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Westinghouse 77875 is there wires to attach ceiling fan to ceiling? do you need an existing power source?

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The light on a fan is flickering. It doesn't appear to be the light bulbs. This fan has a remote control and it controls the fan OK and turns the light on and off but it flickers. What could be...


Try changing or testing the batteries in the remote or take the remote out of the fans range. See if this stops the flickering. It can also be the individual bulb. Sometimes the monofillament wires become loosened. It won't hurt the fan to use a broken bulb but it will shorten the life of the bulb. They do get the daylights shook out of them! If all the bulbs flicker it can be the twist connects. These are located under the ceiling plate cover. To check, shut off the fan or turn off the braker switch to make sure you don't get a shock (but I really doubt it). Remove the face plate ceiling screws to expose the wiring. There should be a black and a red cap that holds wires together. Black is ground red is power. One at a time hold the wires of the black cap with one hand and give the cap a gentle clockwise twist with your other hand to see if they need tightening. Repeat with the other colored cap. Push the wires back up inside the housing if needed and replace the cover.
These are the simpelist things to try before calling an expert. I hope this helps?

Sep 22, 2011 | Vacuums

1 Answer

Hampton bay fan pull chain broke. The electrician took the light kit down and all four wires had come out of the pull switch he could not install replacement switch without knowing which wires went to...


1. Open the switch housing of the fan. This is usually achieved either by removing two screws on the bottom cap of the switch housing, or three screws on the side. Remove the pullchain assembly by unscrewing the brass finial on the outside of the switch housing.

2. Make careful note of which wires attach where to the pullchain. The chain itself will be marked L-1-2-3 or A-B-C-D or similar, the wires will customarily be of different colors, but if not, mark both the wires and pullchain if necessary. MAKE CAREFUL NOTE OF WHICH WIRES ATTACH WHERE. Every fan is different and if you do not make note there will likely be a complicated guessing game. I cannot stress this step enough. Make careful note of which wires attach where to the pullchain. For example:

Black - L, Grey - 1, Brown - 2, Purple - 3.

Some fans may use only two or three wires, some may have a pullchain with two layers and five or more wires. Regardless, make careful note of which wires attach where.

3. Remove the wires from the pullchain. In some cases they may be attached via wire nuts, in which case, remove the wire nuts. However in most fans the wires are inserted directly into the pullchain. Don't make the mistake of cutting them, they can be removed completely by inserting a very small flathead screwdriver into the slot next to each wire. You will notice the ends of the wires are soldered, this is so they will attach to the pullchain.

4. Determine the correct replacement pullchain. This is the tricky part. Many pullchains look alike but in fact switch differently. There are a few factors, first of all, how many speeds does the fan have as controlled by the pullchain? Second of all, how many wires are used to connect the pullchain? These will determine maybe 75% of replacement pullchains. Here are some examples:

- If the fan has three speeds and the pullchain has four wires, it is most commonly a L-1-2-3 pullchain. This is a single pole triple throw switch with an off position. It connects the power from L to 1, 2, or 3 respectively, one for each speed.

- If the fan has three speeds and the pullchain has three wires, it is an L-1-2-1+2 pullchain. This is a single pole double throw switch with an off position and a "both" position. That is to say, in connects power from L to 1 or 2 respectively, and on the third position connects to both. This is the same switch used in many lamps to switch on one bulb (or set of bulbs), the other, or both.

- If the fan has two speeds and the pullchain has three wires, it is most commonly a L-1-2 pullchain. This is a single pole double throw switch with an off position. It connects the power from L to 1 or 2 respectively.

- If the fan has three speeds and the pullchain has more than four wires, there are a handful of different pullchain possibilities however most hardware stores stock the most common replacement. This would customarily be a double pole switch with two layers of wires attaching.

The replacements mentioned above are the most common examples . . . but as I said, there are other switches that may appear identical (for example three speed fan, four wires, but it's NOT the first switch I mentioned). In most cases I would first try the replacement mentioned above. These are the switches that your local hardware store should stock. If the fan does not work with the likely replacement, does not work on all speeds, spins too fast, too slow, etc . . . and you are sure you properly noted which wire connected where on the old pullchain and wired the replacement correctly . . . then it appears your fan is in the 25% that uses a non-standard switch. There are three ways to determine the correct replacement switch:

- Contact the manufacturer. If they are still in business they can theoretically send you the correct replacement switch. If they are no longer in business, contact someone on our forums or other ceiling fan experts, we/they may be aware of the correct replacement for your particular model

- If you can still switch speeds on the old pullchain, use an ohm-meter to check for continuity between the various wires on the various positions. In most cases the important relationships are between L and the various other positions, for example a three speed four wire switch might be L-1-2+3-3. This means in the first position L connects to 1, in the second position L to 2 and 3, in the third position L to 3, fourth position off.

- If you can not operate the switch, you can open up it's plastic casing, either to operate the switch by hand, or to observe the metal bands inside. Some websites that sell replacement switches offer diagrams of the metal bands, by matching your switch up to the diagram you can determine the correct replacement.

5. Ok, you've determined and obtained the correct replacement switch.Seeing as you made careful note of which wires connect to where on the old switch, reconnect the wires in the same manner to the replacement switch. If your old switch did not require the tips of the wires be soldered you may need to do so in order to properly attach them to the pullchain.

6. Reattach the pullchain to the switch housing and replace the finial. Replace the switch housing cap with the two or three screws.

Additional Notes:

I. Fan lights where the pullchain is simply on/off use a two wire pullchain. This pullchain is a very standard on/off switch and it is simply connected to the two wires to which the old pullchain was connected. The wires can be reversed and it will still work. Lights where you can select one bulb, the other bulb, or both use the pullchain mentioned with that example above.

II. Some fans do not use the pullchain to control speeds, but instead have a dial or other control on the fan for speed selection. The pullchain is used to turn the fan off and on, and in some cases also to reverse the fan, select between the high speed and the various low speeds derived from the speed control, or also control the light. In these various examples:

- When the pullchain only switches the fan on and off, it most likely has only two wires and is equivalent to the light kit pullchain mentioned above. It is a basic on/off switch

- When the pullchain reverses the fan or switches the speed control in and out of the circuit, it is most likely the three wire two speed pullchain mentioned above. It is a L-1-2 switch. There are some exceptions such as certain model Fasco fans.

- When the pullchain controls both the fan and light, it is the three wire three speed pullchain mentioned above. It is a L-1-2-1+2 switch.

III. If for whatever reason you do not know which wires connect to which locations on the pullchain, you may yet have some options. For starters, black is almost always L. Some other common color combinations:

For many four wire pullchains:

L - Black, 1 - Grey, 2 - Brown, 3 - Purple
L - Orange, 1 - Black, 2 - Yellow, 3 - Purple
L - Black, 1 - Grey, 2 - Brown, 3 - Green
L - Grey, 1 - Yellow, 2 - Purple, 3 - Black
L - White, 1- Black, 2 - Blue, 3 - Yellow


For many three wire pullchains:

L - Black, 1 - Blue, 2 - Red

May 02, 2011 | Vacuums

1 Answer

How to assemble the hawaiian breeze oscillating floor fan


I cannot find exact instructions but I did find a general guide to assembly. they are usually very easy to assemble.

A standing fan is a portable fan that has a set of three oscillating blades on a long neck. The neck, also called the pole or the leg, is mounted on the floor. Standing fans have evolved from their origins as noisy accessories that blew away papers in their vicinity to silent fans whose direction can be controlled remotely. When placed at a convenient location, a standing fan can distribute air evenly to the entire room. Its speed can be controlled, and many standing fans can be programmed to stop at a set time.

  1. Installation Requirements
    • The only requirement for installing a standing fan is making sure it is near a power source. The entire unit can be assembled manually with only a screwdriver. A single standing fan, either an oscillating or pedestal fan, is very simple to assemble for basic home use.
    Pole and Base
    • The first step is to lay the parts on a floor. Then assemble the pole on the base of the stand. This is very simple, because the grooves for the screws are already drilled, so the screws just need to be inserted and screwed in. Screwing the pole into the base of the fan is required on some models; on others, the pole and the base are molded together and no screws are needed.
    Motor and Fan Installation
    • One some fans, you have to install the motor and oscillating arm to the pole. This again is done by screwing screws into predrilled holes. Grooves for long screws are at the top end of the pole, where they attach to the motor of the fan. Once the motor is placed on the top of the pole, insert the screws in the predrilled holes and tighten the screws. The next step is to wire the three blades. This is done by taking the wires from the motor and joining them to the sockets in the pole. This finishes the assembly procedure.
      To turn the fan on, ensure that the wires fit securely together. A loose connection cannot not only hamper the performance of the fan, it can also lead to problems such as electrical shocks or burning wires.



I hope this helps

good luck

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Apr 07, 2011 | Vacuums

1 Answer

I have a model 484 709 UPC 792145330547 The fan/light is close to ceiling (instalation). Their is supposed to be an "o" ring to remove the fan/light from the celling. I cannot find it!!! ...


Remove the cowl at the ceiling by removing the screws in the cowl (very close to the ceiling). Use caution in removing them as the weight of the fan may be carried by these screws. Depending on the style, though, the weight may be borne by supports beneath the cowl. Either way, this will get you access to the wiring, allowing you to change out/remove the fan. If the fan and cowl are together, and close to the ceiling, there is usually a method of hanging the assembly while the wiring connections are made during installation. Look for a hook that the screw hole will go over, supporting the fan.

Best regards,

--W/D--

Jan 19, 2011 | Vacuums

1 Answer

I have a broken chain switch that will not allow me to use all four light sockets. presently only using two sockets. Question: can I by pass the switch by combining all the black wires from the leading...


The blue should be for the lights and you can ty this into the black. The red should be the incoming for the motor to the fans. Some models are different and I strongly believe you have got to be talking about a ceiling fan and not a vacuum. Is this a test question? Because it is a darn good one if you do not mind me saying so however you might have not noticed to check or uncheck a box for the fans. Good luck.

Nov 02, 2010 | Vacuums

1 Answer

The switch on the wall only works to control the fan and not the light- it won't turn off the ligght. I replaced the switch but it did not solve the problem


If this is a new installation and there was only one switch on the wall, say to control a light that was once there, then you have that switch hooked up only to the fan. If you want to control the light as well, it has to be wired up at the box where the fan attaches to the ceiling. HOWEVER, with only one switch, the light and fan will always be ON or OFF at the same time. You would need to wire in another switch to control the fan and lights independently.

Oct 03, 2010 | Vacuums

1 Answer

I have a ceiling fan with 3 lights. We do not use the remote control and did not install it. The lights stopped going on today. The fan works, but the lights do not. I have tried changing bulbs, but...


Sounds like a loose wire. If you turn the lights on via a wall switch or a pull chain, I would start where you hooked the wire for the lights to the house electricity, most likely where the fan meets the ceiling. Pull the "bell" part of the fan down that covers the ceiling box and see if there is a loose wire inside. There should be a plastic cap called a wire nut that covers the wire connection. Make sure it is secure and if possible, put some electrical tape around it. Please let me know if you have questions.

Sep 12, 2010 | Vacuums

1 Answer

No manual with my fan, trying to put the fan up, please advise


Kind of hard to help you with this little information you have provided, but this is what I would do. FIRST and most importantly, you MUST use an approved box hanger to hold the (I am assuming a ceiling fan) fan to the electrical box for connection. BE SURE THE POWER SOURCE TO BE USED IS TURNED OFF!!!!!! Determine the power wires for the fan unit (most likely a black, white and green wire) and, observing the proper polarity, connect to the house wiring. Make sure you are using an equipment ground to the fan. This is usually a bare or green wire. If these instructions are not clear to you, you may want to have a professional install the unit. You should also check with your local municipality about the need for a permit to do this installation.

Aug 27, 2010 | Vacuums

1 Answer

Loud noise


When the motor bearings start to go bad, they will make a loud noise. Some motors if a piece broke off of the fan, then it also will make a loud noise. You may have to replace the motor.

Dec 25, 2007 | Westinghouse WST1500 Wired Special Edition...

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