Question about Panasonic NV-GS55 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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Not recording on tape

I am using the video cam for recording from external source i.e. from the receiver that receive wireless video signals from my remote plane. The problem is when I tried to record it always record on the SD card in MPEG4 format. The compression does not produce good picture. How do I record to the tape instead of the card. Please help.

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  • Anonymous Mar 27, 2014

    I've been trying to set up the TV to the internet via a wireless router at my computer, but when I try, it says that something has to be connected on the TV in order to receive the wireless signal; could you help? Kevin

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Take out SD card from camera and try torecord.

Posted on Jul 24, 2008

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1 Answer

How to use loop in and loop out functions


What devices are we discussing?

The standard Tape Loop on any receiver is for analog 2-channel material only.

You connect in an external device (tape, eq, any old processor that has an IN and an OUT). Then you select that function via front panel control. It sends whatever source you had selected OUT to the Tape devicwe/processor, whatever, for manipulation and the device's own internal electronics make that recorded or manipulated signal available on its OUTput for MONITORING.

Modern AV receivers will not tolerate a Tape Monitor being activated while processing a digital source, so you will get nothing out, nothing processed and nothing heard back. The reason for that is that any signal it processes is automatically digitized for possible use of Sound Fields and other DSP magic. To export and import a digital source would require facilities to convert Digital to Analog (for external processing) to Digital. Don't hold your breath.

Even if it could do multiple conversions, any multichannel encoding would get lost.

On the bright side, external processors can be used for any stero analog source and once it copmes back to the AVR you can apply DSP to it. One conversion, no loss of information.

Apr 19, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Have a technics SHGE70 and trying to hook it up to a sony STR-K660P. the receiver has a red and white rcs for dvd audio in and red and whitre video audio in. thats all the rca outlets it has. i unhooked...


I see an EQ and a Receiver with NO Tape Loops or external audio sources mentioned.

Are you implying this used to be hooked up and working? Or are you asking how to integrate the EQ NOW after a move?

Normally the receiver would have a defeatable external loop for Tape recording. THAT is where the EQ or any other processor would go.

The following is mostly boilerplate for receivers WITH a tape loop. You need to understand what will and will not work even if you could attach the EQ.

--- Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast. --


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_TaoBB_L8lt0/TDi__0VSpoI/AAAAAAAAACc/uS9ODAazZi0/s1600/HPIM0718.JPG



If you wanted to Equalize a single external analog source you would have to connect the EQ Line output to either of the two analog inputs ("DVD" or "Video" in your case) and connect your external source to the Playback jacks on the EQ.


Mar 15, 2011 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

I was wonder if yu could tell me how to hook up my equilizer to my stero


Outs to ins. Got any model numbers in mind? "Stero" literally or multichannel?

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Mar 09, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Can connect kenwood equalizer ke-205 to a surround sound receiver


Yes BUT...

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 05, 2011 | Kenwood VR-507 Receiver

1 Answer

How to connect my eq to my harman kardon recevier model avr-247


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Any of the following audio connections on the HK will work: Tape, Vid1 or Vid 2.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 04, 2011 | Harman Kardon Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How to install


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 03, 2011 | Teac EQA-120 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Can i loop my EQ through the PRE-OUT and MULTI-IN of my RX-V661?


No. When you select multi-in you bypass everything in the receiver so you would have no program source exiting the receiver to the EQ.

Use it in the standard MD/CD-R slot.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Rec-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Play-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Jan 26, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

No sound unless VIDEO signal is plugged into receiver


Connect the DVD player audio with digital coax into the digital audio connection as you described and the DVD video directly to the TV. Now switch the input mode on the receiver to DVD. Then switch the video output mode on the TV to correspond to the input you plugged into. Any source in 5.1 dolby digital or dts should now work properly and have picture too.

May 07, 2009 | Yamaha HTR-6130 Receiver

1 Answer

HK AVR35 Receiver - Dolby Digital not displaying or working


If the display is showing as optical/PCM, then the input signal is in 2 Ch Stereo.

Try to change the signal from the source i.e. the DVD player, On the remote, go to audio and press repatedly , the audio would change from audio1, audio 2 .... and so on, depending upon how may have been recorded on the DVD. If the DVD is recorded in Dolby Digital, it may show the audio as Dolby Digital 5.1 on you monitor. Once this setting has been done, your Receiver should automatically detect it and show as Optical/Dolby digital.

Please let me know if you you solve your problem.

Mar 12, 2009 | Harman Kardon AVR 35 Receiver

1 Answer

My bose pmcii lcd remote control does not receive a signal from a bose lifestyle 48 receiver. I made all the connections for the wireless system whose receiver is getting a stron signal from the...


Have you tried using the remote antenna supplied with the Bose system? This connects to the "Remote antenna" socket on the rear of the media centre and is made up of 2 parts: a shielded section (black in colour) that runs past any sources of interference - mains or signal cables, other electronics products - and the unshielded antenna (clear plastic covered copper wire) that must be fully extended vertically to act as an aerial. Position this away from sources of interference and as close to the second room as possible (Bose do a longer version, free of charge in some countries....)
The remotes only have a range of up to 20metres - this will drop the more walls it passes through and the thicker the walls. Any interference can affect this - radio transmitting equipment (WiFi, video sender, but especially products transmitting on the same frequency - 27MHz or 40MHz, e.g wirless thermostats or alarm systems....) or products with poorly shielded transformers. Experiment with swtiching off other electical equipment (including lights if they have a transformer - e.g. halogen spot lamps). If you identify a source, can you move it away.....?

Oct 21, 2007 | Bose PMCII 035323 LCD Remote Control

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