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In Scene, exactly how does the camera function in the various settings? (LENS OPENING, SHUTTER SPEED, FOCUS, ETC)

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Be honest with you, the scene mode is design for those who are not interested in knowing all that aperture, shutter speed etc. If you want to know the settings, all makes have different setting for different scenes according to their designs on productions.

If you are interest in these aperture things/skills, explore yourself with the equipment you have to achieve the desired picture composition. Same settings on two different camers may have different outcomes, as their lens design may not be exactly the same. Remember, EXPLORE!

Posted on Jul 12, 2008

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How to set Shuttler Speed


As with most point&shoot cameras, the M753 doesn't give you much direct control over the camera. It expects you to just point the camera and shoot. You can "suggest" to the camera that it use a fast shutter speed by setting it to the Sports scene mode, or that it use a slow shutter speed by setting it the Landscape scene mode (though the latter would also set the focus to infinity).

Jan 18, 2013 | Kodak Easyshare M753 Digital Camera

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Manual that came with camera does not explain symbols for setting the mode. Amazing! What do M, A,S,P, N and SP 1 and SP2 stand for? the only things I understand are Auto and Panorama.


M stands for 'Manual mode'. This is the mode wherein you set your shutter speed and aperture setting. A stands for 'Aperture Priority'. This is the mode where you set the aperture or opening of the lens and the camera sets the shutter speed. The lower the aperture number setting, the more light penetrates the lens, a faster shutter speed is needed. This setting is usually used for portrait scenarios. S stands for 'Shutter priority'. This is the mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera sets the aperture. The higher shutter speed number, the lower aperture number is set by the camera to accommodate more light into the lens. This setting is usually used for capturing moving objects like cars. P stands for 'Program Mode'. The camera takes care of different settings except for the aperture and the shutter speed. You get to choose combinations of aperture and shutter speed settings that will not change the exposure of your scene. This is like a combined 'A' and 'S' mode with different combinations. N stands for 'Natural Light'. The camera tries to make use of available light. This is ideal for indoor use when flash is prohibited or when you just want to capture the ambiance of the scene. The camera sets a high sensitivity setting to handle low light conditions. The drawback of this would be grainier pictures. SP1 and SP2 stand for Scene Position 1 and 2. This is like a memory setting for most commonly used scene settings. For example, you can assign SP1 for landscape mode scene and SP2 for night mode scene. You have 13 scenes to choose from in your camera, 2 of which you can assign in SP1 or SP2. The default setting for SP1 is Portrait mode and for SP2, it is Landscape mode.
Hope this helps.

Apr 15, 2011 | Fuji FinePix S1000FD Digital Camera

1 Answer

For use on a non-Hasselblad camera, can I use the aperture preview button (which locks) to set aperture?


There is no communications between the camera and lens. When using a set up like this everything becomes manual and you must remember to stop down the aperture to your taking aperture before releasing the shutter. I don't know what camera or format you are going to use this lens with but assuming it is a digital "bridge" (a camera that is between an amateur and a pro) or a professional the sequence would be the same.
To view, focus and compose the lens would be set in this case F2, to select the correct light meter reading the lens is set (stopped) down to the taking aperture. The modes I've used for this have been mostly manual but lately I found that "AV" worked equally well and the camera metered to the proper exposure. Most times the camera was mounted on a tripod and the shutter was released with a electronic shutter release.
Sequence for taking a photo for me anyway was/is (with the camera mounted on a tripod) focus, compose, stop down to taking aperture, check metering and release the shutter if in AV mode or manual mode to set the shutter speed and release the shutter.
You will find that all makes of digital cameras will function differently so what sequence works for one won't work on others. This meaning I have had digital cameras that wouldn't meter through anything other then the lenses meant specifically for them.
Problems that I've had. Forgetting to stop down to taking aperture (like Duh), not fine focusing (manual), not trusting the in focus indicator, forgetting that the viewfinder is/was only 94% of the scene. Once a little time has been spent with a lens set up like this the rewards are far beyond the trivial annoyances. Have fun with it

Jan 12, 2011 | Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

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How i take photo in night ! my problem is for clearity


I have a sample image here, I'm not sure how it will load it's a crop from a full frame.
I've read into your camera specifications and have found that 15 seconds is the longest shutter speed you can use, I didn't find a "Bulb" for shutter speed and this will limit your abilities to make clear "clarity" night photographs to work within the 15 seconds you will need to increase the ISO, increasing the ISO will introduce a grain effect and the clarity will fall off.
I'll give you a starting point some things you won't like what I'm saying but I've been doing this since 1983. You will need a sturdy tripod. Shut the IS off. See if you can focus on your subject and compose. If you can't auto focus (lack of light or contrast) switch to manual focus, focus is critical if you can't obtain this the shot will be useless. After focus compose your scene set your camera at ISO 100, manual mode F11 adjust the shutter speed to give proper exposure increase ISO by one stop and decrease F stop by one (F8) check exposure once you have the exposure recompose your scene. Make sure the camera is in manual focus, IS (image stabilization) is off, set self timer to 2 second delay, check your scene again and release the shutter and don't touch the camera again until the exposure is complete. There is a whole lot more to this and you are limited because of the lack of the bulb feature or a shutter speed greater then 15 seconds.
Sample image
tri3mast_116.jpg

Jan 07, 2011 | Canon PowerShot SX30 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Fujifil FinePix S6500fd: How to focus the subject(blur the background)? Like this: http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs604.ash2/155662_1475615262462_1596139557_31044751_765416_n.jpg


What you are asking about is called depth of field. Boiled down, it means that there is a certain amount of area in an image that is in focus, given the focal length of the lens, the aperture (size of the shutter opening) and some other factors. There's a lot of theory behind it, but you just want to know how to accomplish that creative blur behind the subject, right?

If your camera has the capability to choose the aperture, known as the f-stop, either with a manual mode or an aperture-priority mode, then this is pretty easy. The larger the aperture (size of shutter opening) the smaller the depth of field, which means only a small area is in focus. The aperture, or f-stop, is denoted with numbers like F/2.8 or F/8, etc. The lower the number, the bigger the aperture and the more background blur you will get. There is an inverse relation ship between shutter opening and speed, too. A big opening like F2.8 means a faster shutter speed, versus a small opening like F/22. Every lens is different, so your aperture options will vary.

If your camera does not allow you to choose the aperture, it may still have a "scene" setting you can use. A "portrait" or "night" setting usually has a bigger aperture than, say, a "landscape" setting.

Other factors also contribute to creating background blur. All else being equal, the blur increases as you move closer to the subject or as you zoom in on the subject with a zoom lens. Also, having greater space between the background and your subject increases blur.

So, to maximize background blur and create a shallow depth of field, you want to pick the largest aperture possible (smallest f-stop number), you want to get close to the subject and extend your zoom as much as you can, and you want to maximize the distance between the subject and the start of any background objects. Your success will depend in part on your camera and lenses.

If all else fails, you can also artificially create the background blur in software after the image is taken, but that's another story!

Dec 16, 2010 | Fuji Cameras

1 Answer

I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My pictures are blurry


It could be several things.
  1. What is the ISO and shutter set on? Low ISO and moderate light will force the shutter to go slower. Any shutter speed less than 60 will be blurry, getting blurrier and blurrier as the number goes down. You could try raising the ISO to get he shutter above 125 and see if that helps.
  2. It could be that the lens is too strong for the shutter speed being used. Generally make sure the shutter speed is at least the same or higher than the largest focal length of the lens. Example: A 70-300 lens should be used with a shutter speed of at least 300, but higher like 500 or 1000 would be better.
  3. Make sure you are holding the camera correctly, with both hands supporting the camera, you elbows tucked close you your body, your left hand supporting the full weight of the cameras, your right hand working the controls. Make sure you are squeezing the shutter button lightly and slowly, no punching ig or stabbing at it. This fast jerky movement can cause blur up to very high shutter speeds if you are not careful.
  4. Make sure the lens is functioning properly, that the m/a switch on the slide of the camera/and or lens is set to A for auto focus.
  5. Make sure the Auto focus sensor is set fo the broadest largest setting or that the focus sensor is set for where you want it not off the the side.

Nov 27, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I have a digital canon rebel xt with several lenses. I just purchase a tamron 70-200 1:2.8 lens and want to know the correct setting to take footbal pictures at night from the sidelines. I get perfect...


Light up the scene! Even pro lens would have trouble taking pictures at night. Pro shoot in highly lighted stadium with 10 000$ lens with tripod or monopod. Tamron sells entry level lens, stop searching a trick, you wont find any other than lenlighting the scene!

Aug 28, 2009 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a Panasonic Lumix DMC FX07. My photos are blurry 90% of the time. What are the best settings to put in on to get the best quality?


I have looked around, and it appears that there are others with the same problem, with that same model. Either the camera has an issue, or there are picky settings on the camera.

Start with the obvious. Make sure the lens is very clean. Use lens tissue, or a very soft, lint free cloth. Try that first and see if there is any difference.

When you are taking pictures, take advantage of focus lock. You center the subject you are focusing on, then push down the shutter button half way. Then while holding it half way, you can reposition the camera and take the picture. The focus will lock on whatever you first clicked on. It works really cool.

Make sure the stabalizer is turned on, the little hand with lines around it, like shake.. Make sure that is on 1 or 2 mode and not turned off. Try all three and experiment with that.

Lastly, make sure you use your scene modes. Moving subjects need the sports mode, people portrait mode, etc. That adjusts the shutter speed and lens opening for the right type of photo.

If you have Adobe Reader, here is a link to your manual, you can download it to your computer.

http://www.olympusamerica.com/files/Stylus740_750InstructionManual.pdf

I hope this helps!

Paul

Apr 17, 2009 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX07T Digital Camera

1 Answer

The best situation to use each of the shooting modes


The shooting modes are described as follows: AUTO (Factory default setting) Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. SCENE Scene mode enables you to select one of the following scene shooting modes available in the menu. Landscape + Scene shooting Landscape + Scene shooting is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. This mode produces clear, sharp pictures with excellent detail, making it ideal for shooting natural scenery. Landscape + Portrait shooting Landscape + Portrait shooting is suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings QuickTime Movie Quicktime Movie mode lets you record movies. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. My Mode Enables you to make settings manually and register them in the mode dial's mode so you can call up your own shooting mode whenever you want. Program shooting (P) Program shooting allows you to shoot using an aperture and shutter speed that the camera sets. You can set the flash, white balance, or other functions manually. Aperture priority shooting (A) Aperture priority shooting allows you to set the aperture manually. The camera sets the shutter speed automatically. By decreasing the aperture value (F-number), the camera will focus within a smaller range, producing a picture with a blurred background. Increasing the value will let the camera focus over a wider range in the forward and backward directions, resulting in a picture in which

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

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