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Oil damped cueing riser on 1975 Sanyo full automatic turntable will not rise. Must manually raise and lower tonearm and then catch it before it reaches the end of the album, or the return mechanism will cause the arm to slide across the face. Otherwise, the machine works perfectly. As a matter of fact the only thing that's ever been done was a belt replacement about 15 yrs. ago. Thanks, John

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5 Suggested Answers

  • 518 Answers

SOURCE: Cueing Problems on Technics SL-1300MK2

Usually the damping fluid is to let the tone arm lower slowly, lifting is usually a mechanical link. Read THIS.

Hope that helps...

Geno

Posted on Apr 01, 2008

MJS_1
  • 150 Answers

SOURCE: Problem with autoreturn of tonearm

This very much depends on the type (and vintage) of the
turntable.

Very old turntables used a system of mechanical CAMs,
slaved to the main plater. Once engaged (usually through
a hinged/retracted gear-tooth), the platter would spin the cam,
which in turn would lift the tone arm, move it back home,
shut off the power and disengage itself after one complete
revolution.

This system could be mechanically triggered with the power off,
just by swinging the tone arm towards the center, and spinning
the platter manually by hand. To fix it you had to make internal
mechanical adjustments, or replace worn out levers, wheels,
bearings, springs, etc...

A more modern turntable will use electrical sensors,
such as a micro-switch under the tonearm gimbals,
which is triggered as the tonearm swings towards the center.
A second switch is coupled to the stop/ return button.

Once the mech. is triggered, it can derive its power from the
plater (as before) or use a separate servo motor to lift
and return the tone-arm. The viscously damped cueing
mechanism can also be involved in lifting the arm during
the return cycle.

At the hi-tech extreme, a microprocessor can control the
whole works through the use of selenoids and stepping
motors with optical or magnetic sensors to trigger it,
position it and disengage it.

0) Note:
During all testing, remove the record and cover the
stylus with its protective gate to prevent damage.

If the stylus slides out of the cartridge, like it did on the
Shure cartridges, remove the stylus gently and put it in
a safe place to avoid damaging it. You do NOT want to
ever drop the stylus on the spinning rubber platter surface.

But leave the main head and cartridge in place for normal
tone-arm balance.

Turn off your amplifier, or turn down the volume to zero, to
prevent damage to your ears and the speakers if the needle
does fall when it shouldn't

1) Assuming that this is a fairly modern turntable, with
a gimbal mounted tone arm (the large double hung ring
bearing at the back for swinging both ways) and a
counter weight for setting the stylus pressure...

and possibly an anti-skating adjustment as well...

It is fair to assume that the cuing lever is what lifts
the arm vertically, regardless of the swing return mechanics.

2) The premature stylus drop (during return) is therefore
caused either by a cuing defect, or by lift timing,
either mechanical or electronic.

The stylus weigh setting is NOT an issue here, that
is determined by the stylus and cartridge specifications,
and must be set correctly to prevent record and stylus
damage.

Note that both too much and to little weight is BAD.
Too much weigh is obvious, but too little will cause
mis-tracking, distortion and premature record wear.

Similarly, and incorrect tracking pitch or yaw will also
cause early damage, as will incorrect anti-skating for
a particular stylus pressure.

3) First of all, test the cuing lever at several different tone-
arm angles, to see if it stays up, or droops down with time.

If there is a problem, check the springs, viscous damping..

Take the ****** apart from below, and see what gives.
Is it mechanical, hydraulic, or electronic ?

4) If it is electronic, you have a control/ timing problem,
which requires a service manual and a qualified electronic
tech to fix it.

You should be able to check any sensors, switches
or motor yourself, though.

5) If the cuing lift system is mechanical, check the levers
and cams:
What is driving it ?
Is it broken ?
Is worn out ?
Is it out of adjustment ?
Is it slipping ?
Is it stuck ?
Is one of the springs all stretched or missing ?

6) If the lift is hydraulic or pneumatic, check for leaks.

7) If the manual lift seems to work, but the automatic return
drops it...

why?
what is controlling it ?
how is it linked it to the arm return mech ?
Is there a coordination/timing problem ?

Have fun.
Please rate my answers.

Martin.

Posted on Jul 01, 2008

  • 104 Answers

SOURCE: Turntable tonearm returns but starts playing record over again.

http://www.vinylengine.com/library/pioneer/pl-570.shtml
on page 8 of the above service manual for your model it shows 4 electrical switches that tell the computer what 'state' the mechanism is in at any given time. Either one or more of the switches are intermittant or the mechanism has dried up grease that is slowing down the operation and basically gumming up the works. the old grease would have to be removed and replaced when it is causing binding. The switch just to the right of where is says "microswitch ksf-023" is an 'open air' type and so would be the most likely suspect. it simply needs to be cleaned with a super fine file designed only for cleaning switch contacts. THIS SERVICE SHOULD ONLY BE PERFORMED BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL ONLY!!!!!

Posted on Feb 11, 2009

  • 12 Answers

SOURCE: Technics 1210 tonearm skates when cueing vinyl backwards

I've seen this on technics turntables before. Try tightening the screw on the arm.

Posted on May 21, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: tonearm lifter in UP position - how to fix

I have also had this problem with the same model turntable. I opened mine up and the problem seems to have been that the grease on the arm lift and cueing lever was gumming up the linkage between the two. (I suspect that my turntable hadn't been used in some time.) I managed to free up the parts by manually working the the arm lift (pressing it down) several times. I'm not sure that I needed to open up the chasis for this fix but it did help me to see what was going on. Good luck with yours.

Tim Orange

Posted on Jul 19, 2009

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Adding oil to tone arm - sherwood st903


There is no oil to ever be added to any tonearm. If you're talking about the fluid used to raise or lower the tonearm, that is known as damping fluid, which takes experience to apply correctly, even if you can find the fluid at all. It's obviously not used often anymore, and it's a very specific type and weight. If you need further assistance, or would like to inquire about repairing your unit, please visit my website at audioserviceclinic.com. Thank you.

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The cuing is a Mechanical/Hydraulic system. Naturally, it can be either one issue or another. The tonearm is damped, so that the cartridge doesn't plummet down onto the record causing damage when you cue the tonearm down. This damping fluid can seize up, causing no cuing. If you require more assistance, or would like to inquire about a repair, please visit my website at audioserviceclinic.com. Thank you.

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I have a Crosley CR49 turntable and the tonearm seems to be misaligned. I lift the cue lever and place the tonearm where I want it to land on the record, but when I lower the cue lever the tonearm moves...


that situation is possible that it is bent a little. make sure your table is level when using it and check the weight in the back to see if its too far out leaving the tone are to bounce of drift easily. you can manually put the needle down in the meantime.

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Turntable stops before the end of a 45. Works fine for Albums. I found 1 solution but that says to take the player apart.


Just had this occur to me and after a couple seconds figured it out. Tonearm returns once it hits a certain height on the tonearm guide (the bit that goes up and down when you raise or lower the tonearm cue lever.) If you manually hold down the guide, the tonearm will continue to play the 7" until the end. You don't have to push down hard, just a nice gentle [pressure while the record plays should do it. It solved the problem for me.

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How do you adjust the tone arm on a Denon DP-47F turntable? Thanks Cosmicharlie


Basically, like almost any other turntable.

Look up the recommended tracking force for your cartridge/stylus.

Unplug the power to the turntable.
Using the tonearm elevation control, raise the tonearm.
Manually move the tonearm in toward the platter.
Manually rotate the platter ClockWise a few turns to disengage any cueing mechanisms.
Set the Tracking and Anti-skating controls to 0.
Disengage the tonearm elevation control. The tonearm will either float or drop. This is why we have no power, just in case it hits the platter.
Adjust the counterweight until the tonearm floats exactly horizontal. Use the flat portion of the tonarm rest as a gauge.
Return the tonearm to its rest.
Dial in the prescribed tracking force and anti-skating. Play records.


Register with http://www.vinylengine.com/ and find the manual here...

http://www.vinylengine.com/library/denon/dp-47f.shtml

Basically, like almost any other turntable.

Look up the recommended tracking force for your cartridge/stylus.
Unplug the power to the turntable.
Using the tonearm elevation control, raise the tonearm.
Manually move the tonearm in toward the platter.
Manually rotate the platter ClockWise a few turns to disengage any cueing mechanisms.
Set the Tracking and Anti-skating controls to 0.
Disengage the tonearm elevation control. The tonearm will either float or drop. This is why we have no power, just in case it hits the platter.
Adjust the counterweight until the tonearm floats exactly horizontal. Use the flat portion of the tonarm rest as a gauge.
Return the tonearm to its rest.
Dial in the prescribed tracking force and anti-skating. Play records.

Apr 14, 2011 | Denon DP-47F Turntable

1 Answer

I have an older QL-45 turntable that needs tone arm adjustment- I don`t know how to set the weight so it doesn`t lower down to album so hard or heavily


I can't find the specific turntable. Who makes it?

This should work with some modifications for your specific controls...

Make a note of the tracking force setting.


Make sure the turntable is level.


Unplug the power to the turntable.

Using the tonearm elevation control, raise the tonearm.

Manually move the tonearm in toward the platter.

Manually rotate the platter ClockWise a few turns to disengage any cueing mechanisms.

Set the Stylus Pressure/Tracking setting to 0.

Disengage the tonearm elevation control. The tonearm will either float or drop. This is why we have no power, just in case it hits the platter.

Adjust the counterweight until the tonearm floats exactly horizontal. Use the flat portion of the tonarm rest as a gauge.

Return the tonearm to its rest.

Dial in the prescribed tracking force on the Stylus Pressure/Tracking control. Play records.

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2 Answers

I have a Pioneer PL-740 turntable that works extremely well, except there is zero damping when either lifting or dropping (and I mean dropping) the needle. I know there is generally a hydraulic oil that...


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Some turntables have a lifter arm that is dampened, but if your player doesn't have such a mechanism, or if it has one and you choose to manually manipulate the needle without it's usage, there is no dampening.
The fix unfortunately is to buy a turntable with a dampened lifter arm, and to use the arm when lifting and lowering the needle.

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1 Answer

45 and 33 sound slow


Here's a procedure for setting the tonearm...

Look up the recommended tracking force for your cartridge/stylus.

Unplug the power to the turntable and place it on a perfectly level surface.

Set the Tracking Force and AntiSkating to 0.
Using the tonearm elevation control, raise the tonearm.
Manually move the tonearm in toward the platter.
Manually rotate the platter Clockwise a few turns to disengage any cueing mechanisms.
Disengage the tonearm elevation control. The tonearm will either float or drop. This is why we have no power, just in case it hits the platter.
Adjust the counterweight until the tonearm floats exactly horizontal. Use the flat portion of the tonarm rest as a gauge.
Return the tonearm to its rest.
If you don't have a Stylus Tracking Force Gauge. Dial in the prescribed tracking force and a corresponding anti-skate reading. Play records.

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Try to grab the belt with something soft without sharp edges - say, a loop of yarn or ribbon. Rotate the opening in the platter over to the drive pulley (generally about the 7-8 o'clock position when viewed from the front) and using the ribbon gently stretch the belt over it. If it catches remove the ribbon and manually rotate the platter clockwise about 5-10 turns to seat it and reset any cueing mechanisms. If it's still on and tensioned replace the plate and go to the balancing act.

Look up the recommended tracking force for your cartridge/stylus.

Unplug the power to the turntable and place it on a perfectly level surface.
Using the tonearm elevation control, raise the tonearm.
Manually move the tonearm in toward the platter.
Manually rotate the platter ClockWise a few turns to disengage any cueing mechanisms.
Set the Tracking Force to 0.
Disengage the tonearm elevation control. The tonearm will either float or drop. This is why we have no power, just in case it hits the platter.
Adjust the counterweight until the tonearm floats exactly horizontal. Use the flat portion of the tonarm rest as a gauge.
Return the tonearm to its rest.
Dial in the prescribed tracking force and a corresponding anti-skate reading. Play records.

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3 Answers

Tonearm lifter in UP position - how to fix


I have also had this problem with the same model turntable. I opened mine up and the problem seems to have been that the grease on the arm lift and cueing lever was gumming up the linkage between the two. (I suspect that my turntable hadn't been used in some time.) I managed to free up the parts by manually working the the arm lift (pressing it down) several times. I'm not sure that I needed to open up the chasis for this fix but it did help me to see what was going on. Good luck with yours.

Tim Orange

Mar 20, 2009 | Technics SL-BD20D Turntable

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