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I have snapped the tip section of my rod.How can i repair it.

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  • Watches Master
  • 6,771 Answers

If you are talking about the stem (crown) that pulls out to change time, this would be a job for watch repair professional. The crown would have to be replaced and probably ordered from the company.

Posted on Dec 30, 2010

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1 Answer

Timex T78587. The pin holding the metal strap to the time piece has snapped off. Is that repairable?


Take the watch to a jeweller or you can fix it yourself. That pin in the watch is removable. Use the tip of a jewellers screwdriver to push the ridge inwards. You should be able to fold the end of the strap back around it. If not, they will sell you a new strap and fit it.

Dec 18, 2016 | Timex Watches

1 Answer

How do i change the battery?


If you have a Timex digital watch, the back of your watch is probably attached with four little screws, one at each corner of the case. If you remove the screws, the back of the case should lift off with only a little nudge in case some grunge has glued the back to the rest of the case.

On the other hand, if you have an analog Timex watch (i.e., one with a traditional face), it almost certainly has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you will ultimately need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place (more on this later).

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. Many Timex watches with snap-fit cases have a small triangle / pointer etched into the case back to suggest where you should fit a case knife to pop off the watch. If you don't see that small raised section or a marker, you'll need to choose a location to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose.

If you can't press the back on securely after replacing the battery, you will need to use a case press to complete the job. A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case knives, case presses, and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 31, 2011 | Timex Watches

1 Answer

How do I open the back of the Acqua Indiglo watch so I can change the CR2016 battery?


Your watch has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you will ultimately need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place (more on this later).

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. Many Timex watches have a small triangle / pointer etched into the case back to suggest where you should fit a case knife to pop off the watch. If you don't see that small raised section or a marker (Aqua is a discount brand of Timex), you'll need to choose a location to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose.

If you can't press the back on securely after replacing the battery, you will need to use a case press to complete the job. A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case knives, case presses, and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 29, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

CANNOT GET BACK OPEN TO REPLACE BATTERY


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back, just in case I'm wrong.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for a pretty reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 29, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

How to open the back


1

Determine the type of case back on the watch. Set the watch face down on a soft surface and look at the back. If it has slots, it is defined as a screw-back case. If it is smooth, it is defined as a snap-back case.
2

To open a screw-back watch, use the metal blade of a standard screwdriver to turn the slots counterclockwise. A case-back wrench, which can be purchased at watch-repair stores, can also be used. Set the metal tips of the wrench into the back's slots and turn it counterclockwise to open.
3

For a snap back case, place the metal blade of a standard screwdriver in the indent between the watch and the case. Gently apply pressure to lift the case up and off of the watch.
4

Close the case back by setting it back onto the watch. For snap-back cases, line up the indent on the side of the watch and press gently on the case back to close. For screw-back cases, use the screwdriver blade or case-back wrench to turn the slots clockwise, thereby closing the case shut.

Feb 06, 2011 | Bulova Watch

1 Answer

MY BACK WILL NOT SNAP BACK ON


I had the same problem and tried everything. Here was my solution. Use a double-sided 2" rubber mallet. (Below is a photo of a similiar mallet.) Be sure to use caution while pressing with force. There is always the danger of cracking the crystal, however, my solution worked perfectly for me. I hope it does for you, too. Keep in mind that some watch backs screw on with a special tool, but if you snapped yours off, it should snap back on.


sandyjd.jpg

Start by lying the watch, crystal side down, on a vinyl padded notebook. Also make sure you have it aligned properly with the stem.

  1. Place one of the rubber mallet heads over the watch back.
  2. With all your force, push down on the other end of the mallet's head.
  3. Voila, you should hear a slight pop and the back will again be secure on the watch.

Hope this helps and you are as successful as I was with this tip.


--Sandy

Jan 19, 2011 | Timex 40131 Wristwatch

1 Answer

Trouble replacing rear analog watch cover


mcdevito75 here, Replaceing that back cover can be a real pain. I think I have a tip for you. Place the cover only in the Frig. for about 15--30 minutes, the cold should shrink the cover just a bit so it may be easier to snap back onto the back of your watch.---------- OR, Make sure any cutout on the back of the watch is lined up with the stem, make sure any lip used to pry the back cover off the watch is also lined up with the case of the watch if need be. Place the back cover on the watch back, place the watch on a sturdy table, counter top etc. Crystal up, now with even,even pressure useing your palm, press down on the crystal, this should get the back cover to snap back on. Remeber even, even down ward pressure useing the flat palm of your hand on the crystal, press down slowly and the back cover should snap on. If not, visit a small watch repair shop in your area as they have a special pliers just for this job.

Aug 17, 2010 | Armitron 165 watch

1 Answer

Can't snap back the back plate.


RECOMENDATION:
Seek professional help.

GOTO
http://www.watch-clock-makers.org/
Hope this tip helps.
r/ David
http://antiqueclock.clockstop.com/

Mar 08, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

Replace rear cover on swiss army brand watch


You are going to need professional help for this one.

Recommendation:
Take your watch to your local watch repair shop they have a watch press that will press the back cover on.

Hope this tip helps

Feb 06, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

Clock cleaning


This is not as easy as you might think. We learn decades to repair (cleaning included) watches and clocks. Any tip would be with no use, as every clock needs individual and specific attention.
The only tip is: visit an eBay and buy the clock repairers book. I've seen some books there.
All this is under the ''Jewellery and Watches'' section.

Mar 27, 2009 | Watches

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