Question about Rockford Fosgate Power 1500BD Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Subs lock in place. Only direct current comes out of the speaker output

Amp is NOT in protect, and turns on without over heating. No fuses were blown. I put it in a 65 mustang ran for 1 hour. Turned off the car, turned it back on and heard a thud. Any help??

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 631 Answers

The amp has failed and will need to be repaired.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Posted on Jul 18, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to fix blown sub (replace fuses etc)...? stop protective light illuminitating?


The first thing to try is to disconnect the sub and all speakers from the amp's output block. The only things that you need connected to the amp are the 12V power, the ground wire, and the remote wire to turn it on. If the protection light comes on with only these three wires connected - your amp has been damaged internally and will either need to be repaired or replaced.

Jul 27, 2013 | Car Amplifiers

1 Answer

When i hook my one 12inch sub up to a sony xplod 1000w amp the amp gose into protect mode when you turn it up it just stop playing


yes once in protect the amplifier is cut off because the current drain is more and can damage the outputs.
You might have to check the impedance of the speakers to confirm if this is lower that the rating prescribed for the outputs.
Also try to lower down the low frequency so as the load reduces.
If not the sub woofer is not matching and must be changed.

Sep 21, 2010 | Sony Car Amplifiers

1 Answer

My amp has power but then immediately goes red into protect mode.


Ok, being an old-school "back yard" installer when i began, gave me 2 immediate possible diagnosis for your problem. I was running a Kicker zx550.3 amp to 2 Polk DB 12'inch Subs rated 600w max 1500w. I also used a LOC converter (Line Output Converter) in order to use my stock Bose stereo since it did not have RCA outputs. Now shortly after running this setup (approx 2 weeks) I noticed a substantial drop in sound output and also noticed some ground noise/distortion coming thru the subs. After tracing my wires that connected my LOC to the Amp, and Rear Speaker Wires of my Radio to the LOC, I noticed that by jostling the wires there was a connection issue. If you are using your factory radio to power your regular component speakers (tweeters, coax, mids) then chances are your stereo feeds into a FACTORY INSTALLED amplifier. If thats the case, then you need to access a Wiring Diagram for the Harness coming off the Factory Amplifier! Once this is viewable, check the wiring and locate the "Amplifier to Radio Signal Wires" and also the "Amplifier to Speakers Signal Wires" ... Now go back to your LOC and look at the wires you tapped to get the Line Signals to the converter, and make sure that you havent tapped your lines off of the AMPLIFIER TO SPEAKER wires. These wires carry a small electrical current because they are coming powered from the Amplifier, and most Line Output Converters are PASSIVE, which could short the signal the LOC creates thus reducing your signal gain, but does have the capability to surge back to the Factory Amplifier, which could possibly melt the shielding of the factory wiring, and thus allow your signal to cross or ground out! If you can, try running another RCA input to your Sub-Amplifier from another source other than your car, and see if your protection lights go out and the amp returns to normal operation. If so then your LOC or Factory amp is to blame. If not, then the second diagnosis is much simpler, which is your Alternator current has been reduced due to many different possibilities, and you should acquire a .5 or 1 Farad Stiffening Capacitor which will reduce the excess draw from your charging system. But due to the first solution being my problem exactly, im willing to bet your's lies along the same variables... GL to you!

Apr 21, 2010 | Sony Car Amplifiers

1 Answer

No sound coming from speakers Blaupunkt GTA470 Amp


Amp Failure:
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors:
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.

Dec 31, 2008 | Blaupunkt PCA460 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

I have an audiobahn A8000t amp with the protection light on


There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure.
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.
Note:
I used the terms short and open on the previous paragraph. A short (short circuit) is a path through which current flows that should not be there. An open (open circuit) is a break in the circuit.

Dec 30, 2008 | AudioBahn A8000T Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Amp turns on just fine but no sound comes out


Amp Failure:
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors:
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.

Seems as you have blown an output. Seek repairs.

Dec 29, 2008 | Power Acoustik A3000DB Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Amp powers on, no sound from subs


the output is blown. It is in need of service.
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause.

Dec 28, 2008 | Alpine MRD-M1005 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Amp protector light


If the amp is in protect mode, it probably has shorted output transistors. To eliminate other possible problems, read through the following page. I'll assume that you've checked the amplifier's on-board fuses.

Amp in Protection - Troubleshooting

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Aug 15, 2008 | Car Amplifiers

1 Answer

No power


Disconnect the sub or speakers and turn on the amp, see what happens. If the amp turn on without the protection light, then your sub is blown. Also check to make sure ALL your fuses are good including the one under the hood. If you have a meter, test the fuse for continuity. The problem can also be a bad ground.

Aug 19, 2007 | Kicker KX150.2 Car Audio Amplifier

2 Answers

Overhaul light (red) stays on!


This is not a ovehaul light. It is called the protect indicator. It kicks in when the amp detects a fault on it's output. Disconnect the speaker / sub. Power up the amp and see if the light goes out. If it does you Sub is toast and needs to be replaced. If it stays on then the amp is done.

Jun 22, 2007 | Lightning Audio LA1.300.2 Car Audio...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Rockford Fosgate Power 1500BD Car Audio Amplifier Logo

Related Topics:

52 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Rockford Fosgate Car Amplifiers Experts

Pablo Gonzalez

Level 3 Expert

733 Answers

Tygh Duval
Tygh Duval

Level 2 Expert

290 Answers

Robert Rankin

Level 2 Expert

338 Answers

Are you a Rockford Fosgate Car Amplifier Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...