Question about Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Wiring speaker down to lowest ohm - Audio & Video Receivers

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 1,498 Answers

Wiring a single speaker won't change Ohms.

More than one is a different story.

Parallel wiring is what you're looking for:

Say you have two speakers and one speaker wire.
The positive speaker wire is connected to the positive terminal of each speaker. The same for the negative.

Wiring speakers 'Parallel' will lower the overall impedance according to the following formula:

1/Rtot=1/R1+1/R2+etc......

Say your speakers are 4 Ohms.

Then the formula would be:

1/Rtot=1/4 + 1/4

1/Rtot=1/2 (or .5) Now isolate Rtot

Rtot=1/0.5

Rtot = 2 (Try it on a calculator)

So two 4 ohm speakers in parallel reduces the impedance to two Ohms.

If you found this useful, please take a sec and rate this response.

Have fun,

Mike



Posted on Jul 17, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Jvc rx 5052 overload when volumes open


Could be....
  1. There's a short in your speaker wiring somewhere
  2. or a blown speaker
  3. or you are recycling the speakers from an old all-in-one system and they're too low Ohms
Check your speakers first. If they are less than 8 Ohms, or there's no label on them which gives the Impedance (in Ohms) then I'll lay money that they aren't suitable for the amp. Stop using them and get some proper 8 Ohm speakers.

Wiring shorts might be only a single strand of copper wire. But it's enough that at higher volumes it conducts enough current between the speaker terminals to trip the amp's protection mode.

Fix the problem. Go through your wiring. Check using a torch. If all looks good then it's a blown speaker.

Remove the speaker wires from the amp. Switch the amp on and turn the volume up full. The amp should stay on. Turn the volume down and switch off.

Now connect ONE speaker only. Try the amp on and volume up again. If it trips out then that's the faulty speaker. Repeat by adding one more speaker each time. When the amp trips, the last speaker added is the culpret.

Sep 08, 2014 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Speaker screech


For a starting point make sure that you are properly matched with you speakers for an 8 ohm system. Verify what your amp can handle and then make sure the speakers fit within that zone. A good amp can handle down to 2 ohms without a problem. Most like to operate at about 4 ohms at the lowest. If that is all good and you still have problems I will check back.

Sep 04, 2012 | Yamaha Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Keeps shutting off automatically and flashes Protect before it shuts down ??


FIRST DISS-CONNECT POWER FROM RECEIVER.... DO NOT ATTEMPT ANY SERVICE / TROUBLESHOOTING PROCEDURES TO ELECTRICAL DEVICES PRIOR TO REMOVING ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Now that the power cord is unplugged we can start. We shall start this repair by doing the easiest tests/checks first. That DOES NOT MEAN that just because the test is easy, its not very important.... every recommendation to follow is JUST as important as the next! (even if what is asked to be checked sounds un-important... its not! Follow this advice and YOU WILL RESOLVE YOUR ISSUE! TRUST ME... YOU WILL FIX THIS issue & before the days over.... SMILE & BE HAPPY! OK...... lets get started) First lets Check the power cord... unpluged? Sure hope so! Now the first thing that you have to do is check ALL the speaker connections at both ends!!!!!!!! (@ speaker & Receiver) Be certain ALL connections are tight & that NO strands of wire are shorting out the connections by touching each other...... the ends of ALL speaker wires must be seperate from each other at all times!!!! Each wire must ONLY be connected to one post/connector!!!!! Only ONE speaker should be connected to each terminal.... do not connect additional speakers to connections at any time!!!!!!!!!!! ONLY ONE can be applied to EACH OUTPUT TERMINAL!!!!!! If the speakers your using are fuse protected check fuses or circuit breakers accordingly. One open circuit (unconnected output terminal) or shorted (wires touching together) will immediatelly trigger receiver to SHUT DOWN!!!!!!! Receiver MUST have a load (speaker) connected to each speaker output to operate properly. Should all wires be found connected properly after checking at both speaker terminals & receiver terminals & problem is still accuring after reapplying power....... additional resistance checks must be made using an OHM Meter (available at most harware stores). If one of the speakers being used has burned out / gone bad / broke...... the only way to determine this condition is via a resistance measurment. Disconnect the speaker wire from the back of each speaker prior to doing resistance check!!! (a false reading will be observed if the speaker wire is still connected during this test) Now touch each of the two speaker terminals with one of the meter leads (the meter must be set to OHMS or RESISTANCE during this test for proper reading). The resistance reading observed should be NO LESS THAN 3 OHMS & NO MORE THAN 10 OHMS !!!!!!!!! Should the resistance/ohm's value of any speaker being used / connected to the receiver be found by the OHM Meter to read LESS than 3 OHMS = speaker shorted... MUST be replaced! Should the resistance/ohm's value of any speaker being used / connected to the receiver be found by the OHM Meter to read MORE than 10 OHMS = speaker open.... Must be replaced! Connecting damaged speakers to any receiver for a prolonged period of time WILL DAMAGE RECEIVER!!!!!!! Speaker resistance MUST be between 3 & 10 ohms to avoid damage to output transistors in receiver.... when receiver senses less than a resistance of 3 or more of a resistance than 10 @ ANY speaker terminal during operation................. IMMEDIATE AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN OF RECEIVER WILL OCCURE!!!!!!! You've got a bad speaker or a loose speaker wire or a shorted speaker wire...... check each of your speaker connections/terminals & you'll find your problem! When you do find a loose or shorted wire associated with the speakers......... you'll have found your problem! Trust me.... you CAN do it!!!! and when you do... you will SMILE !!!!!!!! & be HAPPY!!!!!!!
GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!

May 14, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I have the Harman Kardon AVS 235 reciever and once it gets to a certain volume (which is not too loud) it shuts down and goes into protective mode. All speaker wires are fine and no bare wires touching.


dust inside the receiver? prolly not too much.

how about ohmage? ensure that the speakers are the proper ohmage OR higher (at least prolly 8 ohms, 8? ) and ensure that you do not have multiple speakers hooked up to any channel, as two 8 ohm speakers in parallel on the same circuit would reduce the ohmage to 4 ohms.

also ensure that you do not have any fried vioce coils in any of your speakers (woofers, mids or tweeters). a fried voice coil could reduce the ohmage as well. if necesarry, use a multimeter to test each speakers ohmage, an 8 ohm speaker should not test any lower than 6 ohms at rest with a multimeter.

if its not an ohmage issue, and all speaker wires are verified fine, then it is the amp itself- prolly an integrated circuit chip, which are usually not repairable by the user.

Mar 09, 2011 | Harman Kardon AVR 235 Receiver

1 Answer

My marantz SR 7400 suddenly shuts down or goes into protect mode shows code CKPWR5


Most likely you have a speaker short, you need to check the ohms on each speaker disconnected from receiver if they are 8 ohms they should be close to that on the meter no more than a 1 and half ohm varience to what the speaker ohms says on the back. If they are ok you need to disconnect speaker wire from receiver and check for a short in the wire by connecting ohm meter leads to ends of the speaker wire you should get no reading if the wire is good. If this is all good you have a bad output transister in your receiver, but i dout this is the case because these transisters normally short to ground and blow a fuse. Hope you solve your problem good luck

May 24, 2010 | Marantz SR-7400 Receiver

1 Answer

I turn it on and it says protect and wont play.


That model of receiver goes into protect mode when there is really
low
resistance or a short on your speakers/wires. It does it to protect the
final drivers in your amp. Does it do the same thing with all of your
speakers disconnected? If it doesn't then you might have a problem with
one of your speakers or wires. Check your wires for shorts in them
first. That may be the only problem. That model is designed for 8 ohm
speakers, but you can go down two 6 ohms safely. I have a STR -D865 that

has been running 6 ohm speakers safely for almost 3 years now. A way to
check your speakers out is to take an ohm-meter across the terminals on
them(with the receiver unhooked). They should read anywhere between 8
and 4 ohms. Check with the manual on your speakers to see if they
correspond. If the resistance is really low, you may have a short in
that speaker. it is also possible that if they are 4 ohm speakers, you
could have damaged the drivers in your receiver. I know the model above
mine, (the 965) has a 4-8 ohm speaker selection switch on the back. The
lower models were not designed to run 4 ohm speakers. Hopefully this has

been of some help.

Brad

Jul 18, 2009 | Sony STR-D565 Receiver

1 Answer

RX-V2600 shuts down


Try checking your speaker impedance. If you have 6 ohm or 8 ohm speakers make sure the impedence matches. On the front panel hold down button that says "straight effect" while pressing Stanby/On button, it will default to SP IMP 8 min, press straight effect again, if you have 6 ohm speakers, then press Standby again to exit setting. Also, double check your speaker wires to make sure they are all connected, and none are loose.

I hope this helps.

Mar 31, 2009 | Yamaha RX-V2600 Receiver

2 Answers

Sony STR-DB940 Receiver Speaker Impedance Question


Whats the rating on the Plasma? How many watts at 4 ohms? If the plasma is rated 100 w at 8 ohm... hanging a 3.4 ohm load would put a lot of strain on the plasma's output amp. At 3.4 ohm the amp would be trying to delive close to 200 watts at full power. But it depends on how hot you normally run the volumn. Remember an amplifier output is AC volts. 1 ohm of resistance is close to a dead short. The amplifier would have to work its *** off to supply that type of power and would probably burn the output op-amps. If the outputs burn & it pumps any DC current through the speaker wire..the speakers would be toast...if not catch on fire. Try to keep the speaker load at or very cloe to the plasma's output load rating. Also if the plasma doesn't state it will handle loads down to 2 ohms...It probably won't.
Gene

Mar 02, 2009 | Sony STR-DB940 Receiver

1 Answer

Onkyo TX-DS777 Problem biwiring ohm ?


"Biwiring' is not an accepted term; I suspect you mean 'parallel.'
There are three different ways to connect loads (that is all your speakers are to the amplifier); 
Assume that the speaker outputs are marked + (plus) and - (minus). 
Series - if you connect a + to a - which is then further connected to another plus + which is then connected to another minus, this is a series connecton and if doing this with speakers, each load (let's assume 4 ohms) is additive; in other words 4 + 4 + 4 = a 12 ohm load. The current flowing through each load is identical.
Parallel - In this case, all the + are connected together and then to the + on the speaker connection. All of the - are connected and then also to the minus of the speaker output. In this case, all of the current is shared and not necessarily equally; the lowest load impedance (this is a complex combination of resistance, inductance and capacitance) will draw the most current. If you have all 4 ohm loads, they will all draw the same amount of current. If you have a mix of loads, the final result will be lower than the lowest of the loads.
If a graphical representation is better for understanding, go here:
Series & parallel circuits 
In your case, if the output is specified as (for example) 4 ohms and you parallel two 8 ohm speakers, it will be a 'matched load' and safe for the amplifier. If you add a third speaker of 4 ohms, you will have a load well under 4 ohms, below the rating of your amp, and you risk damaging the amplifier if the output is not adequately protected against mismatches.
For your situation, you should look at the math on the Wikipedia link and avoid causing your amp to fail.

Feb 16, 2009 | Onkyo TX-DS777

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio & Video Receivers Logo

Related Topics:

112 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio & Video Receivers Experts

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

68301 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60960 Answers

Are you an Audio and Video Receiver Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...