Question about InFocus Proxima UltraLight LX2 Multimedia Projector

4 Answers

Washed out image with little contrast

The picture has lost all contrast. Unless the scene is bright, I can see little other than black. I understand the lcd panels degrade over time, especially the blue. Can I replace this panel? Is it cost effective to be worth doing? If so, where can I get the replacement?

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  • craigskev Jul 09, 2008

    Model Number: Ultralight LX2

    Chassis Number: MB6-LX200

    Serial Number: G0201845

    Manufactured: February 2000

  • craigskev Jul 09, 2008

    Both of these links are for a new bulb. The bulb is not the problem. I recently replaced the bulb and there was no change in the picture.

  • craigskev Jul 09, 2008

    Replacement of what?

  • craigskev Jul 09, 2008

    Any ideas as to what needs to be replaced and whether it would be worthwhile doing it?

  • craigskev Jul 09, 2008

    Any suggestion where I can purchase a replacement light engine for the proxima?

  • craigskev Jul 09, 2008

    I talked to InFocus directly. They told me the light engine is integrated into the mother board and cannot be easily replaced other than replacing the whole mother board. They said it is not user servicable and would not be economically worthwhile to repair. Is this good advice?

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Parts can be ordered contacting directly
InFocus.the website has its own online store. I tried to access
InFocus online store, but the website is temprarily down, try opening a link later.

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

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Your light engine might have been gone try to replace it .......it will cost around $60-100.....

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

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Dear Customer,
Thank you for your recent inquiry regarding your product.
In response to your query, please be advised that it appears to be u have to go for replacement .
it is availble here http://www.tradeloop.com/m/products/product_view.cfm?View=393425

and for lamps

http://reviews.cnet.com/home-theater-projectors/infocus-replacement-lamp-for/4540-7858_7-9703834-4.html


Yours sincerely,

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

  • Harrish Mugundhan Jul 09, 2008

    hello sir,



    i advise u for a replacing the whole gadget.



    Changing ur motherboard cost u much more equivalent to the cost of the new device..

    so opting for buying a new is better



    thanking u

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Can you please provide a model number?

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

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  • Jaime Hernandez Jul 09, 2008

    Thank you for the info.

    I would suggest to check that all the video controls brightness and contrast before thinking in replacing the lamp.

    You can also try to get video from a different source, such a DVD player just to eliminate the possibility of a defective RBG video input.

  • Jaime Hernandez Jul 09, 2008

    I would suggest to contact the manufacturers to enquire about that engine light. If the cost is too high, it might not be even worth it to fix an 8 years old device.

    Check their website for more info.

    Good Luck.

  • Jaime Hernandez Jul 09, 2008

    I say that was a good advice since they did not try to sell you the whole part.

    It might be more economical to buy a new one instead fixing the Ultralight LX2.

  • Jaime Hernandez Jul 09, 2008

    Did you try to use the video and audio inputs as another video source?

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Make sure your contrast isn't set too high. Most ghosting is caused by either contrast, brightness or tint issues. Try adjusting these settings. Also check if there is a Dynamic contrast setting for your TV as well as this can cause ghosting also.

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In the past few day i've noticed the picture is


BRIGHTNESS. Your owner's manual probably says that the brightness setting is used to control "brightness" or "picture intensity" or something other fuzzy non-descript term. The truth is that brightness is used to set the BLACK level in the picture.
On most TVs and projectors in use today, brightness is set too high. That's because people think "a bright picture is good, so I will set it as bright as I can get." Well, that's nice in theory, but entirely wrong in practice. Setting the brightness level too high makes a black tuxedo look gray rather than black. It muddies up the shadow areas, and reduces the overall snap and crispness that the picture would have if properly calibrated.
To find the right setting for brightness, go to the image in your movie that has textured blacks and hopefully some shadow/low light areas in which there is detail. Then freeze on that frame. As you move the brightness control down, the intensity of the blacks will increase, and shadows will get darker. As you move the control all the way to zero, you will (hopefully) see that the low light shadow areas will also go to solid black and lose their detail.
The optimum setting for brightness is achieved at just the point where true black objects appear as black as your system will make them while retaining as much visible detail in the shadow areas. Above this point the blacks appear to go grayer. Below this point you lose detail in the shadows. On many video systems, this optimum point is toward the lower end of the brightness scale. But find the point that looks correct to you regardless of where it is on the scale.
CONTRAST. The contrast control is similarly confusing. It is also often set too high on the theory that contrast is good, and therefore we might as well get the most we can out of our set by turning it all the way up. In fact, the contrast setting is used to control the intensity of the brightest highlights in the picture, so it is (oddly enough) the opposite of brightness control.
First, find your test scene in which you find textured whites in bright light, and freeze that frame. You are looking for the brightest elements in the picture in which you want to retain visible detail.
Let's assume you have a whitewashed fence in sunlight. If you start with the contrast set low, the fence will appear light gray rather than white. As you move the contrast control up, the fence will get whiter. Eventually details in the texture of the fence will begin to disappear.
If you continue to push contrast past the optimum point, the wood-grain texture of the fence will go solid white and all visible detail will be obliterated. Push contrast up even a little further, and our fenceposts might actually appear to expand very slightly due to a glow around the edges. This phenomenon, called "blooming" is a definite sign that your contrast setting is overcooking the image (and maybe your picture tube as well—don't ever leave the contrast control set this high!!!)
Find the point at which whites look white while retaining as much texture detail as possible. This is your optimum contrast setting. On most video systems, this setting is toward the higher end of the scale, but it can be anywhere. Find the point that looks correct to you. (By the way, unlike TV's, digital projectors will not bloom)
Now…note the following: brightness and contrast can be to some degree interactive. Your new contrast setting may have affected your brightness. So return to the brightness scene and verify that your blacks are still black, and you still have maximum detail in the shadows. Adjust it if necessary, then return and adjust the contrast setting once again if necessary. (You can see that this is much easier if the black and white elements you are testing all appear in the same image!)
COLOR. The color control on your set determines the level of color intensity in the image. One of the most common errors people make in calibrating their video systems is overdriving the color. That's what makes Larry King look reddish-orange on the TV at the gym. Overdriving color is common because once again, people naturally think, "I want to get as much color as I can out of this color TV, so I will crank it up some to make sure I get the most out of it!" No. Bad mistake.
If you move the color setting down to zero you will notice that your picture will turn into a black and white image. The optimum setting for color is achieved by increasing the setting just to the point where colors look natural and not a bit more! Flesh tones should look natural and without any hint of an unnatural glow. Grass should look naturally green rather than screaming spray-paint green.
When adjusting color, make sure that your test image has relatively unsaturated colors. Flesh tones or natural landscapes are ideal. It is impossible to set color properly if you are using a brilliant red Ferrari as your test subject.
On the large majority of video systems, the optimum setting for color is somewhere near the middle of the scale. However, trust your eyes for the optimum setting and think "what looks like the most natural, accurate reproduction of reality?" Any overdriving of color will make the image look artificial.
TINT or HUE. The tint control adjusts color balance rather than color intensity. It is an easy control to set properly, but for some reason many people don't get it right. When flesh tones look either too green or too magenta, a phenomenon you see with amazing frequency, it is because the tint control is not set properly.
Find a human face and freeze-frame it. (In choosing your test subject, note that lighter skin tones will show errors in tint more readily than darker skin tones). As you move the tint control to one end of the spectrum, the face turns green; as you move it to the other extreme, the face turns magenta (red+blue).
The correct setting for tint is the point near the middle of the scale at which you can detect no hint of either green or magenta. It is the most neutral point between the two extremes. The flesh tone looks the most natural at this point.
SHARPNESS or DETAIL. The final setting is sharpness or detail. Now, pray tell, who in their right mind wouldn't want the sharpest, most detailed picture they could get? And since there is a control that lets you turn it up, why not turn it up? That's what many folks do, and of course it's exactly the wrong thing to do.
The sharpness control adds processed information to the picture that is NOT part of the original video signal. It adds artificially highlighted edges, and makes the picture look less natural than it otherwise would. This is most evident along the continuous edge of a dark object against a middle-toned background. When sharpness is overdriven the dark edge will be outlined by a white ringing effect that increases contrast just along the edge of your dark object. That edge "highlighting" effect is created by the sharpness control. It is an artificial manipulation of the image. It wasn't in the original scene, and it shouldn't be on your screen either.
On most televisions, the optimum setting for sharpness is zero. On many digital projectors, the optimum setting is either in the low or middle part of the scale. Picture tube televisions and digital projectors behave differently in this regard; on a digital projector it is often possible to fuzz the image by setting sharpness too low.
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