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I'm using a Nikon D3100 with a 55-200mm lens, and I'm trying to set my aperture around 1.8 to shoot bokeh, but it won't let me set it lower then 4. I had a 18-55mm lens on earlier, and it wouldn't let me set it lower then 5. My ISO is at 100. Any idea how to set it lower?

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You can't set the aperture any lower than the maximum aperture of the lens. This is engraved on the lens. It may say something like f4-6.3 or something similar meaning that f4 is the largest opening of that particular lens. If you find a 55-200mm lens capable of an opening of f1.8, it will cost more than your first car.

Posted on Jan 02, 2011

  • AbbeyLG Jan 03, 2011

    typrice is correct. But please also pay attention at what mm (zoom) your lens is zoomed out. When you have a zoom lens like you have, the aperture also changes as you zoom out. So even if the lens can set an f3.5, if you have it zoomed all the way, then the best it could do is probably f5.6 or higher.

    Quick Trick: If these are the only lens you have. Try this trick to blur as much of your background as possible. Though you shall not get anything close to a 1.8.

    1) Zoom your lense all the way out to 55mm.
    2) Set the camera to spot or center weighted metering
    3) Set the camera into Aperture priority and set the aperture as wide as possible. Lowest number
    4) Come as close as the lens shall allow you to focus onto your subject
    5) Focus using a the center focusing point, and take your picture. This shall blow much of the background.

    NOTE: I personally use a Nikon 70mm - 200mm f2.8 lens.

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Message: Lock lens aperture ring at minimum aperture (largest f-number) I think I'm doing this but the message won't go away and the camera won't work.


You must lock the aperture ring to f/22, so the camera can engage the aperture adjustment lever on the lens. Then, you can change the aperture with the command wheel.

When you change the aperture with the command wheel the aperture ring on the lens doesn't move when the camera actually adjusts the lens aperture.

Take the lens off and locate the aperture adjustment lever on the lens mount.

Unfortunately, this won't work with older AF lenses. So if you are using an older lens, the only thing you can do is change the camera setting to M (Manual) to adjust the aperture on the lens yourself.

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Unsharp pictures when using the leica macro 90mm 4:0 lens as a telephoto lens


Besides any problems with the focus mechanism which should be fairly obvious, your shutter speed may be too slow. A slow shutter speed can be set manually or caused automatically when using a smaller aperture in lower light settings, the camera compensates by opening up the shutter. Try testing your lens out in bright scenes with the aperture open. Another problem is with manual lenses at low apertures. It can be difficult to manually focus at just the right point because shooting around f.4 with a longer barrel lens leads to a very shallow depth of field. To compensate, try a smaller aperture or take a few photos of a subject while adjusting your focus to get the "money shot." If all the above fails make sure to double check your sensor and lens are clean, a greasy or dirty lens will always lead to less crisp photos.

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1 Answer

How do you take a pic with the Nikon d60 where the background is blurred?


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth of field. DoF is controlled by three factors: distance from camera to subject, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The closer the camera is to the subject, the narrower the DoF. The longer the lens focal length, the narrower the DoF. The larger the lens aperture, the narrower the DoF.

Get as close to the subject as practical, and use as long a focal length as practical. I realize these two aims conflict with each other. For portraits, you want a focal length in the 50-90mm range and move in to fill the frame.

You want to shoot with as wide an aperture as you can. Unfortunately most lenses are not at their sharpest wide open. Also, the 18-55mm lens doesn't open up all that wide, f/3.5 at 18mm and f/5.6 at 55mm. To get the widest aperture, you can shoot in the P or A modes. If you don't want to leave the point&shoot modes, try using the Portrait mode.

Since you're not paying for film, I suggest you experiment with the different settings and shooting setups, moving closer and farther from the subject, using different focal lengths, and using different apertures, and see what results you get.

Nov 22, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm lens

1 Answer

Well i was wondering how i could get a bokeh effect behind a subject? does anyone know? is it possible to do this without a filter?


hello! Yes, you can since the Coolpix L100 has a 15X telephoto lens, you can use the second method described below.
Bokeh is a photographic term used to describe a lens effect wherein the background of the photo is out of focus. This effect is used to blur out distracting backgrounds and give emphasis to the the primary subject of the photo.There are two ways to get bokeh when taking pictures. The first is by using a very large aperture to get a shallow depth of field. You can set your camera’s aperture to f/5 or below. This will effectively throw everything behind your subject out of focus. You can also blur out the background of your photo by using a long telephoto lens. There is no hard rule on how long your lens should be but the longer its reach, the more pronounced the bokeh is going to be.

Dec 25, 2009 | Nikon COOLPIX L100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

ON DISPLY, APERTURE SHOW fEE AND DONT SHOOT


In all but aperture priority mode and manual modes you must set this lens to it's minimum aperture setting (i.e. highest number) to allow the camera body to fully control the aperture for you.

You'll also get this problem when using certain Nikon bodies which rely solely on electronic communication of the lens settings to the camera body (e.g. Nikon F75) as they lack the ability to read the mechanical linkages on the rear of the lens.

Oct 04, 2009 | Nikon Telephoto AF Micro Nikkor 60mm...

1 Answer

I HAVE THE SAME PROBLEM.


If you're using the kit lens (17-85mm f/4-5.6), the maximum aperture achieveable when fully zoomed out (wide) is f/4 and when fully zoomed in, f/5.6 (that's what the f/4-5.6 stands for). The minimum aperture on this lens is not a problem since you're only making it smaller. i.e., f/22.

Try zooming back and turning the Aperture adjustment dial. You should be able to get f/4.

If you need bigger aperture to get a nice bokeh or to take portraits where the background is blurred while the subject in focus (aka shallow Depth of Field), try lens that are f/3.5 or f/2.8 max. The Canon 50mm f/1.8 is quite affordable (around US$100-120).

Sep 17, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Bakground of the photo is a bit blurry


this is, in most cases, a desired effect (bokeh) which is used to "detach" the subject from the background avoiding the viewer of the picture to be distracted by the background. This technique is widely used in portraits. This effect effect will be more pronounced when the lens is wide open (in your case it should be f/3.5 if I remember well...). To practice you may try the following: set you camera to "A" mode and take one picture of something (it should not be a landscape) using the smallest aperture after this take the same pic using the biggest aperture. With the lower f number you should get a blurry background and with the biggest the backgroud should be in focus!

May 17, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

I use first time nikon d60.


it would depend on the lighting. you can lower down your shutter speed, or change the white-balance or aperture on the camera. make sure that your camera is set on manual. hit me back on the results.

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1 Answer

Without flash


Although your eyes can adapt to see well in low light, the camera needs a lot more light to take good photos than your eye needs to see in low light. Taking photos of a play or other indoor performance is a very difficult situation.

1) You need a fast lens, one that shoots at aperture f/2.8 or faster (i.e. f/2.0, f/1.8, or f/1.4). Your 18-55 lens is f/3.5-5.6, which is not a fast lens. When you zoom to 55mm, you can only shoot at f/5.6 which is 1/4 the light gathered at f/2.8, so the shutter speed needs to be 4 times longer, which means 4 times slower.

2) Set the camera to use the highest ISO it offers. Look in your manual for instructions on how to change the ISO. Don't forget to set it back when you are done!

3) Use the shooting mode that lets you specify the aperture. The camera will select the shutter. I'm not familar with the mode name for Nikon cameras - for a Canon camera this is the AV mode (for Aperture Value).

4) You may want to dial in some -EV - this means a "minus" value in the Exposure Compensation. I usually set this to -1/2 or -1 for low light shots. The photos come out just a tiny bit darker than normal, but the trade-off is that I get a faster shutter speed.

5) Even with all the settings above, the shutter speed is likely to still be quite slow. You must hold the camera very still. A monopod or tripod is usually necessary. In addition it helps if your lens has VR (vibration reduction) to minimize camera shake. Finally, no matter how still you hold the camera, if the subject is moving then the image will be blurry. So only shoot when the subject (person on stage) is relatively still.

If you don't have your camera manual let me know, and I'll look for it online and give you a link to the pages that detail the settings you need to change.

Dec 28, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

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