Question about Canon imageRUNNER 400S Copier

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How can we avoid moire or screen clash when taking copies of originals containing half tones photos?

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Enter service mode(*28*>copier>adjust>ae>) enter value 1 there touch ok and press reset twice check half tone copy and adjust from service mode accordingly.

Posted on Jan 06, 2011

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1 Answer

What is descreen option in Hp G3110 scanner


It Is used when scanner painted documents that are printed by using screen me that such as newspapers. It stop moire patterns from being generated on the scanned document. There are strange curved (normally) Patterson. De-screening doesnt always remotely these totally but should help. If you haven't seen moire pattern in before, hold 2 piece of net curtain up against a light source, you'll see it as you move one across the other.

Sep 19, 2014 | HP Scanjet G3110 Color Photo Scanner, 4800...

1 Answer

I have just got a new HP 1050 Deskjet J410 Series printer. I am not able to increase or reduce a document when copying. What do i need to do?


Press Copy until Reduce/Enlarge appears in the top line of the dis
The following options are available in the Reduce/Enlarge menu.
you will have three choices.
Reduce/Enlarge
Actual Size
Custom 100%
Full Page 91%
Legal > Ltr 72%
Also:
Use Photo Fit to Page when you want to automatically enlarge your original
photo to fill the printable area of the paper size loaded in the paper tray.
Photo Fit to Page only enlarges original photos that are standard photo sizes. The
standard photo sizes are as follows:
• 3.5 by 5 inches (9 by 13 cm)
• 4 by 6 inches (10 by 15 cm)
• 5 by 7 inches (13 by 18 cm)
• 6 by 8 inches (15 by 20 cm)
• 8 by 10 inches (25 by 25 cm)
For originals containing text or photos that are not a standard size, use Reduce/
Enlarge.
Manual is HERE Copy functions start on page 27.

Mar 27, 2011 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

How to have different message tones


best way to change tones is to download them on to your pc and then connect your phone to pc with samsung software that should have come with the phone and copy tones in to music folder of your mobile. not sure on the wallpaper - im guessing they have to be particularl size to display correctly ?

Jan 23, 2009 | Samsung SGH-J600 Cellular Phone

1 Answer

3535


Oh, it's the colors you are having a problem with. Then you probably want to perform an Auto Gradation Adjustment. It's on pages 162-163 of the manual found here: http://download.support.xerox.com/pub/docs/DocuColor_3535/userdocs/any-os/en/3535_User_Guide.pdf

Here is what it says:

Auto Gradation Adjustment
Auto Gradation Adjustment is a color calibration for the copier and printer. An Auto Gradation Adjustment compensates for differences between the actual and the expected toner densities for each color. An Auto Gradation Adjustment should be performed whenever there is a noticeable change in the appearance (quality) of the output, particularly changes in color
tones or densities. Performing an Auto Gradation Adjustment on a regular basis will help to maintain consistent color quality over time.

NOTE: Since an Auto Gradation Adjustment can affect all jobs for all users, it is recommended that this procedure be performed only by the Machine Administrator.

Copy Job - Text Compensates tones when a text original is copied.
Copy Job - Photo Compensates tones when a photo original is copied.
Print Job Compensates tones when printing with controller line screen.
Network Controller - 1 Compensates tones when printing with Network Controller screen type 1.
Network Controller - 2 Compensates tones when printing with Network Controller screen type 2.

NOTE: Printing the chart for Auto Gradation does not increase the meter count.
NOTE: When gradation adjustment is executed, the following
changes will be made to default copy settings set in System Settings mode: Copy density = Normal or Auto, Color Shift = Normal, Saturation = Normal, Color Balance = 0, Sharpness = 0.
NOTE: When Print or Network Controller gradation adjustment is executed, the printer’s output profiles for the available screen types are compensated.

1 On the Image Quality Adjustment screen, select Auto Gradation Adjustment.
2 Load 8.5x11 inch or A4 paper into Tray 5 (Bypass). Move the paper guide to gently touch the edge of the paper.

3 Select the desired gradation adjustment screen:
• Copy Job - Text
• Copy Job - Photo
• Print Job
• Network Controller - 1
• Network Controller - 2
Press Start. The Adjustment Chart is output.
4 Place the Adjustment Chart face down on the Document Glass with both Magenta color patches against the left side of the glass.
5 Place 5 sheets of white paper on top of the Adjustment Chart and close the DADF. Select Start.
6 To continue Auto Gradation Adjustment with other screens, repeat steps 2 to 5. When you are finished, select Close until the System Settings screen is displayed.
7 Select Exit to exit the System Settings mode.

Jun 24, 2008 | Xerox DocuColor 3535 Copier

1 Answer

Cant figure out how to enlarge a copy on fax machine?


Hi,
To select the resolution Select the desired resolution according to the type of document.
“STANDARD”: For printed or typewritten originals with normal-sized characters.
“FINE”: For originals with small printing.
“SUPER FINE”: For originals with very small printing. This setting only works with other compatible fax machines.
“PHOTO”: For originals containing photographs, shaded drawings, etc.
Using the “FINE”, “SUPER FINE” or “PHOTO” setting will increase transmission time. If the resolution setting is changed during feeding, it will be effective

If you go to:
http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/KXFHD331.PDF
You will find the online manual for this machine.
Hope this will help you...

Apr 28, 2008 | Panasonic KX-FHD331 Plain Paper Thermal...

1 Answer

Ripples appear in the image when photographing an object with fine plaids or stripes. How can I fix that?


When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red cross-stripes and black cross-stripes overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly. Reference You may find another Moire effect displayed on the LCD of the camera. As this is caused by the aligned pixels on the LCD, this effect does not necessarily appear in pictures you have taken.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon GL2 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

Picture ripples


The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the fine pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red stripes and black plaids overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly.

Aug 31, 2005 | Canon PowerShot Pro1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Picture ripples


The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the fine pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red stripes and black plaids overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly.

Aug 31, 2005 | Canon PowerShot SD300 / IXUS 40 Digital...

1 Answer

What is moir??


Sometimes odd stripes or colors will appear in a digital image, either from a high-end digital camera, or from a scanned image. This effect is called moir? and is caused when a fine pattern in the subject (such as the weave in a fabric or very close, parallel lines in architecture) matches the pattern of the imaging chip. When two patterns meet, often a third, new pattern is created. This third pattern is called moir?. Notice in the illustration below the round, circular patterns (on the right) created as the two grids are combined; this is moir?. In order to reduce (or eliminate) moir?, a special anti-aliasing filter is mounted in the camera. If too strong a filter is mounted an overall soft image will be produced, but with no moir?. If a weaker filter is chosen the image will be sharper, but there is more of a chance for moir? to happen in some circumstances. Nikon has chosen to produce the sharpest image that can be made, even though there may be some moir? in parts of some images. Notice the red/blue stripes on the bottom of the bag (which should be solid grey) To help reduce moir? there are many techniques to use: Change angle of camera. Since the angle of the camera and subject causes moir?, slightly changing the angle of the camera (by rotating the camera) can remove or change any moire that is present. Change camera position Again, changing the angle relationship by moving left or right, up or down can reduce moir?. Change focus point Moir? is caused by very sharp focus and high detail on fine patterns; slightly changing the focus point changes the sharpness and can help to remove moir?. Change lens focal length Different lenses or focal length settings can be used to alter or remove moir? Remove with software Nikon Capture (as well as several third-party, Adobe® Photoshop® plug-ins) can be used to remove any moir? that does appear in the final image. Of course it may not be possible to remove all moir? in all cases, but in general an overall clean, sharp image with slight moir? is preferred over a soft focus image. Moir? can happen with images from all digital cameras and scanners, but is more likely to happen with an SLR-type digital camera system because the lens, sensor and software are designed to produce the sharpest, most accurate image possible. When reviewing images to see if moir? is present be sure to be looking at the image on the computer screen (or the camera's LCD) at the full, 100% view. If you zoom out on-screen a false moir? can be produced by the pattern of the monitor grill.

Aug 30, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 3200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is moir?? (red/blue stripes)


Sometimes odd stripes or colors will appear in a digital image, either from a high-end digital camera, or from a scanned image. This effect is called moir? and is caused when a fine pattern in the subject (such as the weave in a fabric or very close, parallel lines in architecture) matches the pattern of the imaging chip. When two patterns meet, often a third, new pattern is created. This third pattern is called moir?. In order to reduce (or eliminate) moir?, a special anti-aliasing filter is mounted in the camera. If too strong a filter is mounted an overall soft image will be produced, but with no moir?. If a weaker filter is chosen the image will be sharper, but there is more of a chance for moir? to happen in some circumstances. Nikon has chosen to produce the sharpest image that can be made, even though there may be some moir? in parts of some images. To help reduce moir? there are many techniques to use: Change angle of camera. Since the angle of the camera and subject causes moir?, slightly changing the angle of the camera (by rotating the camera) can remove or change any moire that is present. Change camera position Again, changing the angle relationship by moving left or right, up or down can reduce moir?. Change focus point Moir? is caused by very sharp focus and high detail on fine patterns; slightly changing the focus point changes the sharpness and can help to remove moir?. Change lens focal length Different lenses or focal length settings can be used to alter or remove moir? Remove with software Nikon Capture (as well as several third-party, Adobe® Photoshop® plug-ins) can be used to remove any moir? that does appear in the final image. Of course it may not be possible to remove all moir? in all cases, but in general an overall clean, sharp image with slight moir? is preferred over a soft focus image. Moir? can happen with images from all digital cameras and scanners, but is more likely to happen with an SLR-type digital camera system because the lens, sensor and software are designed to produce the sharpest, most accurate image possible. When reviewing images to see if moir? is present be sure to be looking at the image on the computer screen (or the camera's LCD) at the full, 100% view. If you zoom out on-screen a false moir? can be produced by the pattern of the monitor grill.

Aug 29, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

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