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Kenmore dryer model 101.63032101

Moisture sensing cycle hasn't worked for quite awhile and now the unit runs but no heat on any setting. Checked breaker and plug outlet

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Based on the information provided above, I am unable to provide a positive solution to your issue. I have provided some common solutions to help guide you in your search.
I am unable to find any information concerning the moisture sensor cycle due to incomplete information.



This link, http://www.repairclinic.com/SmartSearch/SmartSearch.aspx, provides exploded view imagery, belt routing diagrams, parts imagery and function, parts ordering and shipping information, error code details, just about anything you need to get your appliance up and running again. Just follow the links to navigate through the site.

You will need to enter the model number stamped on the manufacturers product information data tag, located on the unit, and not in the User’s Manual. to access your product information.


Clicking on the underlined links will take you directly to that page.


Note: A volt-ohm meter is beneficial in performing electrical tests.

If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:

Power from the house
Heating element
Thermal fuse
Wiring
Power from the house Check to see whether there's power getting to the dryer. Is it plugged in? Check for blown fuses or tripped circuit breakers--your dryer uses two fuses or circuit breakers. The dryer could tumble but not heat if only one of the two fuses is blown. If you have circuit breakers, one of the two circuit breakers can trip, even if the two for the dryer are connected.

Heating element Often a dryer heating element burns out, but doesn't trip the circuit breaker or blow a fuse. The heating element is simply a long coil of special wire. You can check it for continuity with an ohm meter. No continuity means the element is bad and you need to replace it--electric heating elements aren't repairable.

Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse--which is about an inch long--is usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing. If the fuse has blown, you need to replace it. (You can't re-set it.)

Wiring A common problem is for the main wiring connection from the house, at the dryer, to burn and break its connection. Because the dryer can still tumble with partial power, the connection may be only partially defective. You may need to replace both the power cord to the dryer and the terminal block inside the dryer that the wire is attached to.
If my assistance helped resolve this issue, please show your appreciation by rating how effective my advice was in resolving this issue.
Thank you,
Dave E. (Illeagle)

"Your satisfaction is my personal reward"

Posted on Jul 11, 2008

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1 Answer

Auto cycle does not work timed cycle works fine


In some dryer's the control panel relies on a thermistor rather than a CYCLING thermostat to regulate the drum's air temperature by monitoring the component's resistance changes; resistance goes down as temperature increases and up when temperature decreases. Once the drum's air temperature reaches a certain level required to dry clothes, the control panel shuts off the heater. The panel will turn the heater on again and begin another heating cycle when the thermistor indicates that more heat is needed to keep the air temperature constant inside the drum

Lastly check your moister sensor. ( located inside the dryer door usually) Especially if machine seems to shut down early and clothes are still wet.
Test with a meter at room temperature and it should show continuity.
A failed moisture sensor will affect the dryer run time in the automatic moisture sensing cycle but it will not affect the heating of the dryer or the timed cycle. Which are reflected by the thermostats.

Read more :http://www.ehow.com/info_12203962_check-dryer-thermistor.html

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1 Answer

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In some dryer's the control panel relies on a thermistor rather than a CYCLING thermostat to regulate the drum's air temperature by monitoring the component's resistance changes; resistance goes down as temperature increases and up when temperature decreases. Once the drum's air temperature reaches a certain level required to dry clothes, the control panel shuts off the heater. The panel will turn the heater on again and begin another heating cycle when the thermistor indicates that more heat is needed to keep the air temperature constant inside the drum

Lastly check your moister sensor. ( located inside the dryer door usually) Especially if machine seems to shut down early and clothes are still wet.
Test with a meter at room temperature and it should show continuity.
A failed moisture sensor will affect the dryer run time in the automatic moisture sensing cycle but it will not affect the heating of the dryer or the timed cycle. Which are reflected by the thermostats.

Read more :http://www.ehow.com/info_12203962_check-dryer-thermistor.html

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1 Answer

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Make sure the small orange wire is connected to the 250 limit at the base of the heater assy. That is what powers the motor on auto cycle.

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Kenmore dryer 110.86864100 - Where is the moisture sensor?


Ain't no moisture sensor. This is is not an electronic sensing machine. It uses another method to determine dryness. An orange wire connects to the base of the heating element. The timer motor is driven by power from it in auto dry. The timer motor is VERY slow. Slower than most dryer timer motors.As the clothes get dryer the heat is not needed so the element is turned off by the control thermostat which is mounted next to the skinny white fuse on the blower housing. This allows for the turtle like motor on the timer to advance. Once the clothes get to the point of dryness the heater stays off way longer and the timer motor advances on over to the cool down and carry on over to the end of cycle. So the clothes won't always be dry due to factors like lint buildup in the blower housing, venting to outside and so forth. having said that my mom bought a brand new Kenmore dryer and I set it on 55 minutes timed drying. At the end of that them clothes is still damp. I then set it to auto dry high heat and that usually gets em dry. I think the main probo with this dryer is the thermostat ain't set as high as older models to keep the heat at a moderate temp so that the limits won't blow on models in apts and such. Just a theory.

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My kenmore dryer heat element goes on and off. The clothes take hours to dry.


It seems to run forever If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system. Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle: The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees. When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.) The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again. This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But…if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.

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Dryer will not turn off


If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.

Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:

  • The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.

  • When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)

  • The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.

This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But…if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.

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1 Answer

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If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.

Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:

  • The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.

  • When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)

  • The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.

This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But…if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.

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1 Answer

Takes too long to dry or keeps running when clothes are dry


If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.

Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:

  • The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.

  • When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)

  • The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.

This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But…if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.

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1 Answer

My Kenmore Model# 110 66652500


See the following hints from Repairclinic:

If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.

Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:

  • The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.


  • When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)


  • The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.


This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But…if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.


If it does not heat up, the element can also be faulty.

If you need to call a technician there is a phone number listed at the end of the user manual.

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