Question about Jl Audio 10W7 Car Subwoofer

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Surround is torn from cone half way around

Where can i get a new surround,or how can i fix it

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  • crackeddome Oct 07, 2008

    Sony ome stereo speaker. 12". My 3 year old stuck her finger through the surround!!!!!!!!!! I still love her. What can I do to repair it? The hole is approx. 1" wide torn from the base of perimeter and in the center. it is attached to the paper woofer it self although, if you were to tug on it it woul;d tear off completly and the ther would be an open hole. what to do?

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You can get a new surrond from e-bay or from JL audio. They run about $300 if you get it through JL audio

Posted on Aug 18, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I have AIWA NSX-RV85. The sub-woofer surround tore leaving just the cone. When I play, The woofer just makes a rattling sound coming out of vibrating cone.Any advise on how to fix my speakers.Thanks


Refit the rubber, you can find itbon eBay, its called reconing actually in this case the cone is the inlybpart wich you dont want to replace... The rattling is beingproducer due to the fact the rubber normally holds the cone ibto positionering over the coils. This rattling is not good can defect your cone. So dont play it roll you got a new rubber fitted!

Nov 08, 2016 | Aiwa Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Fix a torn speaker cone?


If it is a woofer, you would probably fix it quite easy. If the speaker driver is used for both bass and midrange, you have a problem.
Fixing a speaker cone is depending on the material. If it is paper cone, it is very easy by using paper that you glue with wood glue (White water based glue) on to the cones rear side (for estetic reasons).
A midrange or bass/midrange driver is operating in frequencies where the cone starts to break up. Not torn apart, but the break up frequency is the frequency where the inner and outer part of the cone not longer follow each other in the same direction. These properties of a cone determine the sound of the speaker which is that type of speaker drivers "identity". Messing that identity up, you end up with a speaker that does not sound as the original one.
Remember that cross over network used to split up frequency ranges, not only are lowpass, bandpass, and highpass filter, but they also filter irregularities where the speaker driver is not longer providing a linear frequency response (Its characteristic sound).

If the cone is polypropylene, there isn't much glue that bite on that material.

May 02, 2016 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

HOW TO GLUE SPEAKER BACK TO BASKET


It sounds like your speaker surround blew away and separated from the speaker cone and/or housing. I'm in the process of fixing one my speakers by replacing the surround.

Generally, when this happens, you'll want to completely replace the speaker surround (the outer ring that allows the speaker coil and cone to travel in and out, usually made of rubber or foam rubber). This isn't necessarily super difficult, it just takes some time, skill and patience, if you want to avoid messing up the speaker and sound from it.


Inspect and repair your existing speaker:


1) Measure:


a) the diameter of your speaker cone (outer edge of the angled piece that goes inward toward the center coil) and the


b) diameter of the speaker housing (the metal "frame" part the speaker surround glues to, which is usually where the speaker mounting holes are located).


Note
whether the area on the speaker cone where the surround connects to is flat or angled.


2) Ordering: You'll want to purchase the new speaker surround to match the similar material you've already got, as close as possible to the exact dimensions you measured in either flat or angled for mounting to the speaker cone.


SpeakerWorks.com tends to be a bit more expensive than others than can be found online, and they will normally have what you need. Their speaker surround repair kits normally come with instructions, surround, glue and a little brush. I found hunting around can save 50% or more.


3) Gluing: Get yourself some Aleene's Tacky Glue (online or in craft stores), and make sure you don't use too much or too little, applying in a uniform coat on one surface, then applying gentle pressure to get the surfaces to stick, and allow it to dry completely for 24 hours.


IMPORTANT: This can be tricky, so be patient, or you're buying a new speaker. If you don't feel comfortable, take it to be repaired properly.


Typically, you'll want to start gluing the new speaker surround to the outer portion of the speaker cone, either on the underside or inside, as it was with the prior surround. Make sure it's centered, applying just enough glue with a brush to insure it holds and you can still slide everything around slightly into proper position. Gently move the speaker in and out to make sure nothing is rubbing. Allow this to dry for a full 24 hours, and do NOT attempt to glue the surround to the housing until after the cone glue is completely dry.


Now, it's at least 24 hours later, you can do the same thing by applying an even layer of glue to the surround (or onto the frame) to complete the new surround replacement. Apply light pressure to make sure it's centered, again gently moving the speaker in and out to make sure nothing is rubbing. Allow this to dry for 24 hours, just like before.


I know, impatience makes this difficult, but then you don't want to be doing this all over again by trying to move too quickly. Worse yet, you can end up completely destroying your speaker cone.


The nice thing about that tacky glue is is holds well and allows you to position things for a while before it sets. Just remember to allow the proper drying time, which is always way longer than the dry glue you can see.


Remember to defer to a professional repairman if you do not feel comfortable doing these repairs yourself.

I hope this helps!

Feb 16, 2012 | Kicker S15L7 Car Subwoofer

1 Answer

Active driver Has a torn rubber surround. I was surprised that sunfire neither services or provides parts for this $2500 subwoofer. Truly unbelievable. I've searched high and low for a solution. Does...


phone an electronics parts provider in your area and ask who re -cones speakers.There are usually a few that do that in all major areas.A shop like that will be able to repair it by putting a new surround on it.

Dec 30, 2010 | Sunfire True Sub Signature Subwoofer

1 Answer

It is rip in to little piecies


It may not be worth the expense, but if the cone or surround are torn, they can be replaced by a speaker repair shop. I just had a pair of JL 10W6's re-edged (the foam surround around the cone deteriorated after 11 years), and the repair cost $100 for the pair, including parts.

Nov 01, 2010 | Thump TBB102 Car Subwoofer

1 Answer

I just received these speakers and they have static in them. What so you think the problem is? johnniemcknight@comcast.net


There could be many causes.

Bad socket on the computer
Dirty volume control
Dirt in and on the speaker cone
Speaker cone torn slightly
A wireless device that may be too close to them eg cordless phone (I know my cell phone is going to ring before it actually does as I get a signal from my speakers)

I have a can of "electrical contact cleaner" which I use to see if it fixes the first two items.
2nd and third item can only bee seen by opening up the speakers.
for dirt I use an air can for cleaning computers but not too close to the cone.
For a torn cone I replace the speakers.

Last item is pretty ease just move the offending item to a new location.

Aug 31, 2009 | Cyber Acoustics Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

The orange circle around the speaker seems to be dry rotted. But the speaker works fine,except on heavy bass tones. M40 speakers


If these are Cerwin Vega speakers or any other for that matter thay need to be refoamed. See a local speaker repair shop about refoaming. Dont use them till you get them refoamed. It is like the speakers suspension and stops the driver from going to far in its excursion.

Aug 27, 2009 | Electronics - Others

1 Answer

Seals around speakers are broekn and gone!


Hello kagato_morri,

While it's certainly possible to replace the surrounds, whether it's economical to do so is another question. For very high-end speakers, there are often "repair kits" available to replace spiders, cones, surrounds and for some, even the voice coils. But such parts are usually not available for your run-of-the-mill speakers.

If the speakers are otherwise in good condition, and you are willing to spend some time with them, you can use an adhesive foam to construct a new surround. A product called "shoe goo" makes a good permanent bond. It's a super strong rubber cement and will hold up under the stresses of the moving speaker cone.

Hope this helps.

May 23, 2009 | JVC Car Audio & Video

3 Answers

Speaker repair


Contact MMats Pro Audio at 561-842-0600. They can re-cone it for you, or sell you the re-cone kit. If that does not work for you, contact MWA Speaker Parts in Tuscon - 520-647-7193. They can sell you a re-cone kit, or they can direct you to a speaker repair center near you. A third option would be to contact Sundown Audio in Troutman, NC. They may be able to re-cone it for you.

Apr 18, 2009 | Mmats Juggernaut 15'' Car Subwoofer

1 Answer

Jbl subs


One time I had 2 MTX 10" subs that had a rubber surround. I was playing it a little hard and tore the surround pretty much all the way around. I bought some windshield urethane and glued it back together. I got rid of them a little while after that and surprisingly the guy who bought them tell me they still sound great. So the answer is yes and no. Depending on the surround you might be able to get away with it. Make sure that you use something that stays flexible even after setting. Also depending on where the tear is and how big it is, it might not even hurt the sub. I hope I could help.
-Andrew Hawkins

Apr 02, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

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