Question about Audio & Video Receivers

Open Question

I have a Kustom Sidewinder Tuck and Roll amplifier, which I have been using for bass- Before, setting the volume to 5 was plenty loud, however, recently, I have to crank it to max to get a volume that is still even a little too low. It doesn't sound like the speaker is blown when I play, its just really quiet. Also, there is a little light fuzz and crackle even with no cables connected. This happened basically overnight. Any solutions? Thanks!

Posted by on

5 Suggested Answers

robotek
  • 1512 Answers

SOURCE: My Marantz PM-32 Amplifier has

Hi

First thing to check is to see if someone has turned on the Tape Monitor has been turned on by someone. The symptoms you describe certainly sound like it. Check that out and get back to me if it does not solve the problem

regards
robotek

Posted on Nov 08, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: muffled sound from speakers when connected to laptop via amplifier

You need to buy an analog to digital converter box if you want to get superb sound quality from your computer.

Posted on Mar 10, 2009

landsend
  • 1066 Answers

SOURCE: Subwoofer Connection Problem

why don't you both return these units and call Denon for replacements without these problems?  Sqeaky hinges get the oil.

Posted on Apr 01, 2009

  • 9 Answers

SOURCE: Low to no volume output from Integra DTR-5.2 receiver

most higher end integra's have a input level adjusment or input selection for each and every input. Perhaps you are not on the correct input, go to onscreen programming and check out the input level and input select - also try the tape in another input like tape 2 or cd. It will not hurt the receiver for a test. Also, if you are using the cheap cables from the manufacturer - try a pair of cables that you know work or go by some. BTW, you don't need to spend $40 for cables order them online through amazon or other store. Gold / sliver plated oxygen free are best.

Posted on Jun 30, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Onkyo TX-8211 receiver with very low volume through speakers

It's the Tape 2 button - unclick it.

Posted on Jul 09, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

3 Answers

My sony STR-DE475 has no bass. The bass just went out after running it for 6 hours.


Either the subwoofer speaker or its amplifier failed - they couldn't handle the extended use. Simple test to find out which: put the volume really low, connect another subwoofer (or a large normal speaker) to the bass output on the receiver and play some music. If you get sound then the original subwoofer is faulty, just get a new one. If you don't get sound then the amplifier for the subwoofer channel has failed. You could replace it yourself if you have enough electronics repair experience, otherwise it will be cheaper to just get another good sh low end receiver from a site like Ebay.

Sep 26, 2011 | Sony STR-DE475 Receiver

1 Answer

Volume at very loud not max protect mode shuts off the amplifier


There is a possible poor air ventilation. Make sure the amplifier has plenty of free space around to ventilate. A good idea is to open the top cover of the amplifier and clean the inner heatsinks using air under pressure. Take care not to remove any cable connectors during this procedure. Keep in mind that using 2 pair of speakers always increase the amplifier temperature.

In case of a problem or clarification or further details needed, don't hesitate to post me a reply before rejecting my answer.
If you are satisfied, rate my solution with the "thumbs" or (even better) add a testimonial.

Thanks and regards
Please kindly rate this solution
Stelios
direct FixYa link: http://www.fixya.com/users/technical114

Sep 11, 2011 | Harman Kardon AVR 140 Receiver

1 Answer

Hi! I have a Pioneer VSX - 415, but get the message "Overload" as soon as I turn the volume up just a little. What can I do?? Eyvind


There are several things you can do, but taking the simplest things first into consideration.

Wiring. If you have any loose speaker terminal connections at either end, or any stray strand wire near the receiver chassis it can cause this problem. It's likely that this is actually NOT the case in your particular situation as it appears to be volume control related, but this condition will also cause an overload message as well.

Speakers...lack of efficiency/sensitivity, high or otherwise unstable Ohm rating will require more power. Ohm ratings are based on a nominal impedance (resistance) of a specified input voltage by industry standards, and can vary considerably with signal frequency. Higher impedance occurs as input frequency is decreased...more on this later.

System setup. How many speakers are connected? Each terminal is designed for one channel connection. If you have multiple speakers, i.e.; spliced in series such as with separate enclosures that have multiple drivers, this increases the resistance and power consumption dramatically.

After the above considerations are addressed and resolved but you are still experiencing the problem, do one or all of the following;

Check your audio configuration. If your system has an equalizer, loudness control or "bass boost", turn them off. More bass requires more power from the amplifier, thus can be a cause of the overload you are experiencing.

Adjust your crossover. If you are using an active subwoofer, increase the crossover frequency point in the speaker setup menu of the receiver. You may or may not have to set your other speakers' setting to "small" to enable the digital crossover feature, but setting them to small is preferred in your case. This will allow the subwoofer (if an active one) to handle a broader spectrum of the bass frequencies, rather than the speakers that are being powered by the receivers' amplifier that is currently being overloaded. It will also improve the sound quality. You however, do not have to have connected nor use a subwoofer to do this type of setup, simply increasing the crossover point will omit some of the lower frequencies that are putting higher demand on the amplifier. Alternatively, you may also increase the crossover frequency at the source material, such as your CD or other player instead of in the receiver.

Dec 12, 2010 | Pioneer VSX-415-S 5.1 Channels Receiver

1 Answer

Turns itself off when volume is turned pu


This is very common problem related to overload of the amplifiers.
There are a few things you can do to remedy this; often only one of which may fix the problem, do more if you have to.

If you prefer to not reduce the volume, then if you have any bass boost, loudness control or equalizer enabled then disable them. It requires more amplifier power.
If there is anything that you have placed on the receiver remove it. There must be enough airflow allowed to the unit to dissipate heat.
Connect more efficient speakers.

Feb 17, 2010 | Kenwood VR-407 Receiver

2 Answers

Can I use front preouts for subwoofer?


First, you have to have a self-powered subwoofer (or two) with this reciver. That means the sub has its own amplifier. These are usually capable of accepting either Line Level (RCA) input or direct L and R amplifier channel speaker wires from your receiver from which it will react only to frequencies in its range. It doesn't actually use any if the power from your receiver's amp.

That is why you can extend your front speakers from the sub. Again, understand this - it is not playing any part in amplifying them. The amps in your receiver are just passing through it.

Setting your speaker 'Type' definition to Large will tell your receiver that they are capable of real bass (as opposed to small satellites) but won't necessarily steal anything from the subs. Set your LFE/Bass Out setting to Both if your front speakers are capable of handling real bass. Why would you want to deny them bass if they can handle it?

This part is confusing "If I can get the sub working on taking the lows out of the front speakers if I set them to large on the receiver then that is one thing less to send to the other sub on the LFE channel". The crossover feature allows you to define what bass goes to the sub. You would use the various points to smooth out the transition between your sub and the rest. Your quote of 47hz spec for something doesn't suggest your other speakers are great bass reproducers. One needs to see the +- db spec with less than x% distortion for that number make any sense.

Your receiver has two RCA Subwoofer Outputs but I'm sure they get the exact same level. If you're having trouble matching two different subs doesn't at least one of them have an adjustment for volume? Or maybe you could use physical positioning to adjust their comparative volume.

May 08, 2009 | Yamaha RX-V663 Receiver

1 Answer

Technics su z2 amp shuts off sound


hello. we cant help if we dont know what music source you are using.

Apr 13, 2009 | Technics SA-AX530 Receiver

1 Answer

I need a manual for Kustom amplifier model K200B-5


Base? Keyboard? Other?  Her is their website but I don't see any place to download from.

http://www.kustom.com/

Dec 29, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

4 Answers

Sherwood rx4105


you may be using an equalizer? try to pop-up the volume with all tone controls in flat mode. see if it still cuts off. if this is the first time youencounter this then something must be wroing with either your speakers or your amp. unless your ventilation is not good enoughg, you can also try placing a blower on top of your unit to cool it down

May 04, 2008 | Sherwood RX-4105 Receiver

3 Answers

My Onkyo Receiver TX 601 is turning itself off


Several things can cause this: Loud signal passages can momentarily draw high currents at the mains, especially if you have unit plugged into power stripe with other equipment. Or if unit is plugged into isolation transformer, current draw may exceed output of transformer. Too many speakers hooked to output or if one is bad (partially shorted due to overheating)

Apr 04, 2008 | Onkyo HTR500 Receiver

1 Answer

Yamaha RX-V730 problems


I used to have a set of speakers with 'poly switch' over-current protectors (kind of a 'soft' fuse the size of a small ceramic capacitor) installed in-line with the speaker terminals. (Each speaker in an enclosure needed its own device.) The theory was they appeared as a dead short until their rating was exceeded, going open-circuit to protect the (assumed, more expensive) speaker element. When things 'cooled down' it returned to the former short status and the speakers came alive again. Testing the device with a decent drive signal (it worked), I noticed the sound 'strangled' and only a low-volume, higher-frequency component of the source signal was heard through the speaker. (So I guess it wasn't *totally* open circuit...) After a few seconds of signal removal (and reduction of source volume) the sound came back to normal. Here's my thought: Perhaps your speakers have these devices installed and the devices are operating accordingly. Of course, if the source signal is of a known low-volume, then it sounds like an amplifier component is failing on load. Especially if the speakers behave normally using another amplier. Cheers...

Jan 26, 2007 | Yamaha RX-V730 Receiver

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio & Video Receivers Logo

Related Topics:

202 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio & Video Receivers Experts

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

68223 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60792 Answers

Are you an Audio and Video Receiver Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...