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Should i have to beat the crank arms onto the spindle?

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For most bicycles if you have to beat anything to install it there is something wrong.

Crank arms should never have to be beaten on, they are usually pressed on by the mounting bolt or some similar device depending on what type of crank arm you have.

Posted on Dec 30, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Assembly manual


To remove the crank (the arm the pedal is attached to), you'll need a special tool. I got mine at a bike shop. (Bike shops are our friends.) I use the Park Tools CWP-7. It's pretty much a big bolt with a smaller bolt going through it. You'll remove the cap covering the spindle bolt (if it hasn't fallen out already), remove the bolt that holds the crank are onto the spindle, then thread the "big bolt" part of the tool into the threads for the cap on the crank. You'll then screw the inside bolt into the big bolt, which will push the crank arm off of the spindle.

Dec 30, 2013 | Genesis Onyx 29" Cruiser Bicycle

Tip

Tip for Easy Installation of the Bottom Bracket Spindle Shaft for a LeMond...


When installing a new bottom bracket spindle shaft onto your LeMond RevMaster Classic indoor cycle, it is important that you note which way it is to be used by looking at the spindle closely. We've learned a tip that makes for easy installation and that is a quick measurement will determine the proper orientation of the spindle.
  • The spindle has different lengths from the edge of the raised portion to the ends.
  • The measurement of roughly 1-3/4" will be on the RIGHT side and will attach to the RIGHT crank.
  • The opposite side measures roughly 1-1/2" from the end to the edge of the raised portion, it will attach to the LEFT crank arm.

Easy Install Tip for Bottom Bracket Spindle Shaft to LeMond RevMaster...

on Mar 11, 2015 | LeMond Bicycles Cycling

Tip

Bottom Bracket & Spindle Replacement of LeMond RevMaster


Part 1 Video Discussing the Dis-assembly & Inspection of the Bottom Bracket & Spindle for a LeMond RevMaster Bike

  • This Part 1 video will demonstrate how to inspect and adjust or remove and replace the bottom bracket and spindle on your Lemond Revmaster
  • Tools needed for this procedure:
    • 8mm Allen Wrench or Socket
    • Cotterless Crank Puller Tool
    • Lock Ring Removal Tool
    • Bottom Bracket Tool
    • Phillips Screwdriver
    • 4mm Allen Wrench
    • Bungee (optional)
    • Rubber Mallet
    • 7/8" Wrench
  • To begin remove the belt cover, there are four screws
    • You will need a 4MM Allen wrench
  • Now remove the two screws on the back from the opposite side of the bike
    • You will need a Phillips screwdriver
  • Now position the crank arm as seen in the video and remove the belt cover from the bike
  • Before removing the drive belt, tighten the brake assembly so that the flywheel is locked in place and loosen the torque on both bolts using an 8mm Allen wrench or socket
    • Do not remove them at this time only loosen them by a half a turn or so
  • Using a 7/8" wrench loosen the belt idler
  • Now use a 4mm Allen wrench to loosen the tension adjustment bolt completely, but do not remove it from the frame
  • Now remove the drive belt
    • To aid in this process you can use a bungee to slide in behind the belt at the top, as shown in the video
  • Then pull away from the bike while spinning the crank arms
  • Now remove both crank bolts with a 8MM Allen wrench or socket
    • Removal of the crank bolt on the left side of the bike is the same as removal from the right side
  • Now remove the crank arms with a crank arm puller, threading the outer portion into the crank arm as shown in the video
    • Be sure to thread the outer portion in as far as possible to prevent damage to the crank arm threads or the tools threads
    • Use a 7/8" wrench to make sure the outer portion is threaded in completely
    • Now spin the handle clockwise to press the crank arm off of the bike
    • Be careful when the crank arm comes off as if you are not holding it, it can fall in the floor
    • Also use the wrench to loosen the tool before removing the crank arm from the unit
    • Now you can unthread the tool from the cranks arm by hand after removing the crank arm from the bike
  • Next inspect the bottom bracket cups for looseness, to do this use the bottom bracket tool by hand to see if you can turn either of the bearing cups
    • To further verify the adjustment of your bottom bracket use a rubber mallet to tap lightly on each side of the spindle to check for movement from side to side, if you have movement, or one or both of the bearing cups is loose, you need to re-adjust the bottom bracket. If you are only inspecting the bottom bracket and did not find any need for adjustment you would re-assemble the bike at this point
  • Once the crank arms are removed look closely at the spindle
    • It should have defined edges and be smooth
  • As you can see by the video our spindle needs to be replaced
  • Next you will need to remove the lock ring
    • The lock ring is around the bottom bracket cup on the left side of the bike
      • In the video is an example of a lock ring
    • To use the lock ring tool you slip it over the lock ring using the three notches and torque the lock ring in the proper direction
      • This one needs to be turned counter-clockwise to loosen
    • Then remove the lock ring by spinning it off the bearing cup
  • Next you will need to use the bottom bracket tool to remove the bottom bracket cups
    • Begin with the left side
      • Slip the tool into the splines of the cup and loosen
        • For stubborn bottom brackets use a 5/16"-24 x 2" bolt and some washers with a 1-1/4" wrench
          • Slip the tool into the splines and thread the bolt with the washers into the spindle
          • Get it snug but not completely tight
      • Now use the wrench to turn the cup counter-clockwise for the left side and remove it completely
    • Remove the cup from the right side now
      • Slip the bottom bracket tool into the splines of the cup and turn it clockwise to loosen
        • For stubborn bottom brackets use a 5/16"-24 x 2" bolt and some washers with a 1-1/4" wrench
          • Slip the tool into the splines and thread the bolt with the washers into the spindle
    • If you cannot get the cups loose with this method try turning the bike on its side to get better leverage as shown in the video
  • This concludes the dis-assembly and inspection procedure of the LeMond RevMaster bottom bracket & spindle
  • Click here to see Part 2, re-assembly and installation to complete the replacement procedure
Video of Bottom Bracket and Spindle Replacement Part 1 Dis assembly LeMond...

on Feb 19, 2015 | Lemond Revmaster Lemond G-Force Digital...

1 Answer

Problem removing crank arm off of a mojave gulch bycicle from huffy


There's a special tool called a "crank puller" that has to be threaded in to the crank arms that are on your bike in order to remove them. An inexpensive version of the tool will cost around $10- which is about the same price as a shop would charge you for the work.
If you *do* want to remove them yourself, please be sure to thread the crank puller in perfectly straight and very, very carefully (backing in all the way out and starting over if you encounter resistance). Once you have threaded it almost all of the way in to the crank arm by hand, grab an adjustable wrench and tighten it down before you spin the handle to push the arm off of the bike. (If you fudge it and damage the threads inside the crank arm, you will have to pay a shop to bash them off instead- another special tool is used for that.)

Nov 27, 2011 | Huffy 26 In Ladies Mojave Gulch Bike

1 Answer

Right front lower contro arm replacement. 1990 Chevy Lumia Euro


Beat on the spindle that holds lower control to the lower spindle while prying the lower control arm down this will loosen the lower ball joint spindle. If there is a lock bolt take it out. Grind the rivets off in the lower ball joint. The new one comes with bolts to replace it (not rivets)

Sep 10, 2011 | Chevrolet Lumina Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

90 f350 7.3 IDI. I have been trying to remove the pitman arm from the steering gear box and it won't budge. i have beat on the threaded spindle coming out of the gear box into the pitman arm. put heat...


Seems like you are doing what you can. Why not disconnect the pitman from the truck and drop the steering box with the pitman arm on it? Although there is a cost for another pitman arm, you risk damaging the steering box components by beating on parts like the pitman arm that connect to the steering box gears and bearings.

If you are missing work and have extra costs, replacing the pitman arm may be a cheaper alternative.

Jul 12, 2017 | Ford F-350 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2006 Avalanche 2.0, hearing click-clack noise coming from crank under heavy pedaling- bearing noise???


It might be the bottom bracket bearing, but it is more likely to be the attachment of the crank arms to the spindle. There is a square hole in the crank arm that is tapered to fit tightly onto the the tapered square end of the bottom bracket spindle. You have to tighten the the nut (usually under a dust cover about the size of a quarter that you unscrew with a screwdriver). Both sides of course. It usually requires a thin-wall socket, or a special wrench designed for this purpose such as the one shown here.
http://www.parktool.com/product/crank-wrench-ccw-5 good luck.

Jul 04, 2011 | GT Avalanche 2.0

1 Answer

Hello, I have a very old schwinn bike and I need to replace the pedal arms. How do I get them off?


To remove 3 piece crank arms you will need a special tool called (fittingly) a crank puller. It threads into the arm and a center "bolt" torques into the spindle and pulls the arm off.

Sep 09, 2010 | Schwinn Cycling

1 Answer

Cant get the pins out of the crank brackets on the bottom of the crank. got the bolts out but there are pins on each side of the bolts. most engines have two more bolts on the outside edge but this one...


The bottom bracket is the dohickey that connects your two crank-arms together, and secures them within the bottom of the bike frame. The bottom bracket has threads around the outside that secure it into the hole in the frame. Inside, bearings surround a rotating spindle -- this lets the pedals turn free from the frame. Each side of the spindle has a mechanism to connect your crank. This may be square tapered bolts, a toothed ring (splined bottom bracket), or even a threaded bolt. The bottom bracket type must match the crank type (a crank with a square hole must be mounted on a BB with the square receiver).
Bottom brackets also come in different widths, and with different spindle widths: the bracket width should match the frame, and the spindle width should put the cranks out away from the frame, and allow the front derailleur to transfer the chain onto the smallest ring without hitting the bike frame. The BB will usually have its size printed on the cartridge, but you have to take it out to read the numbers. For example, a 68x116 bottom bracket is 58 mm wide as it fits into the frame, and the spindles are 116 mm apart. If you wanted the pedals a bit closer together, you might buy a 68x112.5 BB.
Sealed Bottom Bracket: If your bottom bracket is a sealed cartridge unit (as most are nowadays), it can't be serviced or adjusted. If it grinds, wobbles, or catches, it must be replaced as a unit. Just remove the old cartridge and replace the entire thing.
Take the chain off the chainrings, and lay it on the frame next to the bottom bracket. With the bike clamped in a workstand, shove the base of the crank-arms side-to-side to detect motion in the bottom bracket. Now try to pull the cranks away from, then back towards the bike to detect wobble. Turn the crank and listen for noises within the bottom bracket. These tests will help you identify a damaged bottom bracket.
To replace the bottom bracket, you have to do some major stripping! You must remove both the left crank and the right crank arm plus chainrings. See the crank section for additional information.
PLEASE click on the link directly for more help
http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/bracket.htm
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Apr 02, 2010 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Fitted tiagra triple to cannondale caad9 frame. bottom bracket creaking


There are many possible causes for the noise you're hearing, but the most common source of creaks is loose crank arms.

You might be able to eliminate the sound by tightening the crank arms on the bottom bracket spindle. However, I would recommend removing both crank arms from the spindle and reinstalling them after lubricating the surfaces where the spindle and crank arm meet as well as the crank arm bolts. Use a high quality grease (not oil, such as Triflow) or anti-seize compound.

Torque the crank arm bolts to the factory spec. Crank arms bolts can take a lot of torque -- about 300 ft/lbs. Most people don't have a torque wrench, so you can "guesstimate" this by applying about 50 lbs of force on the end of a 6" long wrench.

Other possibilities are loose chainrings (check each bolt where they are attached to the crank), pedals (lubricate/service bearings), bottom bracket (check it is properly torqued), chain (look for tight links), derailleur idler gear, crack in frame.

Sep 16, 2009 | Shimano Cycling

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