Question about Dell XPS 200 PC Desktop

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Piggy back power splitter

Hi thanks for super quick response, but there are four or five different power cords/connectors with different shapes and no.s of pins coming out of PSU (motherboard, DVD etc.). Which one should I be trying a find a splitter for? Just need two connectors to give 12v supply

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  • Dellboyz
    Dellboyz Jul 13, 2008

    Hi thanks for super quick response, but there are four or five different power cords/connectors with different shapes and no.s of pins coming out of PSU (motherboard, DVD etc.). Which one should I be trying a find a splitter for? Just need two connectors to give 12v supply.



    I should have pointed out that these are not molex type connectors. So I can't just buy a molex splitter. Part of the problem is that I don't know what these types of power connectors are called, so don't know what to search for.

  • Dellboyz
    Dellboyz Jul 14, 2008

    Thanks Eagle338, but none of the power cables have molex/ide type connectors. I have now decided on a strategy that might be useful to any Dell 200/210 systems out there. I have found a (15-pin) SATA power splitter that plugs into a HDD and then offers two additional SATA power sockets. I have also purchased a SATA/molex adapter to plug into one of these, which means I can now piggy back the Nexus fan onto the HDD power supply. The drag is that you have to purchase two adapters, although they are both very cheap. The upside is that the HDD and its fan effectively share the same power supply cable, so that disconnecting the HDD will automatically disconnect the fan. Now I'll have to get on with some work...

  • Dellboyz
    Dellboyz Jul 14, 2008

    Looking for a pic of a SATA power connector, just found this which would have done the job without the need to buy a second adapter.



  • Dellboyz
    Dellboyz Jul 14, 2008

    Another attempt at pic

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You can connect the splitter to any of the 4 connectors that power IDEs(Hard Disk, DVD ROM, CDROM etc.,). The splitter's sole purpose is to split one 12v supply into two 12V power supplies so that we can connect two devices instead of one. You can disconnect the power from DVD connect the splitter to it and then use one of the two 12v supplies from the splitter to connect to the DVD drive and the other to the HDD fan.


Posted on Jul 13, 2008

  • eagle338
    eagle338 Jul 14, 2008

    can you post a pic of your HDD's power connector. I was not able to understand how can it be different..

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I am going to have to go draw something up real quick for you.
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See this diagram as you read the description below.You will be using this diagram to identify different types of connectors... ignore any voltages or wire descriptions/colors that are there.

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+12v Power Connector
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Power supply light on or flashesPerform the following steps, in order, until power is restored or it is determined that there is a hardware failure: CAUTION: This product contains components that are easily damaged by ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). To reduce the chance of ESD damage, work over a non-carpeted floor, use a static dissipative work surface (like a conductive foam pad), and wear an ESD wrist strap that is connected to a grounded surface, like the metal frame of a PC.
  1. Disconnect everything from the computer, including the power cord.
  2. With the power cord disconnected , press the power button on the front of the computer for five seconds.Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
    NOTE: If the power supply fan makes an inconsistent grinding sound or stops and starts erratically, replace the power supply
  3. With the power cord removed, flip the red voltage selector switch to the opposite position. Wait about five seconds, and then switch the red voltage selector switch back to its original location. Ensure that the voltage selector switch is on the correct setting, 115V for North America.Performing this step ensures that the voltage switch is engaged and set correctly for your country/region. Figure 4: Voltage selector switchc00517964.jpgPlug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
  4. Plug a lamp into the same outlet to see if the wall outlet has power. Try the computer in a different outlet in order to eliminate the outlet as a possible source of the issue. Test both to see if the wall outlets have power.
  5. Remove all extension cords, power strips, surge protectors and any converters that remove ground. Plug the power cable directly to the wall outlet. Test for power. If this fixes the issue, find the device that is causing the issue and do not use it.
    NOTE: If you find the device that was causing the problem was a surge protector, resetting a breaker or fuse on the surge protector may fix the issue.
  6. Remove all attached devices except for keyboard, mouse, and monitor.
  7. Remove any internal component that was recently added, such as video card, memory, CD, DVD, and hard drives. An added device may take more power than the power supply is rated for. If the problem goes away when the component is removed, the only option is to upgrade the power supply to power supply with a higher wattage rating.
  8. Check the power switch:
    1. With the power cord disconnected, press the power button on the front of the PC. The button should release easily and not stick in the socket.
      • If the button sticks, it should be replaced or serviced.
      • If the power button does not stick and appears to be functioning, continue using these steps.
    2. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
    3. Follow the wires from the power button on the front of the computer to their connection on the motherboard.
    4. Look at the power switch cables connected to the motherboard. If the cable has become disconnected, connect the power switch cable connector to the connector on the motherboard. Figure 5: Power switch connector on Motherboardc00517968.jpg
    5. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
  9. Find the defective part:
    1. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
    2. Disconnect all power cable connectors from their connectors on the motherboard and from the back of internal devices (the back of drives). Make sure to label or remember where each cable connects for future reference. Figure 6: Example of common power connectionsc00540428.jpg
    3. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord, and examine the light on the back of the power supply:
      • If the LED is on solid and is not flashing, the power supply is probably good and the problem is most likely caused by a defective component (processor, memory, PCI card) or a defective motherboard. Have the computer serviced, or remove the components and replace them, one at a time, to find and replace the defective component.
      • If the LED is still flashing (it should not flash with all connectors removed), plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED still flashes, the power supply should be replaced.
      • If the LED light is now off, plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED stays off, the power supply should be replaced.

      NOTE: If an electrical storm or power surge has recently occurred, then it is more likely that the power supply, the modem, or motherboard is damaged and requires replacement. If the power supply was damaged due to power outage or storm, this may not be covered under the "act of nature" policy in the warranty statement. Refer to the warranty statement that came with your computer for more information.

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To resolve this issue you may need to open the chassis (the computer cabinet). You can call HP specialized support for help but they charge you for the support. You can call them at 866-211-5207.

OR - Follow the given steps.

Perform the following steps, in order, until power is restored or it is determined that there is a hardware failure: CAUTION: This product contains components that are easily damaged by ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). To reduce the chance of ESD damage, work over a non-carpeted floor, use a static dissipative work surface (like a conductive foam pad), and wear an ESD wrist strap that is connected to a grounded surface, like the metal frame of a PC.
  1. Disconnect everything from the computer, including the power cord.
  2. With the power cord disconnected , press the power button on the front of the computer for five seconds. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps. NOTE: If the power supply fan makes an inconsistent grinding sound or stops and starts erratically, replace the power supply
  3. With the power cord removed, flip the red voltage selector switch to the opposite position. Wait about five seconds, and then switch the red voltage selector switch back to its original location. Ensure that the voltage selector switch is on the correct setting, 115V for North America. Performing this step ensures that the voltage switch is engaged and set correctly for your country/region. Figure 4: Voltage selector switchc00517964.jpg Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
  4. Plug a lamp into the same outlet to see if the wall outlet has power. Try the computer in a different outlet in order to eliminate the outlet as a possible source of the issue. Test both to see if the wall outlets have power.
  5. Remove all extension cords, power strips, surge protectors and any converters that remove ground. Plug the power cable directly to the wall outlet. Test for power. If this fixes the issue, find the device that is causing the issue and do not use it. NOTE: If you find the device that was causing the problem was a surge protector, resetting a breaker or fuse on the surge protector may fix the issue.
  6. Remove all attached devices except for keyboard, mouse, and monitor.
  7. Remove any internal component that was recently added, such as video card, memory, CD, DVD, and hard drives. An added device may take more power than the power supply is rated for. If the problem goes away when the component is removed, the only option is to upgrade the power supply to power supply with a higher wattage rating.
  8. Check the power switch:
    1. With the power cord disconnected, press the power button on the front of the PC. The button should release easily and not stick in the socket.
      • If the button sticks, it should be replaced or serviced.
      • If the power button does not stick and appears to be functioning, continue using these steps.
    2. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
    3. Follow the wires from the power button on the front of the computer to their connection on the motherboard.
    4. Look at the power switch cables connected to the motherboard. If the cable has become disconnected, connect the power switch cable connector to the connector on the motherboard. Figure 5: Power switch connector on Motherboardc00517968.jpg
    5. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
  9. Find the defective part:
    1. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
    2. Disconnect all power cable connectors from their connectors on the motherboard and from the back of internal devices (the back of drives). Make sure to label or remember where each cable connects for future reference. Figure 6: Example of common power connectionsc00540428.jpg
    3. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord, and examine the light on the back of the power supply:
      • If the LED is on solid and is not flashing, the power supply is probably good and the problem is most likely caused by a defective component (processor, memory, PCI card) or a defective motherboard. Have the computer serviced, or remove the components and replace them, one at a time, to find and replace the defective component.
      • If the LED is still flashing (it should not flash with all connectors removed), plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED still flashes, the power supply should be replaced.
      • If the LED light is now off, plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED stays off, the power supply should be replaced.
      NOTE: If an electrical storm or power surge has recently occurred, then it is more likely that the power supply, the modem, or motherboard is damaged and requires replacement.

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1 Answer

Fast green blink


Perform the following steps, in order, until power is restored or it is determined that there is a hardware failure:

1.Disconnect everything from the computer, including the power cord.
2.With the power cord disconnected , press the power button on the front of the computer for five seconds. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
NOTE: If the power supply fan makes an inconsistent grinding sound or stops and starts erratically, replace the power supply

3. With the power cord removed, flip the red voltage selector switch to the opposite position. Wait about five seconds, and then switch the red voltage selector switch back to its original location. Ensure that the voltage selector switch is on the correct setting, 115V for North America.
Performing this step ensures that the voltage switch is engaged and set correctly for your country/region.

4. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
5. Plug a lamp into the same outlet to see if the wall outlet has power. Try the computer in a different outlet in order to eliminate the outlet as a possible source of the issue. Test both to see if the wall outlets have power.
6. Remove all extension cords, power strips, surge protectors and any converters that remove ground. Plug the power cable directly to the wall outlet. Test for power. If this fixes the issue, find the device that is causing the issue and do not use it.
NOTE: If you find the device that was causing the problem was a surge protector, resetting a breaker or fuse on the surge protector may fix the issue.
8. Remove all attached devices except for keyboard, mouse, and monitor.
9. Remove any internal component that was recently added, such as video card, memory, CD, DVD, and hard drives. An added device may take more power than the power supply is rated for. If the problem goes away when the component is removed, the only option is to upgrade the power supply to power supply with a higher wattage rating.
10. Check the power switch:
a. With the power cord disconnected, press the power button on the front of the PC. The button should release easily and not stick in the socket.
  • If the button sticks, it should be replaced or serviced.
  • If the power button does not stick and appears to be functioning, continue using these steps.
11. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
  • Follow the wires from the power button on the front of the computer to their connection on the motherboard.
  • Look at the power switch cables connected to the motherboard. If the cable has become disconnected, connect the power switch cable connector to the connector on the motherboard.
  • Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
12. Find the defective part:
  • With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
  • Disconnect all power cable connectors from their connectors on the motherboard and from the back of internal devices (the back of drives). Make sure to label or remember where each cable connects for future reference.
  • Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord, and examine the light on the back of the power supply:

13. If the LED is on solid and is not flashing, the power supply is probably good and the problem is most likely caused by a defective component (processor, memory, PCI card) or a defective motherboard. Have the computer serviced, or remove the components and replace them, one at a time, to find and replace the defective component.

14. If the LED is still flashing (it should not flash with all connectors removed), plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED still flashes, the power supply should be replaced.

15. If the LED light is now off, plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED stays off, the power supply should be replaced.

NOTE: If an electrical storm or power surge has recently occurred, then it is more likely that the power supply, the modem, or motherboard is damaged and requires replacement.

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1 Answer

Want safe way to piggy back a power supply for XPS 210


The simplest way to solve this will be to get a power splitter. You should get one for around 2$. It will have a connector and two plugs(used to split the power supply into two.)

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1 Answer

CPU doesn't turn on!!


    • Power supply light on or flashes Perform the following steps, in order, until power is restored or it is determined that there is a hardware failure: CAUTION: This product contains components that are easily damaged by ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). To reduce the chance of ESD damage, work over a non-carpeted floor, use a static dissipative work surface (like a conductive foam pad), and wear an ESD wrist strap that is connected to a grounded surface, like the metal frame of a PC.
      1. Disconnect everything from the computer, including the power cord.
      2. With the power cord disconnected , press the power button on the front of the computer for five seconds. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps. NOTE: If the power supply fan makes an inconsistent grinding sound or stops and starts erratically, replace the power supply
      3. With the power cord removed, flip the red voltage selector switch to the opposite position. Wait about five seconds, and then switch the red voltage selector switch back to its original location. Ensure that the voltage selector switch is on the correct setting, 115V for North America. Performing this step ensures that the voltage switch is engaged and set correctly for your country/region. Figure 4: Voltage selector switch c00517964.jpg Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
      4. Plug a lamp into the same outlet to see if the wall outlet has power. Try the computer in a different outlet in order to eliminate the outlet as a possible source of the issue. Test both to see if the wall outlets have power.
      5. Remove all extension cords, power strips, surge protectors and any converters that remove ground. Plug the power cable directly to the wall outlet. Test for power. If this fixes the issue, find the device that is causing the issue and do not use it. NOTE: If you find the device that was causing the problem was a surge protector, resetting a breaker or fuse on the surge protector may fix the issue.
      6. Remove all attached devices except for keyboard, mouse, and monitor.
      7. Remove any internal component that was recently added, such as video card, memory, CD, DVD, and hard drives. An added device may take more power than the power supply is rated for. If the problem goes away when the component is removed, the only option is to upgrade the power supply to power supply with a higher wattage rating.
      8. Check the power switch:
        1. With the power cord disconnected, press the power button on the front of the PC. The button should release easily and not stick in the socket.
          • If the button sticks, it should be replaced or serviced.
          • If the power button does not stick and appears to be functioning, continue using these steps.
        2. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
        3. Follow the wires from the power button on the front of the computer to their connection on the motherboard.
        4. Look at the power switch cables connected to the motherboard. If the cable has become disconnected, connect the power switch cable connector to the connector on the motherboard. Figure 5: Power switch connector on Motherboard c00517968.jpg
        5. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
      9. Find the defective part:
        1. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.
        2. Disconnect all power cable connectors from their connectors on the motherboard and from the back of internal devices (the back of drives). Make sure to label or remember where each cable connects for future reference. Figure 6: Example of common power connections c00540428.jpg
        3. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord, and examine the light on the back of the power supply:
          • If the LED is on solid and is not flashing, the power supply is probably good and the problem is most likely caused by a defective component (processor, memory, PCI card) or a defective motherboard. Have the computer serviced, or remove the components and replace them, one at a time, to find and replace the defective component.
          • If the LED is still flashing (it should not flash with all connectors removed), plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED still flashes, the power supply should be replaced.
          • If the LED light is now off, plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED stays off, the power supply should be replaced.
          NOTE: If an electrical storm or power surge has recently occurred, then it is more likely that the power supply, the modem, or motherboard is damaged and requires replacement. If the power supply was damaged due to power outage or storm, this may not be covered under the "act of nature" policy in the warranty statement. Refer to the warranty statement that came with your computer for more information.

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