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What is vrv sytems energy saving advantages

Pls let me know how vrv system work and basic energy saving

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  • kometo123
    kometo123 Feb 24, 2014

    what is code a3 of vrv

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Pumpdown vrv


You must locate the pipes on the outdoor unit and remove the caps. With the unit in cooling mode and operating shut the liquid line valve. (This is the smaller of the 2 pipes) allow unit to continue running for a few minutes then close the suction line valve ( the larger pipe) Turn unit off, the unit should now be pumped down ie all the gas is now stored in the outdoor unit. You should now be able to disconnect the pipe work from the outdoor unit. If the pipe work is to be disconnected and reconnected you must use a vacuum pump to remove any air before opening the valves otherwise you will have trouble with the unit

Sep 07, 2014 | Heating & Cooling

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Tax Incentives for Heating and Air Conditioning


The passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, consumers are able upgrade to more energy-efficient heating and air conditioning equipment. They can start saving on energy bills right away, and you may also save on your taxes next year. For your home, these benefits can include lowering home energy bills, increasing your indoor comfort, and reducing air pollution. These programs are helping savvy consumers’ lower energy bills in their home. The energy-efficient products that are eligible for the new federal tax credits can lower the amount of federal income taxes that many taxpayers must pay Uncle Sam.

There are some new potentially lucrative tax incentives for energy-efficient and renewable-energy home improvements. These may offer some consolation to many homeowners who feel they are getting forgotten with the government's various economic stimulus efforts.

There is a $1,500 energy-efficient credit, which currently will last only last two years, meaning consumers will have to find a way to spend this money during this economic downturn. Homeowners now have a new opportunity to lower their energy costs and save on their 2009 federal income taxes by making specific energy efficiency upgrades to their homes.

There is also a new tax credit that will be effective 2009 through 2016 for 30 percent of the cost of a qualified geothermal heat pump. This can be for up to $2,000. These caps do not apply to certain alternative energy systems like geothermal heat pumps, solar water heaters, wind power, or photovoltaic systems. The benefits for installing some pricier solar technology, small wind-energy systems or geothermal-well systems can include a tax credit of 30% for qualifying expenditures with no upper limit through 2016. In order for you to claim your credit, the energy efficient improvements you must use qualifying Energy Star rated products and they must be started up sometime between from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010.

By doing your research and talking with your heating and air conditioning professional you may be able to save a substantial amount of money and get some great home improvements at the same time.

on Dec 26, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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Air Conditioner SEER Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio


Energy consumption for home air conditioning accounts for almost 5% of all the electricity produced in the USA. Energy Policy Act mandates minimum energy efficiency standards for commercial buildings, using research and standards developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers. Energy Star qualified central air conditioners have a higher seasonal efficiency rating (SEER) than standard models, which makes them about 14% more efficient than standard models. Energy efficiency specialists with certified training on retrofits and energy savings on both residential and light commercial units may enable you to save up to 50 percent on your air conditioning bills with the use of a high efficiency energy system. Substantial energy savings can be obtained from more efficient systems.

SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) is related to the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER), which is the ratio of output cooling in Btu/Hr and the input power in watts W at a given operating point and also to the coefficient of performance (COP) commonly used in thermodynamics. SEER rating more accurately reflects overall system efficiency on a seasonal basis and EER reflects the system’s energy efficiency at peak day operations.

The SEER rating is the Btu of cooling output during a typical cooling-season divided by the total electric energy input in watt-hours during the same period. SEER is related to the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER), which is the ratio of output cooling in Btu/Hr and the input power in watts W at a given operating point and also to the coefficient of performance (COP) commonly used in thermodynamics. SEER rating more accurately reflects overall system efficiency on a seasonal basis and EER reflects the system’s energy efficiency at peak day operations. The higher the SEER number, the greater the efficiency of your unit. Therefore you will realize greater energy savings. The higher efficiency your product, the lower your long-term energy costs will be. Both central AC and air source heat pumps are rated according to seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER).

Before you consider upgrading your cooling equipment, the cheapest way to save money and energy from cooling is to reduce the need for mechanical air conditioning in the first place. Ask your contractor about a variable speed air handler, which will improve comfort and efficiency and allow continuous air filtering at minimum energy cost. Also, because ducts are often responsible for a lot of wasted energy, make sure you hire a contractor who knows about high-efficiency installations. If your central air conditioning unit is more than 12 years old, replacing it with an Energy Star qualified model could cut your cooling costs by 30 percent.


on Dec 14, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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Window ac unit shuts off when outside temp is lower then inside temp, doesn't help to turn down ' it still will turn off' its insulated all around very good and its new


It might have a "Green Feature", for lack of a better word. Does the unit still run the fan at all?

If the fan still runs without the compressor, then it is cooling in what they call economizer mode, basically uses the outside air to cool and save on energy.

That is my educated guess.

If you have a user manual for it, look to see if there is a energy saving feature to it.

Aug 19, 2013 | Heating & Cooling

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Air Conditioning Programmable Thermostats - Great for Heating and Cooling


Programmable thermostats contribute to overall system performance, maximizing energy savings while providing complete comfort control. They also allow flexibility to homeowners because they can be programmed to match their lifestyle. Programmable thermostats save energy by turning down the cooling and heating system at night or at times when your home is typically unoccupied.


Did you know that properly using a programmable thermostat in your home is one of the easiest ways you can save energy, money. Homeowners can save about $180 a year by properly setting their programmable thermostats and maintaining those settings. They can achieve significant energy and money savings that are possible through the proper use of your programmable thermostat. Programmable thermostats do two things:
(1) Compare the thermometer reading of a room's temperature to the "ideal" thermostat temperature you select.

(2) Give start-and-stop commands to the heating or cooling system in order to achieve an indoor temperature that is as close to your "ideal" thermostat setting as possible.


Your savings will largely depend on the length of your energy saving program periods and the temperatures set. For example, an energy saving period of 10 hours with the temperature set back 10° will save more than a 5 hour energy saving period with the temperature set back 5°. By maintaining the highest or lowest required temperatures for four or five hours a day instead of 24 hours, a programmable thermostat can pay for itself in energy saved within four years.

A programmable thermostat will keep you and your home comfortable while you are there to enjoy it, and will change the set point at programmed times to an energy savings level when you are not home. The precise temperature control of a programmable, energy-saving thermostat saves wear and tear on high-efficiency heating and cooling equipment by properly cycling the equipment. A programmable thermostat will keep you and your home comfortable while you are there to enjoy it, and will change the set point at programmed times to an energy savings level when you are not home.


Controlling your heating more effectively could save you up to 17% on your heating costs. In fact, during the winter you can save about 3 percent of your heating costs for every degree you lower your thermostat. Begin lowering your heating bill immediately with the pre-programmed 7-day schedule, or modify the programming to suit your lifestyle. By delivering the heating or cooling when you need it, and optimizing temperature for activity, sleep and times you are away you can maximize your comfort level and save energy.

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on Dec 06, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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I have a 23 year old Goodman 4 ton HVAC system that has done well but is needing more repairs more frequently. I am looking to replace the unit but anything I install will be placed on credit which is not...


A 23 year old unit will be a major energy hog.You will see a massive improvement even with a less efficient unit,but go with the energy efficiency.The price of fuel is going to keep going up,and you will be using the furnace for many years.I'm in Ohio,and we get by just fine on electric for the very rare occasion the temperature drops below the level where the heat pump cant keep up.If this really worries you,you can put a couple space heaters back for emergency.Of course your talking about a gas unit,or a dual fuel unit.The dual fuel would be your best bet of course for ultimate fuel efficiency,but they can be pricey for the ones with all the bells,and whistles.Some will even use the fuel that is less expensive at any given time throughout the day.For example in some circumstances electricity is more expensive during the day then at night.Ultimately you have to figure out how much energy you use on average to heat your house.If you know the efficiency of the unit you have now you can estimate the actual output energy that is actually needed to heat/cool your house.Which would be the effective output of the old unit.Figure out how much less energy input you will need with a more efficient unit to get the same average output as the old unit.Subtract the energy usage for the new unit from the average energy use from the last winter.This will be your approximate energy savings.This should give you some Idea of the energy savings.

Jun 24, 2009 | Ruud UBHC Air Conditioner

1 Answer

We have installed a rinnai water heater in the basement. Since it takes a little time before the hot water arrives in the kitchen or upstairs in the shower, we are wasting qite a bit of potable water every...


The only way to reduce water waste would be to have a plumber install smaller pipes coming from the water heater to each individual point of use. The normal way of plumbing a house uses a large pipe that has smaller pipes that go to each sink, tub, shower, etc. The larger the pipe, the more water is in it and the longer it will take to get hot water to where it is going. An electric tank won't save you from wasting any water unless you have a separate hot water circulation system installed. This would keep the hot water drawn out to the far ends of the plumbing system and allow the hot water to reach it's destination alot sooner. However, keeping a tank full of water hot is not economical and a circulation system basically turns your pipes into a radiator causing you to waste electricity. I know it may seem that you are wasting alot of water waiting for the hot water to get there, but in the long run you and the environment are coming out ahead due to the saved energy and efficiency of the Rinnai unit. Also just in case you were thinking of it, a circulating system is not compatible with a Rinnai water heater.

Jun 19, 2008 | Rinnai Heating & Cooling

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