Question about 2wire HomePortal 1000HW DSL Modem and Network Router -1000-400210-000_LN_R (1000400210000LNR)

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Lightning strike Our computer that was the secondary one can't connect to the internet without causing the phoneline to be busy when it never has done that before. The computer sparked one night during a storm and the phone tech said it was the phone jack so we moved the computer to another room, bit it still doed the samething. Is it the phone jacks or the usb port that is doing it?

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  • emagn Jul 24, 2008

    Thanks, we just tried that,it still does it. Anymore ideas on why it is tying up the phone lines?

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It is the computer's internal modem. Replace the modem and the problem will be solved.

Thanks and please take a moment to rate as FixYa. Thank you.

Posted on Jul 23, 2008

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Im trying to set up my router,i have been using it before but my cpu has been damaged by lightning,sinv\ce then i cant use my router. i followed instructions on how to re configure it,my laptop and pc...


sometimes this router are afected by the lightnings, verify that the internet connection is working well by plugin the internet(ethernet) cable directly to your computer, if it gets connected to the internet we are sure the probleme is isolated to the router.
The easiest way to check if the problem is the router WAN(internet) port would be connecting a known good router just for few minutes

Aug 29, 2011 | Linksys Wireless-G WRT54G Router

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What is theam.if we apply theam the wole appreance will change or only on desktop


How Can One Cable Modem Work With Two Wireless Routers? By Terry Stockdale Leave a Comment In How to Fry a Wireless Router or Two, I wrote about my brother's experience frying a pair of wireless modems in a lightning storm. Last week, I talked about what had happened, why it happened, and what he could do to prevent the problem in the future (this was the third set of routers, plus he lost a computer motherboard in that storm).
This week, we'll look at his network layout, and why he could not get the network to set up properly.
To summarize the situation, he has an office an a shop, with computers on his network in both locations. Some connect via wired connections (Ethernet), while others use wireless connections. His Internet cable comes into the office first.
In the past, he first used Linksys wireless routers. Then DLinks. This time, he chose Belkin wireless routers.
The incoming cable (standard cable-company RG6 coaxial cable) connects to the cable modem.
Then, the cable modem connects to the WAN (wide area network "Internet") connection on the router.
The local wired ports on the router provide connections for two wired computers. Notebooks connect via wireless connections. Finally, one wired connection on the router is used to connect an Ethernet cable that runs 250 feed to the office from the shop.
That cable was the lightning problem, as it runs outside in a conduit just a little bit underground. Effectively, he's got a 250 foot antenna looking for the electromagnetic pulse from a lightning strike. Most of us don't worry about that because our equipment is so well grounded in the house, plus the Ethernet cables we use are much shorter lines. Even if we have underground cable company lines running from their switch boxes to our houses, those lines are usually only exposed about 40 to 50 feet before they enter the dwellings.
Back to the situation. When he hooked up his replacement routers, the router at the shop immediately worked. Not so, on the router in the office. The Ethernet light and the Activity light just poounded away, blinking and blinking rapidly. But, nothing connecting to the router could get to the Internet.
If they connected a computer directly to the Ethernet cable in the office, without running it into the router first, it worked just fine. But, with the router in place, it didn't work.
The problem was the way he connected the two routers. The problem is that there is no Out Of The Box connection that will work reliably. At least one thing, usually two, has/have to be tweaked one way or another.
As one might guess, the easiest way to connect would be to connect one router's WAN connector to the cable modem, using Ethernet cable, and then use Ethernet cable to connect one of the Local Area Network (LAN) connectors on that router ot the WAN router on the other computer.
There is a problem with this setup, but it's easily solved. First, if you're using identical wireless routers, as he was, the wireless routers are both trying to use the same IP Address range and subnet mask for their local area networks.
That works fine for the first router, which is connected to cable modem. On the cable modem side, it gets an IP address on the Internet Service Provider's network - often an actual Internet address and not just a private network address. On the local area network, it assigns the IP address range specified in its setup menu. This often varies by manufacturer. In the case of Linksys, this is 192.168.1.x. In the case of the Belkin routers he bought, it was 192.168.2.x.
The problem occurs at the second router. On it's WAN side, it sees a 192.168.2.x network - but it's default setting tells it to give 192.168.2.x addresses on it's local area network side, too. In other words - it's confused. It doesn't know where to find the Internet because both networks are assigned the same addresses.
The solution was to disconnect the second router's WAN/Internet cable, connect to it via a wired computer, and tell the second router to use a different IP address range. We chose 192.168.3.x.
We hooked up the Ethernet cable to the Internet/WAN side of the router again. The router started working fine, normal light blinks for activity, no more confusion. The computers could get to the Internet just fine.
Problem solved.
That solved the Internet connection problem. However, no computers in the office would be able to share files or printers with the shop, nor would computers in the shop be able to share with the office. That was both acceptable and intended, in this case.
It could be done; however, that would require a different configuration on the routers and connections.

Jan 05, 2011 | Routers

1 Answer

Ive recently bought a new xbox 360 console and now i want to play online but i need toknow exactly what i need as in what broadband, how many mb, and if i need a phoneline?


An xbox will work ok with any internet connection.
You can use an ADSL connection through your phoneline, or a cable internet connection.
I would aim for at least 2 Mbit connection, most companies are offering up to 20 Mbit, so you should not have a problem.
There are plenty of guides to show you how to set up your xbox. Just google Xbox internet setup

Oct 17, 2010 | Routers

1 Answer

Cant get into 192.168.1.1 to fix problem


Do you have cable or DSL internet service? On a DSL setup the router is at 192.168.2.1 . At the run command, ipconfig/all will give all the current settings of your network connection. The line with default gateway is your router address.

Check the status lights on your router and modem as well as the network connection on your computer. You may want to try connecting to the modem itself with a wired connection and then reconnect the router and see if you can connect with a wired connection from the computer to the router.

If your network works normally with a wired connection, use the device manager to check your wireless connection. Also go through the router setup to check that no settings have been changed.

If you have missing lights on either the modem or the router, check the cables (replace them if you can) and transformers. A call for service from your ISP may be needed if the modem isn't connecting. (At least once, my DSL network went down after a lightning strike damaged the signal filter where the DSL split from the phone line.)

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells
(I have an older router that does not give a local area connection if it loses the WAN from the modem.)

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2 Answers

Hi there!! do you think my majickjack will work with att3G connect card mercury on my laptop?


from what I understand yes, it uses whatever internet path you are on with the computer.

Jul 08, 2009 | 2wire 1800HG Router (RG1800HG00)

1 Answer

Router connection


Hiya, either the seetings on the router fiewall have changed, or the shock has damaged the circuit board somehow, the speed that the computer says its connected to is whats called LOCAL only, meaning you are connected at that speed to the router only, circuit boards do funny things when shocked, have you tried another router? Id put my money on the board being fried.

Apr 08, 2008 | MSI Wireless-G RG54G3 Router

1 Answer

Rg54g3 router problem


Lightning seems to have zapped the Ethernet port on the Modem side, the WAN port, this is quite common with telephone and cable line surges. 
Consider your router smoked.

Apr 07, 2008 | MSI Wireless-G RG54G3 Router

1 Answer

Reg internet download speed


you aren't going to get the best performance of your highspeed always. Stuff like this varies in wiring both outside and inside your home, try getting a data telephone cord (usually gray and thicker that a regular phoneline or a good phoneline, the length of your ethernet cable, the distance between your company's service providing plant and your house. Try getting a faster connecton speed.

Mar 02, 2008 | 2wire 2700HG-B Router (2700HGB)

1 Answer

Maximum Capacity of the Home Phoneline Network


The 100 series (1Mbit) supports up to 25 computers. The 200 series (10Mbit) supports up to 30 computers.

Feb 16, 2006 | Linksys HomeLink Phoneline (HPRO200)...

1 Answer

Daisy-Chaining a HomeLink Phoneline Network


With a HomeLink card installed in your PC, connect your PC to a phone jack using a standard phone cable. Using another standard phone cable, connect the card's other phone cable port to connect to your second PC. Continue to connect up to twenty-five PCs in this way on one chain. If you want to use your telephone, modem, or fax machine, add a two-way splitter to your wall?s phone jack or connect the device to the empty phone jack in the last card at the end of your daisy chain. Daisy-chaining your HomeLink PCs and peripherals can create a simple network that acts in the same way an Ethernet network acts on your PC's desktop. In a HomeLink network, data passes into one side of a port, and continues out from the port?s other side. You can string up to 25 PCs on a single HomeLink network, provided that the entire length of cable does not exceed 150 meters (500 feet). HomeLink networks can send data through existing telephone lines without disrupting your telephone service. If you have PCs on two different floors of your house, plug one of the downstairs PCs into the phone jack in the wall, and you're able to network your PCs upstairs without running excessive amounts of extra cable.

Feb 16, 2006 | Linksys HomeLink Phoneline (HPRO200)...

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