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I have bought an old B&O beogram rx2 turntable and am having difficulty playing any records. When I press play the needle will sit on the edge of the record but when it moves in to the grooves it seems to slip off back to the beginning. I have never had a record player before so it could simply be because the needle is worn out and it isn't sitting in the grooves properly. Thanks

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If you cannot see a small tip on the needle then yes it is worn out,but you can check by rubbing your finger over the tip when the system is on,if you hear sound through the speakers then it should play the album,make sure that the weight at the back of the arm is set to keep the needle in the groove as this may be set to far back,move it forward to keep weight on the needle.

hope this helps.
CABLE GUY.

Posted on Jul 16, 2008

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4 Answers

I have a Bang&Olufsen Beogram


Similar to most Beogram 1800, the RX 2 featured record sizing by weight. When Play was selected, the centre part of the platter would raise gently, with only just enough force to lift a 45RPM single. An LP would be too heavy to lift, so the mechanism would set itself to 45RPM and 18cm if the record lifted, 33RPM and 30cm if it did not. The speed control keys could then be used to override the choice for non-standard records. The parts could also detect if a record was not present, and prevent the turntable being activated
Just put lp on and it should work

Jul 08, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I have a Technics Double Cassette Deck RS-TR212. On the rear it has Output and Input connections. Output goes off to the Amplifier. Can the Input be used to record or play from a record Turntable? I have...


your receiver has (or should have) input and output connections,, your turntable needs to be hooked to the receiver,, then with the output cables that feed your cassette player you need to go, in to out and out to in ( receiver output to the input of the tape player, and out of the tape player to the in on the receiver, while playing a record if you hit record on the tape player it will record the record, depending on the receiver it will show you the meter readings for either the in or out,, they vary

Apr 11, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I expected that the RCA leads from my turntable would just plug into the back of the RCD-W500C, but the manual indicates a somewhat complex cabling arrangement through the amplifier. I have not been able...


Your new cd player/recorder is a "component piece" as is your turntable,cassette player, reel to reel or CD player. Connect it as you would any other component piece of stereo equipment. Set up your recorder to "record" in real time(not high speed or synch record). Your tape recorder records anything that is playing through your reciever to your speakers. So, treat your "CD" recorder as you would a "CASSETTE TAPE" recorder. Play your vinyl record on your turntable and record to CD on your CD recorder ! Pay special attention to the dubbing speed, you will not use "synch or high speed !! Good Luck

Feb 26, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Does this recorder have its own amplifier?


Sure, the tape will play.

Copying tapes does not require an external amp, but LISTENING to them might. The A-4010 has a headphone jack so you're good to go with headphones alone if necessary.

To record, Connect the Output from the new deck to any Line Level Input on your recording device - (NOT PHONO).

If you can, set your record levels up in advance being careful not to have them too high if you're going digital as overloads are not handled well.

As with any old, rare or prized open-reel recording, avoid excessive transport handling of the tape, especially rewinding at high speed. Get yourself some Q-tips and isopropyl alcohol and clean the deck carefully, especially the capstan and idler wheel. Cheat the two tension levers manually and press Play. The capstan will engage the rubber idler. Clean the roller first with a moist Q-tip, being careful not to get strands caught up in the capstan (I'd hold the Q-tip around the 3-o'clock position on the idler), until you get nothing but a little black from it on a clean moist Q-tip. Then press Pause and the roller will retract but the capstan will still spin. Clean it with a fresh wet Q-tip until it is shiny and no more color comes off it.

Handle the reel without placing any inward pressure on the flanges as edge damage can occur.

Make your best stab at a transfer in as few tries as possible as the tape oxide and base are very old and will not tolerate repeated playbacks. Run the tape completely in one direction, flip it over, CLEAN THE DECK AGAIN, and play it back in the other direction (avoiding REWIND as it places a lot of stress on the tape and will probably leave the tape wound unevenly with edges sticking out all over the place. A normal speed playback should wrap the tape nice and tight and even for storage. Avoid exposing the tape to high humidity, dust or heat.

If you have access to a CD Recorder, I recommend making a full resolution Master copy on it and using the digital copy for any subsequent copying, ripping, editting, etc. Archive the original tape and make a digital copy of your end results, too. Good luck.

I'll make this offer to you. If you get it digitized and onto a CD I can probably reprocess it to clean up tape hiss and other problems inherent in 70's-era taping. Analog tape recording was my passion and still is, but I save everything digitally now.

Apr 26, 2009 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Pioneer PL-670 record rejects continually


Are the record size tabs sticking up through the turntable platter cover? They sense the size of the record being played and adjust the run out distance for either 45 or 33 rpm records.

Jan 04, 2009 | Audio & Video Receivers

2 Answers

I just hooked up my old amplifier to my turntable and started playing some vinyl. I'm getting an incredibly annoying static sound through the headphones I'm listening through, and I'm positive it's not the...


Make sure the ground wire from the turntable (they all have one) is grounded to the amp, also the turntable has to be connected to the phono input on the amp. Turntable cant connect to cd or aux. Only phono. Also check to see if there is dust and dirt built up on the needle. clean if needed. most likely a grounding issue

Dec 05, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

2 Answers

My turn table is and old one my needle is broken would i beable to get a new arm for it


With a model number and the brand of your turntable I could probably find what you need with that information. Without that information there is no way to find the right parts.

I have been fixing turntables for over 17 years and have only needed to replace the arm on 2 or 3 of them in that time. It is very unlikely that you would need the arm replaced. The arm is a little more difficult to find for some turntables, but it is not impossible.

Finding the stylus, and/or cartridge with the stylus is not too much of a problem.

Just supply the needed information and I will take care of it for you.


Jun 22, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Yamaha Natural Sound Amp and Tape Player


All of this applies to nearly any analog consumer audio gear...

If you have any Tape Deck and an Equalizer and only the one Tape Monitor loop you should place the EQ into that Tape Monitor loop, then place the Tape Deck onto one of the probable two Tape Monitors on the EQ as it sounds like you had here...

"When I had it set up with the graphic equaliser,pressing tape monitor on the amp and on the equaliser gave me play backfrom the tape player."
That setup will allow you to apply EQ to any analog source and the tape deck in record or playback mode.

However, if you want to remove the EQ and use the Tape Deck directly on the Tape Monitor just attach the deck's Playback cables to Tape Mon In (Play) and the deck's Record cables to the Tape Mon Out (Rec). Flip the Tape Mon control to hear the tape deck or monitor it while recording.

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NEVER plug anything but a turntable into the Phono. It has a preamp that expects a ver ysmall signal from the cartridge AND it also has a severe RIAA Equalization curve which would result in grossly exaggerated frequency extremes if you managedto get a non-LP source into it. Likewise, turntables without internal electronics mut always use the Phono section of a receiver, preamp or integrated amp to get the boost and EQ they need.

Mar 23, 2008 | Yamaha RX-Z1 Receiver

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