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Water heater won't light. Replaced the Thermocouple and when I light the pilot light it turns off when I turn the gas valve to On

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You will need to replace the gas valve

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

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Pilot light keeps going out when we turn heater down, not sure why and what numbers selection means, please help


You didn't mention what type of heater it is. If it is a gas heater then the problem is most likely the thermocouple. This is because there must be a standing flame that keeps the end of thermocouple hot which in turn lets the gas valve stay on and that lets the gas to the burners.

Good luck,

Marty

May 06, 2014 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

BASEMENT FLOODED NOW THE WATER TANK WON'T LIGHT WHAT CAN BE THE PROBLEM


Thermocouple could be corroded not allowing the millivoltage needed to keep the pilot valve open on your gas valve.( Change Thermocouple) Also could have air in the gas line from not being used for a period of time. ( Bleed Gas Line until air is removed) These fixes should only be performed by people competent in the operations of a water heater. Dangerous results can happen if not done right like carbon monoxide poisoning, fire, etc.

Jul 05, 2011 | GE Air Conditioners

3 Answers

I have a Whirlpool gas hot water heater. The pilot light will not stay lit: it ignites but as soon as I release the RESET button, the pilot goes out.


change your thermocouple. You can get one at any hardware store. the thermocouple is the small rod looking device next to the flame of the pilot light. It has a copper looking line about as round as a pencil lead that connects to the gas valve. Disconnect the line from the thermocouple from the gas valve and you may be able to just pull it out from the pilot assembly. take the old one in to the hardware store so you'll get the right length.

Apr 09, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I replaced the gasvalve and thermalpile in my 35,BTU wall heater I light the pilot and turn the heat on it goes out I ran a new state wire in case of a short but it still does it, did I get a bad...


Did you get the right gas valve for a thermapile and not a 24 volt gas valve? Also I would recheck my wiring.... Here is a article that may be of HELP....... Hope this Helps.....
Thermocouple: A thermocouple is a device made of two different metals which creates a small electrical charge when heated at one end.
Thermopile: A thermopile is a probe that contains multiple thermocouples, therefore it can produce a larger electrical current. Millivolts: 1/1000 of a volt - thermocouples and thermopiles typically produce from 25 to 600 millivolts of power.
Piezio - a spark producing device often used to ignite gas pilots and burners.
Gas Valves Types:
A. Single Thermocouple Only - Used on some gas logs
B. Valves with Thermocouples and Thermopiles - Used on most hearth appliances and gas logs with switches or remote controls or thermostats.
C. ODS Systems - Used on Mostly Vent-Free. Available in manual control or thermostat/remote/switch (combination) valves.
valvepict.jpg
Typical Gas Valve A. Thermocouple-Only
Found in: Most gas log sets with standard safety pilot knob control. Also found in certain gas space heaters and construction-site portable heaters.
Explanation: This type of gas valve used a single thermocouple. A thermocouple is a device made of two different metals which creates a small electrical charge when heated at one end by the gas pilot. This small charge causes an electromagnet inside the gas valve to open and allow gas to flow to the main burners. Since the thermocouple must be heated before the burner will start, gas appliances often have a startup mode, during which a knob must be depressed and held for 30 seconds or so after lighting the pilot. At the end of the 30 seconds, the pilot should be generating enough electricity for the valve to operate correctly. At this time, the startup knob can be released and the valve turned to an "on" position for appliance operation.
pilotclose.gif Troubleshooting:
Most problems with this type of valve are due to thermocouple problems. Check the following:
1. Connection from the thermocouple to the valve. Clean the threads of the connecting nut with a pencil eraser and re-tighten.
2. Pilot hood and flame direction. The pilot should engulf the top 5/8" of the thermocouple with a decent flame. If the flame hits the thermocouple too low, this can cause the appliance to go out or not generate enough millivolts for valve operation. The pilot hood and orifice should also be clean from soot which could slow or block the pilot flame.
3. Pilot pressure. Many of these valves have an adjustment screw to adjust the pilot flame. A pilot that is too short may allow the pilot to stay lit after ignition, but may not create enough charge to allow the burners to ignite.
4. Overheating: If the unit works for a few hours and then shuts down, it's possible the thermocouple has become overheated. Repositioning of the gas valve and/or pilot may be needed to avoid this problem.
Problems with LP units can also be due to a tank that is nearly empty or a bad regulator at the tank.
B. Thermocouple & Thermopile valve
gas1.gif Found in: Most modern VENTED gas stoves, fireplaces and fireplace inserts as well as vented gas log sets with thermostat or remote control.
This valve is similar to the thermocouple only valve, however has a pilot which heats up BOTH a thermocouple and a thermopile. The thermocouple still acts to prove that the pilot flame is on and allows this flame to continue after startup. The thermopile is used to power a second circuit which is used to open the main valve. This second circuit is powerful enough (300-600 millivolts) to allow the use of a thermostat, wall switch or control switch to operate the main valve. Control of the valve is obtained simply by hooking a pair of wires to two terminals located on the valve.
Startup is similar to the thermocouple-only valve. A piezo spark ignition is used to ignite the pilot after the gas knob is turned to the "pilot" position and depressed. Once the pilot is lit, the knob is held in for 30 seconds to "prove" the heat and then released and turned from the "pilot" to the "on" position. The main burner will then respond to the switch, thermostat or remote control.
Troubleshooting
Since there is both a thermocouple and thermopile in this valve type, it is important to isolate where the potential problem may be. If the pilot can be lit and stays on after the knob is released, then the problem is probably with the thermopile side of the valve. Here are the most common problems and solutions.
1. Pilot does not light or stay lit after knob is released - Make certain that the Piezo igniter works by checking for a spark between the igniter tip and the pilot hood. If there is no spark, the piezo may be bad or the piezo wire might be shorting to the appliance chassis. It is also possible that the igniter tip needs to be bent slightly toward the pilot hood so the spark jumps to it.
Check carefully that gas to appliance is on and that the valve is in he correct (pilot) position and fully depressed when lighting.
If pilot ignites but does not stay lit after knob is released, then the problem is with the thermocouple not generating enough voltage to the valve. It may be that the pilot adjustment needs to be turned up, or the thermocouple replaced. Another possibility is that the thermocouple may not be being "bathed" fully by the pilot flame. Check your owners manual for a diagram and description of the proper pilot flame and hood adjustment. It is also possible that there is soot or other blockage in the pilot tube, orifice or hood which is reducing the size of the pilot (and also the voltage of the thermocouple).
2. Pilot stays lit, but appliance will not turn on - There are two common causes for this. It is possible that the thermopile is not producing enough millivolts to power the control circuit. The millivolts can be checked with a simple voltmeter (consult the owners manual for proper setting) and adjusted with the pilot adjustment screw. Improper millivolts will also cause the appliance to shut down in the middle of operation.
Another common problem is loose or poor connections or circuits to your appliance switch, thermostat or remote transceiver. This can be isolated by simply using a small piece of wire to jump the "TP" and "TH" terminals located on these valves. If the appliance turns on when these terminals are jumped, then you can be sure that your problem is not in the appliance itself, but further down the switch circuit. Make certain you have used the suggested gauge of wire and that the length for your control runs does not exceed the specs given in your manual.
3. Other possible problems - include wind or back drafts affecting the pilot flame and checking of "spillage" circuits which may be wired into the valve in most B-Vent units.
If all the above checks out, and your valve is still acting weird (i.e., works some of the time), then you may have a defective gas valve in the appliance. Problems with LP units can also be due to a tank that is nearly empty or a bad regulator at the tank.
C. ODS System
Found in: Unvented (Ventless, Vent free) gas logs, fireplaces and stoves. These systems are available in manual or remote control.
ods.gif ODS stands for "Oxygen Depletion Sensor" , a term which accurately describes this valve type. The valve itself is similar in many ways to the two valve types above...with one exception. The pilot tube is a precision mechanism that creates a very stable flame as long as the room air contains the proper amount of oxygen. If the oxygen level in the room air drops even slightly, the pilot becomes unstable and lifts off of the thermocouple (see diagram) causing the gas valve and appliance to cease operation. This type of valve is very reliable, and there have been very few failures of this system - even with tens of millions in use worldwide.

Mar 02, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I have a gas water heater, 6 years old. The pilot will lite and then the burner lites up, after several seconds the burner goes out. It won't stay lite. The other gas appliances are working. What's...


The Thermocouple, which is part of the ignition system may be loose, where it screws into the gas control valve. Or it needs replacing.

But, first turn the gas off to the water heater, allow the burner compartment to cool off and with a flash light do a visual inspection of the burner chamber. If you see rust or scale in the chamber or on the burner, it will need to be cleaned. You can use a wire brush to clean the burner, making sure you do it carefully and not too aggressively. Use a shop vac with a hose and crevice tool to remove the debris that was created when you cleaned the burner. Be sure to vacuum the burner ports well.

Look for the Thermocouple ... it will be in front of the pilot flame and look like a 2 to 3" long piece of copper. It will have a copper tube running from the bottom of it to the gas control valve. Does the Thermocouple look pitted and worn? Dos it have a hazy film on the tip? If so, use some very fine grit sand paper to polish the Thermocouple. You don't want to sand it, as much polish it. After you have completed that, use a cotton ball dipped in alcohol to wipe off the Thermocouple.

You remember the copper tubing I mentioned that runs from the Thermocouple to the Gas Control Valve? Trace that tuning to the control valve and see if you can loosen the connecting nut to the control valve with your fingers. If you can, it's loose and needs to be retightened. Finger tighten it and with an appropriately sized open end wrench tighten only 1/4 turn more. Turn the gas back on and light the pilot, following the lighting instructions on the water heater. Allow the control knob to remain in the pilot position for at least 1 minute before turning the control knob to ON.

The water in the tank has probably cooled enough that the burner should fire up. If it doesn't turn on the hot water side of faucet, to drain the tank some, so that the burner will fire.

Once it fires, take a stick match, light it then blow it out. Quickly place it next to the opening at the top of the tank where the Exhaust Vent Pipe is connected to the tank. If the vent is drawing properly, it should **** the smoke quickly up the vent pipe. If it doesn't, you'll need to check the vent pipe for obstructions or disconnections at the couplings along the pipe.

If the burner does not continue to operate properly after you have completed all of this. Replace the Thermocouple. Remove the one you now have and take it with you to a hardware or home improvement store, so that you can match it up to the ones that are available.

Hope all this solves your problem. Please let me know.

Feb 12, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I have ventless natural gas heater , u can lit the pilot , but when u let up off the button the pilot goes out . have replaced thermocouple the same problem pilot will not stay lit. have also used air...


When you light the pilot, hold the button in about 1 minute to satisfy the thermocouple. Once the thermocouple is hot and satisfied, turn the gas to "ON". You may have to extend the time a bit, but 1 minute is usually enough.

Best regards, --W/D--

Jan 20, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I WOULD LIKE TO REPLACE MY THERMO CUPPLING


In simplest terms, a thermocouple is a temperature sensor. Normally inexpensive, a thermocouple is standard on hot water tanks. If your thermocouple breaks or you feel it is not working properly, consider replacing it b?p=y23r90wnbq7oglkvtnbuhgyhrktxauzqpeoaddsf&t=18g7grtjm%2fx%3d1290445898%2fe%3d2143440281%2fr%3dacont%2fk%3d5%2fv%3d8.1%2fw%3d0%2fy%3dyahoo%2ff%3d2680761980%2fh%3dcg49imfjb250iibzzxj2zulkpsjzmjnsotb3tkjxn09nbgtwve5ivuhnewhys1r4yvv6cxbfb0fezfngiibzaxrlswq9ijq4mtmwnteiihrtdg1wpsixmjkwndq1odk4ota5njiwiia-%2fq%3d-1%2fs%3d1%2fj%3d6f060d4c&u=13gohjn6b%2fn%3df8a.bkwnpkw-%2fc%3d715481.14405591.14260180.13829426%2fd%3dlrec%2fb%3d6235626%2fv%3d1 lg.php?category_id=6&content_type=article&content_type_id=584031&key_page=1721642411054458764&site_id=1&bannerid=10089&campaignid=2945&zoneid=2&loc=1&referer=http%3a%2f%2fwww.associatedcontent.com%2farticle%2f584031%2fhow_to_change_a_thermocouple_on_your.html%3fcontent_type_id%3d584031&cb=ebe6534afeavw.php?zoneid=2&cb=1721642411054458764&source=&n=a14de4a9&slice=-1060-&dma=-0-&cty=-us-&content_type=article&content_type_id=584031&category_id=6&key_ad=1045292919&site_id=1&ad_pos=2&key_page=1721642411054458764&ac_url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.associatedcontent.com%2farticle%2f584031%2fhow_to_change_a_thermocouple_on_your.html rather than installing a new gas hot water heater.

Begin this project by shutting off the gas control knob on your hot water heater. Once you are sure that the gas is off, you should use a wrench to remove the nut that attaches the thermocouple to the gas hot water tank. This nut should appear to be securing a piece of copper tubing or other type of tubing. With the nut removed, you should also pull down on the tubing, dislodging it from the thermocouple.

Sometimes there is another nut that attaches the end of the thermocouple to the pilot bracket, if this is the case you should unscrew this nut as well. You can slide it down the tubing and keep it there until you need to replace it.

With the nuts that were holding the unit in place removed, you should be able to slide the old thermocouple out of the brackets that hold it to the hot water heater. You should then take it to a hardware or home improvement store and find a suitable replacement. Then follow these steps to install the new part and fix the hot water heater.

To change the thermocouple, you should press the end of the thermocouple into the pilot bracket as far as you can. If you had to remove a second nut to remove the old thermocouple, now is the time to replace that nut securely.

With the thermocouple in place, you should connect the lead to the control unit. Use the nut you removed in the beginning steps to secure the lead. You should then tighten it at least a quarter turn with a wench to make sure the lead is securely attached to the control unit of the gas hot water heater.

Now that the new thermocouple is installed on your gas hot water heater, turn on the gas shut off valve that you turned off earlier. You should be able to relight the pilot and the functionality of your gas hot water heater should be restored.

Dec 06, 2010 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I have old rheem ruud hot water tank. it's down for 4 day's, i would like to get it started, but the thing i would like to find out is can i get it going by lighting it up by using lighter or not. The...


Yes you can light it with a BBQ type lighter (long enough).
If it lights and stays lit then you need to change the thermocouple (looks like a little pipe off gas valve)

In simplest terms, a thermocouple is a temperature sensor. Normally inexpensive, a thermocouple is standard on hot water tanks. If your thermocouple breaks or you feel it is not working properly, consider replacing it b?p=y23r90wnbq7oglkvtnbuhgyhrktxauzqpeoaddsf&t=18g7grtjm%2fx%3d1290445898%2fe%3d2143440281%2fr%3dacont%2fk%3d5%2fv%3d8.1%2fw%3d0%2fy%3dyahoo%2ff%3d2680761980%2fh%3dcg49imfjb250iibzzxj2zulkpsjzmjnsotb3tkjxn09nbgtwve5ivuhnewhys1r4yvv6cxbfb0fezfngiibzaxrlswq9ijq4mtmwnteiihrtdg1wpsixmjkwndq1odk4ota5njiwiia-%2fq%3d-1%2fs%3d1%2fj%3d6f060d4c&u=13gohjn6b%2fn%3df8a.bkwnpkw-%2fc%3d715481.14405591.14260180.13829426%2fd%3dlrec%2fb%3d6235626%2fv%3d1 lg.php?category_id=6&content_type=article&content_type_id=584031&key_page=1721642411054458764&site_id=1&bannerid=10089&campaignid=2945&zoneid=2&loc=1&referer=http%3a%2f%2fwww.associatedcontent.com%2farticle%2f584031%2fhow_to_change_a_thermocouple_on_your.html%3fcontent_type_id%3d584031&cb=ebe6534afe avw.php?zoneid=2&cb=1721642411054458764&source=&n=a14de4a9&slice=-1060-&dma=-0-&cty=-us-&content_type=article&content_type_id=584031&category_id=6&key_ad=1045292919&site_id=1&ad_pos=2&key_page=1721642411054458764&ac_url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.associatedcontent.com%2farticle%2f584031%2fhow_to_change_a_thermocouple_on_your.html rather than installing a new gas hot water heater.

Begin this project by shutting off the gas control knob on your hot water heater. Once you are sure that the gas is off, you should use a wrench to remove the nut that attaches the thermocouple to the gas hot water tank. This nut should appear to be securing a piece of copper tubing or other type of tubing. With the nut removed, you should also pull down on the tubing, dislodging it from the thermocouple.

Sometimes there is another nut that attaches the end of the thermocouple to the pilot bracket, if this is the case you should unscrew this nut as well. You can slide it down the tubing and keep it there until you need to replace it.

With the nuts that were holding the unit in place removed, you should be able to slide the old thermocouple out of the brackets that hold it to the hot water heater. You should then take it to a hardware or home improvement store and find a suitable replacement. Then follow these steps to install the new part and fix the hot water heater.

To change the thermocouple, you should press the end of the thermocouple into the pilot bracket as far as you can. If you had to remove a second nut to remove the old thermocouple, now is the time to replace that nut securely.

With the thermocouple in place, you should connect the lead to the control unit. Use the nut you removed in the beginning steps to secure the lead. You should then tighten it at least a quarter turn with a wench to make sure the lead is securely attached to the control unit of the gas hot water heater.

Now that the new thermocouple is installed on your gas hot water heater, turn on the gas shut off valve that you turned off earlier. You should be able to relight the pilot and the functionality of your gas hot water heater should be restored.

Nov 22, 2010 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

We have a whirlpool hotwater heater model #fg1404t3nv and we can not get the pilot light to stay lit. help please we need hot water and do not have the money to replace it


Fear not, unless you havewater leaking from the tank you won't have to worry with replacing it.

Heres how your heaters ignition system works.

The Pilot is lit, and the flame sensor detects flame and sends signal to the gas valve.The gas valve then sends gas to the burners and the burnes ignite.

If the gas valve does not recieve signal from the sensor it will not come on and it will shut off all gas to the pilot, and burners to prevent raw gas from dumping into your home.

If your system has a thermocouple, 99% change the problem is the thermocouple.

When I service a customers unit, I automatically replace the thermocouple because they are so notoirus for going bad.

You can buy one at Lowes for less than 10 bucks.

To locate the thermocouple, go to the gas valve, fint the small copper tube (about as thick as a pencil lead) and follow it to the pilot. The sensor will be slightly larger in diameter and about 2 to 3 inches long.

You can try cleaning the sensor with steel wool, but usully they just need to be replaced.

To replace it, turn off the gas, unscrew the nut holding the tube in the gas valve, and disconnect the sensor from the ignitor/pilot assembly. Make sure your new T-couple is long enough, as the come in different lengths, you can simply coil the extra length up out of the way near the gas valve.

Install the new one as you removed the old one.

Relight pilot, be sure to hold the button down long enough, and enjoy your hot shower!

If you have any other problems, let me know, and I will be glad to help you.

Please don't forget to rate this solution.

Dec 26, 2008 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I need to know how to light the pilot on my somewhat old water heater. The model is called the challenger 5 the model number 153.331471


On these older gas water heaters there is a gas control with temperature selection and below that is a removable cover. Once you remove the cover you can gain access to the pilot. You must rotate the knob on the top of the control to the pilot position. When in the pilot position, hold the red button down and light the pilot. Continue to hold the button down after the pilot is lit for about one minute. If when you release the red button the pilot goes out, try one more time. If it goes out again after releasing the button your thermocouple is bad and must be replaced. The thermocouple generates a millivolt electrical current that hold the gas valve in the operating condition when the pilot is lit. When the pilot goes out there is no heat to generate this small electrical field.

Jun 08, 2008 | Kenmore Air Conditioners

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