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I dont seem to be able to contect my new wireless g universal range extender/ access point

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The Control Panel/Network Connections should show your wireless card. If you have a laptop, make sure the card is powered on. Most laptops use the "Fn" and "F2" button to control the card.Somee cards load a software program you can see in the taskbar by the clock.

Your router has settings for Channel, SSID, and Security. Be sure your card is set up to match them.

Once you get it connected, be sure to enable some kind of security to prevent unauthorized use of your internet connection.
Your router and card must have the same settings. Passwords (keys) are case sensitive.

Posted on Jul 18, 2008

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Weak signal on pci card


The signal strength for wireless devices depends on a number of factors including:
The distance from the wireless router / access point or gateway.
The objects in the path of the direct line of sight signal, i.e. types and thickness of walls, metal objects such as kitchen appliances etc.
The directional characteristics of the aerial on the router / access point.
The physical position of the router, i.e. is is low down or high up in the room - the best position would normally be at a height which gives the best / clearest footprint for the wireless signal.

Do you have other wireless devices - what is the signal strength like for those when positioned close to the device with the Ralink PCI card?

How many wireless provider devices do you have, i.e. do you just have the one wireless router / access point or have you extended your wireless network using a second router or access point to give greater coverage?

Are there other competing wireless networks close to your own network, if so, you may need to consider setting a different channel than the default channel 11 that many devices use.

Also try to keep your computer wireless devices away from other devices such as wireless telephones, wireless remote controls etc.

Note: the slot used to host the PCI wireless card is unlikely to make any difference as the physical location of the aerial is only minimally changed by a couple of centimetres. Try rotating the computer case so that the aerial is directly facing the wireless router (to remove the case as another cause of weakening the signal being received).

Dec 31, 2011 | PC Desktops

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Computer Acronyms


ADSL - Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line
AGP - Accelerated Graphics Port
ALI - Acer Labs, Incorporated
ALU - Arithmetic Logic Unit
AMD - Advanced Micro Devices
APC - American Power Conversion
ASCII - American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASIC - Application Specific Integrated Circuit
ASPI - Advanced SCSI Programming Interface
AT - Advanced Technology
ATI - ATI Technologies Inc.
ATX - Advanced Technology Extended

BFG - BFG Technologies
BIOS - Basic Input Output System
BNC - Barrel Nut Connector

CAS - Column Address Signal
CD - Compact Disk
CDR - Compact Disk Recorder
CDRW - Compact Disk Re-Writer
CD-ROM - Compact Disk - Read Only Memory
CFM - Cubic Feet per Minute (ft/min)
CMOS - Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor
CPU - Central Processing Unit
CTX - CTX Technology Corporation (Commited to Excellence)


DDR - Double Data Rate
DDR-SDRAM - Double Data Rate - Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory
DFI - DFI Inc. (Design for Innovation)
DIMM - Dual Inline Memory Module
DRAM - Dynamic Random Access Memory
DPI - Dots Per Inch
DSL - See ASDL
DVD - Digital Versatile Disc
DVD-RAM - Digital Versatile Disk - Random Access Memory

ECC - Error Correction Code
ECS - Elitegroup Computer Systems
EDO - Extended Data Out
EEPROM - Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory
EPROM - Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory
EVGA - EVGA Corporation

FC-PGA - Flip Chip Pin Grid Array
FDC - Floppy Disk Controller
FDD - Floppy Disk Drive
FPS - Frame Per Second
FPU - Floating Point Unit
FSAA - Full Screen Anti-Aliasing
FS - For Sale
FSB - Front Side Bus

GB - Gigabytes
GBps - Gigabytes per second or Gigabits per second
GDI - Graphical Device Interface
GHz - GigaHertz

HDD - Hard Disk Drive
HIS - Hightech Information System Limited
HP - Hewlett-Packard Development Company
HSF - Heatsink-Fan

IBM - International Business Machines Corporation
IC - Integrated Circuit
IDE - Integrated Drive Electronics
IFS- Item for Sale
IRQ - Interrupt Request
ISA - Industry Standard Architecture
ISO - International Standards Organization

JBL - JBL (Jame B. Lansing) Speakers
JVC - JVC Company of America

Kbps - Kilobits Per Second
KBps - KiloBytes per second

LG - LG Electronics
LAN - Local Are Network
LCD - Liquid Crystal Display
LDT - Lightning Data Transport
LED - Light Emitting Diode

MAC - Media Access Control
MB - MotherBoard or Megabyte
MBps - Megabytes Per Second
Mbps - Megabits Per Second or Megabits Per Second
MHz - MegaHertz
MIPS - Million Instructions Per Second
MMX - Multi-Media Extensions
MSI - Micro Star International

NAS - Network Attached Storage
NAT - Network Address Translation
NEC - NEC Corporation
NIC - Network Interface Card

OC - Overclock (Over Clock)
OCZ - OCZ Technology
OEM - Original Equipment Manufacturer

PC - Personal Computer
PCB - Printed Circuit Board
PCI - Peripheral Component Interconnect
PDA - Personal Digital Assistant
PCMCIA - Peripheral Component Microchannel Interconnect Architecture
PGA - Professional Graphics Array
PLD - Programmable Logic Device
PM - Private Message / Private Messaging
PnP - Plug 'n Play
PNY - PNY Technology
POST - Power On Self Test
PPPoA - Point-to-Point Protocol over ATM
PPPoE - Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet
PQI - PQI Corporation
PSU - Power Supply Unit

RAID - Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks
RAM - Random Access Memory
RAMDAC - Random Access Memory Digital Analog Convertor
RDRAM - Rambus Dynamic Random Access Memory
ROM - Read Only Memory
RPM - Revolutions Per Minute

SASID - Self-scanned Amorphous Silicon Integrated Display
SCA - SCSI Configured Automatically
SCSI - Small Computer System Interface
SDRAM - Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory
SECC - Single Edge Contact Connector
SODIMM - Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Module
SPARC - Scalable Processor ArChitecture
SOHO - Small Office Home Office
SRAM - Static Random Access Memory
SSE - Streaming SIMD Extensions
SVGA - Super Video Graphics Array
S/PDIF - Sony/Philips Digital Interface

TB - Terabytes
TBps - Terabytes per second
Tbps - Terabits per second
TDK - TDK Electronics
TEC - Thermoelectric Cooler
TPC - TipidPC
TWAIN - Technology Without An Important Name

UART - Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
USB - Universal Serial Bus
UTP - Unshieled Twisted Pair

VCD - Video CD
VPN - Virtual Private Network

WAN - Wide Area Network
WTB - Want to Buy
WYSIWYG - What You See Is What You Get

XGA - Extended Graphics Array
XFX - XFX Graphics, a Division of Pine
XMS - Extended Memory Specification
XT - Extended Technology

on Jun 04, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I have an old Victorian house with an apartment in the back above the barn/garage. I am trying to get wireless internet connections to all sections of the house but my current router (3 years old) is not...


Hello.

Yes. As you mentioned, you have a Victorian house, with very thick walls. I'd suggest drawing a diagram showing the rooms and floors that need access.

First, if possible, I would place your router in a centralized location, if all 5 people need similar strength access.

Then what you need are multiple repeaters to go with your router. Place them strategically, so that the wireless access signal can bounce off of them and go around walls, instead of through walls and floors.

Hope this helps.

Nov 22, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

What is the difference between a wireless access point and wireless router?


To have an access point you need some kind of routed on your network already. For most home users they just add a wireless access point if they have an older router that does not have built in wireless. If you do not have a router already, you want a wireless router for sure.

For businesses they buy multiple access points to extend the range of their wireless networks. They still need a router, which would not be wireless in most cases, it would be a commercial grade router. Then they have access points all over the building (or buildings) where they need wireless access.

Please make sure you rate my answer 4 thumbs up, it is extremely important to me. I would be forever grateful if you could do so. If you need more help on this question please just respond to my answer here and I will get right back to you.


Thanks
Tim

Oct 12, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I need to secure my home wirless network


1) Secure your wireless router or access point administration interface
Almost all routers and access points have an administrator password that's needed to log into the device and modify any configuration settings. Most devices use a weak default password like "password" or the manufacturer's name, and some don't have a default password at all. As soon as you set up a new WLAN router or access point, your first step should be to change the default password to something else. You may not use this password very often, so be sure to write it down in a safe place so you can refer to it if needed. Without it, the only way to access the router or access point may be to reset it to factory default settings which will wipe away any configuration changes you've made.

2) Don't broadcast your SSID
Most WLAN access points and routers automatically (and continually) broadcast the network's name, or SSID (Service Set IDentifier). This makes setting up wireless clients extremely convenient since you can locate a WLAN without having to know what it's called, but it will also make your WLAN visible to any wireless systems within range of it. Turning off SSID broadcast for your network makes it invisible to your neighbors and passers-by (though it will still be detectible by WLAN "sniffers").

3)Enable WPA encryption instead of WEP
802.11's WEP (Wired Equivalency Privacy) encryption has well-known weaknesses that make it relatively easy for a determined user with the right equipment to crack the encryption and access the wireless network. A better way to protect your WLAN is with WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access). WPA provides much better protection and is also easier to use, since your password characters aren't limited to 0-9 and A-F as they are with WEP. WPA support is built into Windows XP (with the latest Service Pack) and virtually all modern wireless hardware and operating systems. A more recent version, WPA2, is found in newer hardware and provides even stronger encryption, but you'll probably need to download an XP patch in order to use it.

4) Reduce your WL-AN transmitter power
You won't find this feature on all wireless routers and access points, but some allow you lower the power of your WL-AN transmitter and thus reduce the range of the signal. Although it's usually impossible to fine-tune a signal so precisely that it won't leak outside your home or business, with some trial-and-error you can often limit how far outside your premises the signal reaches, minimizing the opportunity for outsiders to access your WL-AN.

5) Disable remote administration

Most WL AN routers have the ability to be remotely administered via the Internet. Ideally, you should use this feature only if it lets you define a specific IP address or limited range of addresses that will be able to access the router. Otherwise, almost anyone anywhere could potentially find and access your router. As a rule, unless you absolutely need this capability, it's best to keep remote administration turned off

Thanks
Have great day

Sep 04, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Want wireless paswrd


Hi!

Depends on the setting of your access point or wireless router. To get the wireless password you need to login to the web-based configuration of your access point or wireless router. To access the router or access point go to your web browser and type in the ip address of your access point or router.
login and get your wireless security code there.

I hope this helps.

Jun 13, 2010 | HP PC Desktops

1 Answer

How can i connect WRT54G(Router) with two WAP54G(Access Point) in Repeater Mode?


you should make sure the access point securty level and your router is same acess key is same and access points are in range contect me suyyam@gmail.com

Apr 24, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have a D-Link wireless router, it is a DI 524 model. Well I just recently had to reinstall everything on my desktop computer, which my wireless router and dsl pipe are hooked up to. I have a laptop with...


IF YOUR WIRELESS NETWORK ACCESS POINT IS CONNECTED BUT YOU CANT GET ONLINE,YOU WILL NEED TO GO TO YOUR DLINK ONLINE ROUTER SETTINGS PAGE AND CHANGE YOUR PASSPHRASE KEY WHICH YOU NEED TO CONNECT THE ACCESS POINT TO THE WIRELESS ROUTER.BEFORE YOU DO THIS THOUGH,OPEN UP THE NETWORK CONNECTIONS WIZARD ON YOUR LAPTOP AND VIEW"AVAILABLE WIRELESS NETWORKS".IF YOU SEE YOUR NETWORK LISTED,HIGHLIGHT THE NETWORK AND PUSH THE CONNECT BUTTON.WINDOWS WILL ASK YOU FOR A PASSPHRASE OR PASSWORD.ENTER THAT AND CLICK CONNECT.YOU SHOULD THEN GET CONNECTED TO THE WEB.IF YOU DONT HAVE A PASSPHRASE OR PASSWORD,THAT IS WHY YOU CANNOT CONNECT THRU THE ROUTER AND YOU WILL THEN NEED TO CREATE A NEW PASSPHRASE AT THE D-LINK WEB SETTINGS PAGE.GOOD LUCK.

Aug 22, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Replaced Linksys Wireless-B 2.4GHz 807.11b Router and Wireless B 2.4GHz 802.11b Wireless-B Notebook Adapter with Linksys-N Ultra Range Plus Wireless-N Gigabit Router, and Wireless N Ultra Range plus Dual...


Try resetting your IP address:
The laptop may be trying to use the IP address from the old router.

1) Click Start (assuming Windows 2000, XP, or Vista)
2) Click Run
3) Type in CMD
This will take you to a black command box
4) Type in: ipconfig/release
The chart should show your IP address as 0.0.0.0
Once this has happened, proceed to step 5
5) Type in: ipconfig/renew
You should now see a new IP address listed.

Also note that you need to set up your network key (assuming that you are using one) on both the router and laptop.
Make sure that your router is set up to perform as DHCP server.

FW

Apr 30, 2008 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I cant get my ps3 to work with my wireless broadband


Settings > Network Settings > Internet Connection Settings (wireless connection)
Internet Connection Settings (wireless connection) This setting is available only on PS3™ systems that are equipped with the wireless LAN feature.

Set the method for connecting the system to the Internet. Internet connection settings vary depending on the network environment and the devices in use. The following procedure describes a typical setup when connecting to the Internet wirelessly.
1.
Check that the settings for the access point have been completed.
Check that there is an access point connected to a network with Internet service near the system. Settings for the access point are typically set using a PC. For details, contact the person who set up or maintains the access point.
2.
Confirm that an Ethernet cable is not connected to the PS3™ system.
3.
Select in_networkset.gif (Network Settings) under in_setting.gif (Settings) in the home menu.
4.
Select [Internet Connection Settings].
Select [Yes] when a confirmation screen is displayed stating that you will be disconnected from the Internet.
5.
Select [Easy].
connectwired002.jpg 6.
Select [Wireless].
connectwireless001.jpg 7.
Select [Scan].
A list of access points within the range of the PS3™ system is displayed.

Depending on the model of PS3™ system in use, you may have the option [Automatic]. Select [Automatic] when using an access point that supports automatic setup. If you follow the on-screen instructions, the necessary settings will be completed automatically. For information on access points that support automatic setup, contact your local retailer.
connectwireless002.jpg 8.
Select the access point that you want to use.
An "SSID" is an identification name assigned to an access point. If you do not know which SSID you should use or if an SSID is not displayed, contact the person who set up or maintains the access point for assistance.
connectwireless003.jpg 9.
Check the SSID for the access point.
10.
Select the security settings that you want to use.
The types of security settings vary depending on the access point. Contact the person who set up or maintains the access point for information on which setting to select.
connectwireless004.jpg 11.
Enter the encryption key.
The encryption key is displayed as a series of [*]. If you do not know the encryption key, contact the person who set up or maintains the access point for assistance.
connectwireless005.jpg When you have finished entering the encryption key and have confirmed the network configuration, a list of settings will be displayed.

Depending on the network environment, additional settings for PPPoE, proxy server or IP address may be required. For details on these settings, refer to the information from your Internet service provider or the instructions supplied with the network device.
12.
Save your settings.
13.
Test the connection.
If you select [Test Connection], the system will attempt to connect to the Internet.
14.
Confirm the connection test results.
If a successful connection has been made, information on the network will be displayed.

Hints
  • If the connection fails, follow the on-screen instructions to check your settings. Also refer to the information from your Internet service provider and the instructions supplied with the network device in use.
  • If you test the connection immediately after selecting [Automatic] > [AOSS™] in step 7, the router settings may not be completed and the connection may fail. Wait approximately 1 or 2 minutes before testing the connection.

Mar 12, 2008 | PC Desktops

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