super heat killed the compressor is the saying and that's a fact. Suction pressure should pull down just as quick as the head pressure unless the valves are going and weak, or you have a scroll compressor that has a valve plate that is going, or you are low on charge. With a ambient of 95*, you should be at around 270p.s.i. on your head pressure as 210 to 200 is way low. Suction line temp should be around 68 to 70, with a suction line temperature of 50 to 51 degrees, which would give you a 10 to 12 degree F super heat. I don't know when the second compressor was installed, but it has to be low on charge to be such a low head, and high super heat and you will loose this compressor again, its only a matter of time before you have a burnout. It was either under charged when installed, or has a very small leak at one of the joints. I hope the liquid line drier was replaced also. It shows me you have some knowledge on a/c operation, so you need to get that superheat down to between 8 and 10 degrees for this unit to cool properly, and leak check it also. Did you buy a extended compressor warranty? Lets get the head pressure up and superheat down and you should be OK unless the valves or valve plate is weak. Once you loose the valves, you will have a lower than normal head pressure and a high suction pressure. Compressor just won't pull down anymore. I hope I have been of help to you and ask of you to be kind when rating me. I will be here for you if and when you need me for anything.
Sincerely,
Shastalaker7
A/C & Heating Contractor

Jul 02, 2010 | Weather King 10AJA6001AH Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Goodman Condensor cplj48-1 Air handler Modle


It sounds undercharged (needs more refrigerant). Based on the conditions in your post and assuming the indoor humidity is within 20-70% range, your target superheat should be 10degF. Your superheat (assuming you have an R22 system) is far too high. The pressures are not indicating a restriction; therefore, I have to conclude you have a low charge. A low charge will cause a gurgling sound due to the refrigerant in the liquid line is vaporizing prior to reaching the Cap tube at the Air Handler.

I hope you find this information helpful to you moving forward. :-)

May 10, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have a 3 ton Rheem heat pump that calls for about 225# pressure on the high side at about 40 degrees outside with tstat set at 70 degrees indoor.... I am confused as to why both sides of the manifold...


Where are you connecting the gauges? It sounds like you have both gages on the high pressure side. You can't hook the suction gauge to the Big line on a heatpump because that is high pressure in the heating mode. There should be another tap that says low side or low pressure, that's where you hook the suction gauge. As for adding more refrigerant, I wouldn't do that until I measure the subcooling.
If you charge it in heating unless you weigh it in you want about 10° to 15° subcooling. Then this summer you need to check the subcooling at about 95° outdoor ambient then charge it to about 10° to 15° subcooling in the cooling mode and that should be the correct charge.

Feb 15, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

13 degree Delta T


I assume r-22 refrigerant by the pressure... you have a saturate temperature of approximately 41 degree and 71 degrees at the service port this equates to a 30 degree superheat. a condenser saturation temperature of 105 degrees and since the liquid line temp at the service valve is not given only the enterin indoor coil on the liquid line a 96 degree temperature this would equate to a subcooling temperatureof about nine degrees. You have too high of a superheat reading. verify that the bulb for the txv is correctly positioned and insulated. if it is then you need to remove the bulb from the suction line, hold it in your hand to warm it up and see if the superheat changes. you could also have issues with your ductwork. If the supply temperture is around 50-55 degrees then the unit is doing all it can.. Check the txv and the ductwork as the subcooling indicates that the condenser side is doing it's job, but the superheat readings indicate that you are starving the evaporator..

Jul 28, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

How to use it


Subcooling - The difference between the temperature of the Small copper line (Liquid Line) and the high-side (red) gauge temp on your manifold

Superheat - The difference between the temp. of the Suction line (Big copper) and the low side gauge (blue) temp

Apr 26, 2009 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

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