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How to create a duel system for home heating... I want to link a multi fuel stove to an existing oil system. 12 radiators. Charnwood stove.

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Mother Earth News offers sugestions on how to set your home up for dual fuel systems. Check out www.motherearthnews.com

Posted on Jul 21, 2008

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My indoor lg mini split unit the cool light flashes 4 time what's wrong


Indoor unit faults = CH04 or C4
Fascia LED's
- RED = None
- GREEN = 4 Flash
Contents = Drain Pump / Float Switch
Case of Error = Float Switch Open Circuit (High Level Water Alarm)
Indoor Status = Off

clean your condensate drain line you can do this with a shop vac,
Read more: http://dgoma.es/multisplit_lg/lg-multi-split-units-error-code/#ixzz34dr3Cu00
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May 26, 2014 | LG LMN127HVT LMN127HVT 12 000 BTU Ductless...

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We have hot water but no heat,we have an oil furnace


Source of heat not a problem, if you have hot water. Not sure how you heat your home radiators new heat sump? air conduct need more info to help if i can. are you thermo controled as a seperate system (plug in with boiler) would like to help if i can?

Jan 25, 2012 | Air Conditioners

2 Answers

The emergency heat will not turn on in my system. I also noticed the emergency heat light does not turn illuminate on the Honeywell HZ322 TrueZone Panel even if the emergency heat button is pressed. The...


Yes, I believe you are correct concerning the circuit panel.

Regarding your heat pump not keeping up ...depending on what part of the country you live in, heat pumps are not the best thing to heat with. As you probably already know, once it reaches 32 degrees outside, the heat pump stops working and the electric furnace or heat strips come on to supply warm air. Frankly, when that happens, it's like turning on your kitchen toaster and blowing air across it with an electric fan. Doesn't sound to efficient does it. Plus, your electric meter is spinning like crazy and the power company is falling in love with you.

In my area (Virginia) most new home construction is now using what's called a dual fuel system. It's a heat pump, but it has a gas furnace backup for when it reaches 35 degrees outdoors. It's very, very efficient and a very comfortable heat. The gas furnace can run on either Natural Gas or Propane Gas.
In most cases this can be added to an existing heat pump system. The only thing necessary is the Gas Furnace, since you already have a heat pump and all the duct work. Could probably be added for a whole lot less than you''d expect.

The other option is to add a vent-free gas fireplace or vent-free gas logs, if you have an existing solid fuel burning fireplace. They are great for zone heating and/or supplemental heating. Plus, if you have a power outage in the middle of the winter, they'll still work, as they don't require any electricity.

I didn't mean to run own, but I hope all this helps you solve your heating problem.
Please let me know.

Rich

Feb 09, 2011 | Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air...

1 Answer

The plumbers have installed radiators with the hot pipe on the top right side of the radiator and the return pipe at the bottom right side of the same radiator does this sound correct?


Not normal but should work fine.Since heat rises this will allow the radiator to heat up a little quicker than if introducing the heat at the bottom. If the system ran long enough it would not effect the outcome of heating your home.

Jan 18, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

How to zone a heating system with duel fuel


This would require zone dampers, zone board, and multiple thermostats

Jan 15, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I live in Wisconsin (so it gets cold) and I just built a 1,000 sqft detached garage with 9' walls and I looking for the most efficient way to heat it. I will generally only be using it on weekends, but,...


Hi Rob - There are a bunch of variables that come into play. If you're going to use liquid fuels such as K1 kerosene or "home heating oil" (red dyed diesel fuel without the "road use tax"), you have to consider the tank location. Since home heating oil is really dyed diesel fuel, is reacts to cold just like diesel fuel does. It begins to gel - paraffin separates and the fuel gets cloudy around the 20 degree F mark and can clog the supply lines and filter. It gets worse as it gets colder. You can get around this somewhat by installing larger diameter and insulated fuel supply lines and moving the filter bowl assembly inside where it won't be subjected to that much cold. Your dealer may put additives in the fuel to prevent separation or you can add it yourself. K1 can be added to home heating oil tank to reduce clouding and straight K1 can be burned by an oil burner (you can not burn home heating oil in a K1 heater though). K1 on the other hand, flows just fine at these temps and lower. You'll need to supply storage tanks for these fuels.

The amount of heat or BTU's per gallon of these two fuels is significant. Home heating oil checks in with 50% more heat with around 140,000 BTUs per gallon while K1 has just over 90,000 BTUs per gallon. Cost is another factor. Typically, K1 sells for more than home heating oil, but has the benefits above. Prices for home heating oil and K1 are volatile and change daily and from dealer to dealer. Many dealers will lock prices and / or offer purchasing plans.

Next is natural gas (or just plain "gas") and propane (or LP). Gas is usually delivered via underground supply pipes and propane is delivered by truck to your on-site tank in areas that don't have the underground gas pipe infrastructure in place. The LP dealer will usually supply and install an above ground tank. You'll likely have just LP or both LP and gas available in your area. Heating appliances must be set up to burn one fuel or the other - not both. It is often a relatively inexpensive operation to convert from one fuel to the other, meaning separate appliances for either are not required. Gas prices are usually fixed for different times of the year, while LP prices may change daily and based on the volume used. Lower usage customers often pay more than their next door neighbors that use more from propane the same company. Like home heating oil and K1 dealers, many companies offer price locks and purchasing plans.

Gas and LP heating appliances burn "clean" meaning that there is little smoke, soot or tuning needed. Oil and K1 however, require regular tuning and cleaning to achieve maximum efficiency. Oil and K1 will burn but not rapidly combust - as gasoline would. LP and gas however, will explode if allowed to collect in an enclosed area and ignited by spark from a ringing telephone, etc. Prices of the heating appliance itself come into play as well.

You can heat the space by your choice of fuel and method of heat delivery. Forced hot air is probably going to be your best choice, but you could choose a forced hot water system if you add antifreeze to it. You'll also need a source of water to make up any lost due to pressure relief valve discharges, etc. If you chose the forced hot air system, you could probably get away without the expense of duct work - where a forced hot water design will require baseboard radiant heaters or a fan forced hot water coil.

That should be enough to get you thinking.. good luck!
Lastly, electric heat. Electric heat is 100% efficient, but is probably the most costly to operate. It's listed because it is available - not because I recommend it.

The best thing you can do is insulate. Insulation pays you back quicker with each rise in fuel costs. Put money into proper insulation as you can. Low E glass in your windows, weather strip doors, etc.

Nov 12, 2010 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Wood burning heater when putting wood into stove lots of smoke comes into the house when door is opened.


It ain't drafting right or you have the damper closed. Look for obstructions in the smoke stack.
Wood burning tips
  • Burn only wood. No garbage, plastics, rubber, paint or oil, briquettes, paper, etc. Burning these items releases harmful chemicals into the air.
  • Burn Wise Program from EPA: Emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood.
  • Build small, hot fires instead of large, smoldering ones.
  • Don't "bed the fire down" for the night. Holding a fire overnight is a fire hazard and can create serious indoor and outdoor air pollution problems.
  • Open your damper if the smoke is dark. Dark smoke indicates more pollution is being produced and fuel is being wasted.
  • Keep your stove clean and well-maintained. Follow manufacturer guidelines; replace catalytic stove filters every 1-4 years. Have your chimney checked and cleaned at least once a year.
Use seasoned wood The best fuel for woodstoves is dry, "seasoned" wood. Seasoned wood has a moisture content of about 20% or less. It tends to be dark in color, cracked on the ends, light in weight and has bark that is easily broken or peeled. Here are some tips for preparing seasoned wood:
  • Split the wood to help it dry. Wood will dry out more quickly and burn best if the wood is cut to about 3 1/2 inches to 6 inches in diameter.
  • Cover the split firewood to protect it from the weather and stack it loosely in alternating layers, at least 6 inches off the ground.
  • Time must be given to allow the wood to reach 20% or less moisture required for seasoned wood. This process takes approximately 6-12 months. Think ahead and buy next winter's wood well in advance.
It is recommended an annual chimney cleaning to remove creosote build up and to identify potential problems. Things to consider:
  • The Chimney cap may be plugged by debris.
  • Catalytic combustor and baffles are exposed to very high heat and deteriorate as used. Replace every 1-4 years depending on use.
  • Stovepipe angles and bolts are subject to corrosion.
  • Gaskets on airtight stove doors need replacement every few years. Gaskets and seals are used by the appliance designer to control the location and flow of air into the appliance.
  • Check seams on stoves sealed with furnace cement. Seams may leak and cause you to loose valuable heat and reduce the efficiency of the unit.
  • Replace broken or missing firebricks.
  • Keep the floor of your stove clean of debris and ash.
-from the web

Nov 02, 2010 | Air Conditioners

3 Answers

EM HEAT.... does it stand for ECONOMY HEAT or EMERGENCY HEAT? They both conflict. Someone's misinformed.


It stands for Emergency Heat. (Back up heat) . Normally you will find it on heat pumps. It's used manually when the compressor goes out on a heat pump. It's used automatically by the unit when it's so cold outside the heat pump can't keep up. This happens when there is not enough heat in the air to draw heat from. This happens at around 23 degrees. I hope this explains what emergency heat is and what it's used for.

Oct 16, 2009 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

2 Answers

Would like to know the wattage oiutput on my vulcan duel fuel oil heater


¿ Oil heaters do not generate wattage. On the name plate for the unit it may give you an AMP draw. Multiply Amps times Volts to get wattage use when in operation.

May 01, 2008 | Air Conditioners

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