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Bernina 145 Bobbin winding problem

My Bernina won't properly wind a bobbin.  The slightest bit of thread tension (from the spool to the bobbin) causes the bobbin winding post to stop spinning.
Grrrrrrr! --  aAny self fix or self adjustment suggestions?  Really hate to take it to a tech because frequently when I do the machine comes back with some new problem.  I'm in San Francisco and there just don't seem to be any good machine techs near here these days.

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If the winder is working without thread as it should you can rule out an electronic and motor issue. At this point it won't hurt to remove the two screws on top and lift your top cover off. Take a close look at your winder and see if there is any thread or anything wound around or blocking it. There are one or two screws that will adjust the eveness of your bobbinwinding but I don't think this is part of the problem (just a slight turn for that until the bobbin winds evenly). There is a spring beneith the winder that may have popped loose, check that but if the little arm snaps back and forth thats ok. The spring should be in the second tooth of the gear notches.
I hope this helps.

Posted on Jul 31, 2008

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Winding bobbin on old elna lotus


I can help you with this, the Elna Lotus has a pretty simple bobbin winding system, the bobbin winder is top right of the machine, drop bobbin with holes to the top onto the spindle. Now Lotus have a dial on the right side which switches between bobbin winding, stitching and locked for transport, turn it to Bobbin symbol. Take the thread from the spool pin at the back across to the metal eyelet at top front (it sits inside the accessory tray when transporting so you may need to pop open the tray lid and flip this eyelet out)
24421001-h4211ohbpts0t3j0sbmab0vm-2-0.jpg Now take thread across and through a hole on top of the bobbin and holding the tail, put your foot onto the foot control to get a couple of winds onto the bobbin to hold the thread. Now place your finger or the handle of a pair of scissors onto the top of the thread spool to apply tension so that the thread winds evenly and slowly wind the bobbin until about 3/4 full, making sure it winds evenly. Tension onto the spool is the key here, Lotus doesn't have a tension device to control the thread tension as it winds so you need to do this, critical to getting a good stitch out of these lovely machines.

Hope this helps you out.

May 14, 2014 | Elna Sewing Machines

Tip

Winding a bobbin correctly


The heart of sewing is producing a well tensioned seam and achieving this with any sewing machine will be difficult if you don't wind a bobbin smoothly and with even tension onto the thread. If you look at your bobbin and the thread on it looks all lumpy and uneven, then this tip is for you.

Each time you wind a bobbin, whatever sewing machine it is on, it is really important to keep even tension on the thread as it winds onto the bobbin. Many machines will have a little tension disc you take the thread around but your technique is important too.

Usually you take the thread from your spool of cotton on the right, across to the left on the top of the machine and around a tension disc, or through a thread eye, then back to the right to your bobbin winding spindle, if your bobbin has holes in it, then pull the thread tail up through a hole and pop it onto the spindle. Engage the spindle by pushing across against the stop. Now start winding SLOWLY while holding the thread tail up in the air until the core of the bobbin has been covered in fully and your thread has covered up the starting point to hold the beginning tail. Stop winding, and trim the tail off against the bobbin with a pair of snips. Now resume winding at 1/2 to 3/4 speed and do two things, one with each hand. With one hand put tension onto the top of the spool you are winding thread off - use the curve of your scissors handle into the indent on top. And with your other hand, give the thread a nudge as it winds onto the bobbin to ensure you wind fully across the whole bobbin evenly. Watch it carefully to ensure that you get a smooth even wind.

An analagy: if you wind the garden hose onto the hose reel really fast and let it go anywhich way, the hose will kink and wind mostly in the middle then the reel's full and you've still got half the hose to put away. Thread is the same, its been wound onto a spool by a machine in a very precise way; you want the same smooth evenly tensioned winding onto your bobbin so that when you stitch out the seam the thread is consistently fed off the bobbin.

Don't be tempted to wind flat out and just let it take its own path as you won't get good smooth bobbins of thread. And if you let the thread come off the spool at a fast pace the spool may bounce around, causing fluctuations in the tension on the thread. When you stich a seam, the thread will relax unevenly in your seam causing puckers and ho hum stitching.

Simple stuff but it makes a difference!

on Oct 02, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

I have a new Bernina 350 and the bobbin doesn't wind on evenly. If left to do it automatically it ends up wrapped around the bobbin spool. Is this normal?


the thread has to be pretty tight around the bobbin tension guide
but I would suggest if you can't get it to wind correctly to have it check to see if there is a problem with it

May 12, 2012 | Bernina Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Bernina 135 bobbin winds unevenly


If you are finding that the bobbin is winding with more thread towards one edge of the bobbin than the other, the bobbin winder motor needs to be adjusted so that the angle of the winder shaft is properly aligned with the tension disc next to the head cover. Unfortunately, unlike many of the other models, you have to remove the covers on the Activa range to get at the adjuster. There is a spring-tensioned screw just to the left of the bobbin winder motor that adjusts the angle of the motor and therefore how it loads the bobbin. If the winder is loading the bobbin with most of the thread towards the bottom edge, the screw should be turned clockwise and if most towards the top, it should be turned anticlockise. Make adjustments until the thread is winding evenly or, at least, towards the centre of the bobbin.

If you are finding that your bobbin is being loaded somewhat randomly, make sure you are using the vertical spool holder to hold the spool and that you've got a foam pad under the thread spool. Route the thread through the thread guide before winding around the tension disc in the correct direction (see the arrow on the case) and ensure that the spool and thread do not vibrate unduly when the bobbin is being wound. If you let the spool vibrate whilst the bobbin is loading, it may result in varying tension on the thread and uneven winding onto the bobbin.

Oct 02, 2011 | Bernina Activa 130

1 Answer

How to fill a bobbin on Virtuosa 150


Put the thread spool on the vertical spool holder with a sponge pad underneath. Wind the thread off the spool and through the small wire thread guide next to the spool holder. Take the thread across the top of the sewing arm to the tension unit just next to the gap in the case through which the thread is normally threaded - the tension unit looks like the top of a shiny screw without the slots in it. Wind the thread in a clockwise direction around the tension unit once and pull the thread with a bit of tension until it slips into the sprung gap around the underside of the shiny part. Slip the end of the thread through one of the holes in the bobbin and, preferably, wind a few turns on, then push the bobbin onto the bobbin winder shaft at the right-hand end of the top of the machine. Turn the bobbin clockwise by hand a few more times to make sure the thread is 'locked' onto the bobbin and then just push the lever adjacent to the bobbin winder to the left. To wind the bobbin, you then press the foot controller and either stop when you've got enough thread on the bobbin or let it stop automatically when full. Make sure you dont go so fast that the spool rattles-around on the spool holder otherwise this could spoil the way the bobbin gets filled.

Sep 28, 2011 | Bernina Virtuosa 150

1 Answer

Bobbin stich is uneven and a tangled mess


you can dowload a manual from the singer website http://www.singerco.com/accessories/manuals.html

If the bottom stitching is uneven, its mostly the top thread not under tension correctly so check the tension dial and the threading up from the thread spool to the needle.

Also, review how you wind a bobbin, you want a nice smooth wind, not twisting or uneven build across the bobbin. The manual for this machine is pretty brief on this but bobbin winding is crucial to getting a good even flow from the bobbin when stitching seams. You want to wind thread smoothly onto the bobbin, across the full width of it, not just mainly in the middle. Give the thread a nudge with your finger tip to fill top and bottom as it winds.

Also, ensure the thread goes through the bobbin tension disc on top of the machine, and even then, use your scissors handle to put some downward gentle pressure onto the thread spool you are winding off so it doesn't jump or bounce as you wind. Wind the bobbin to 3/4 full, then stop.

And lastly, load the bobbin correctly following the manual directions, make sure it is turning the right way in the bobbin case. Also look at page 16, it shows the "dangle" test where you can check the tension on the bobbin case is right, you should be able to dangle the bobbin by the thread tail and it should "stay" but you should be able to pull on it to release thread too. Adjust the little tension screw in minute increments to get this right. Bobbin case tension springs can fail or break too, so check this out.

Hope this helps you; it is my experience that 90% of machine issues are caused by blunt or wrong sized needles, wrong threading, no tension or incorrect tension or lack of maintenance.

Apr 16, 2011 | White Sewing 1888 Mechanical Sewing...

1 Answer

The tension on the bobbin is giving big loops and then breaking


This could be one of the following:
  • wrong bobbin for the machine
  • bobbin loaded the wrong way - must rotate anticlockwise when you pull the thread
  • thread not into the tension spring/device on the bobbin holder correctly
  • bobbin wound badly, uneven tension, loose or uneven across the bobbin
  • poor quality or old dry brittle thread could cause the breaking (but the loops is definitely tension issues).
This is a top loading bobbin machine machine and you can download a manual from
http://www.singerco.com/accessories/manuals.html

Here is the threading diagram from the manual.

tally_girl_21.jpg It is important to click the thread down into the tension spring on all top loading bobbin machines and then pull gently on the thread to check that it is under tension, you should feel firm resistance when you pull the thread. If not, then take it out, and try again.

Other thing to look at is how the bobbin is wound. It is necessary to wind a bobbin smoothly and with some tension on the spool as the thread comes off it. Best analogy is the garden hose reel. If you wind it up and don't control where the hose goes onto the reel it will all lump up in the middle, and you won't get all the hose onto it. And then when you go to pull the hose out, it will jam and be difficult to pull. Same with bobbin thread. You want a nice neat even fill across the whole width of the bobbin, not just the middle. To achieve this make sure you use the bobbin winder tension disc when winding. Also use the spool cap on top of the thread spool to stop it from bouncing around as it unwinds - the thread will then wind off around the spool cap and this keeps it running smoothly and not twisting and jerking. If you don't have a spool cap then put the curved handle of a pair of scissors on top of the thread spool to tension it while you wind the bobbin. Also watch the bobbin as it winds, give the thread a nudge with your finger to control the fill onto the bobbin so it winds top, bottom and middle of the bobbin evenly.

I would suggest the following:
clean out the race following the manual directions to remove the bobbin holder, clean in this area, replace it. Wind a fresh bobbin and then load it into the machine, following the manual instructions carefully. Also thread the top of the machine following the manual, put in a new sharp needle from the pack, turn the top tension dial to a medium number (often 5 if dial goes from zero to 10).

Now test sew again. Look at the seam, if you have loops on the bottom of the fabric, underside, then the top thread tension is too loose or not in the top tension discs fully. Generally you should not need to adjust the tension on the bobbin thread for these machines.


Apr 13, 2011 | Singer 5050 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

The bobbin winds really loose and uneven and then gets caught up when I'm sewing. I've checked I'm threading it correctly when winding... seems to be worse with polyester and embroidery thread. Help!


You need to keep tension on the thread spool as you wind the bobbin to avoid this from happening. Also, is there a little tension device to take the thread around between the spool and the bobbin winder? Some machines have a little silver button tensioner purely for bobbin winding to keep the thread flowing smoothly.

But I always do the following anyway just to ensure a smooth bobbin. Take the thread from your spool, through the eyelet or tensioner, then back to the bobbin and put the tail end up through a hole in the top of the bobbin. Now put the bobbin onto the winder and click it against the stop. Place the curved handle of a pair of scissors onto the top of the thread spool and apply some gentle pressure to stop the spool from bouncing and jumping while winding off. Keep doing this through the winding process.

Start the bobbin winding mechanisim, its a button on my Janome 6500, yours might be a little different. HOLD the thread tail until you've got coverage over the whole bobbin area catching the starting point. Stop, trim the thread tail off top of the bobbin with scissors, then restart winding again. Watch as the thread winds and give it a nudge with your finger tip to the top or bottom so the bobbin winds evenly across the whole spool's width.

Best analogy here is when you wind the garden hose onto the reel, if it goes on all over the place you never get the whole length on neatly, but if you wind it on neatly in an even tight coil across the spool, then back again, then repeat, you get a tidy hose. But just wind madly, it all builds up in the middle, you can't get it all onto the reel, and it won't pull out nicely next time you need it. Same thing with your SM thread.

Polyester and silky embroidery threads will be worse too as they are silky, so if the thread hasn't been wound on smoothly and under tension, then it will "collapse" with gravity, then when you use the bobbin, the thread is going to be caught on itself, will feed unevenly and be stretched, then loose, giving you less than perfect stitch tension.

My other bobbin tip is store the bobbins in a plastic bobbin tray so they are lying on their edges and under a cover. Keeps them neater and they are less likely to unwind stray threads around your sewing cabinet if you store them on the spool pins build onto the cabinet door - and it keeps the thread dust free. But I do not keep thread on bobbins for long, prefer to wind a fresh one off a new spool when I start a project and can usually complete a garment with a 3/4 filled bobbin, use the remaining few metres for handsewing, then junk the rest. Then I put the thread spool that is left back into a sealed takeway container to keep it away from UV, dust and moisture.

I hope this assists you with your machine and certainly if this doesn't resolve the bobbin issues, then I'd suggest you visit your dealer and ask them to demonstrate the technique on your machine to see if there is a technical issue with it.

Apr 10, 2011 | Elna Xplore 8600 Computerized Sewing...

2 Answers

I wound a new bobbin and now I can't get it on the bobbin winding spindle. I have the exact same problem with a husqvarna 400


When you wind a bobbin on a Husqvarna and you leave the machine threaded to wind the bobbin through the needle, you must take the thread down below the foot (a metal foot only) before you take the thread up to the bobbin winder. If you take the thread directly from the needle it creates too much tension on the thread and crushes the center of the bobbin so that either you can't get the bobbin off the spindle or in some cases it damages the bobbin completely.

Some threads, the kind that can stretch slightly when pulled, shouldn't be wound through the needle at all. Instead go through the first guilde and then straight down to the little metal "button like" guide and then to the bobbin. It will create much less tension on the thread and wind it much better.

Oct 11, 2009 | Husqvarna Designer I

2 Answers

I have a designer 1 that won't release the bobbin.


Winding too tight;
Whenever your bobbin won’t come off any Viking, Designer 1 included, it’s because it wound too tight. This is how you know. It went on easy! To get it off, don’t pry, slowly unwind all thread, it will change shapes and let go of the bobbin winder. My favorite way to wind a bobbin on a Viking is to thread the machine through the needle and go under the foot then up to the bobbin winder (it has to be under the foot or it winds too tight. If it still winds too tight, lay your thread down instead of standing it up, the weight of the thread can increase tension on the winding process also check that you use a spool cap as large as or slightly larger than your spool. If it still winds tight. I’ll explain what bad thread can do.

Test your thread quality to start, thread your machine and LIFT the presser foot (this opens the tension disks). Pull your top thread straight back. If you feel no tension no mater how much thread you pull, your thread is good. If that your machine passes that test (tip: always check your thread this way when you thread your machine)

Mar 12, 2009 | Husqvarna Designer I

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