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The faucet has a leak. Valve stem has a white plastic base rather than a typical washer with screw.

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"deep six" it
American Standard brass is ****!

Posted on Dec 30, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How do I change the washer on faucet


1. turn off water under sink 1st both of them
2.remove the handle screw on top or allen screw under bottom of handle pry off
3.crescent wrench unscrew valve remove
4.on bottom of stem unscrew remove washer{replace the "O" ring on the stem while out}
5. put back and turn on water check for leaks,
Hope this helps let me know Mike

Jan 03, 2016 | Globe Union Glacier Bay 8 In Double Handle...

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How to repair a washer-type faucet


REPAIRING A LEAKY WASHER-TYPE FAUCET

  • Washer-type faucets work with a rubber or composition washer that closes onto a metal washer seat (Fig. 1). The washer can become hardened, worn or the seat wears, causing the faucet to leak. You can close the faucet tighter to stop the leaking temporarily, but this increases the internal damage to the faucet.

  • To repair the leak, first turn off the water. If there's a shutoff valve beneath the fixture, turn off the water at that point. Otherwise, turn it off at the main house shutoff valve in the basement, utility room, or crawlspace. Turn off the hot water supply at the water heater.

  • Take the faucet apart by removing the handle (this may not be necessary on some older faucets). Loosen the Phillips-head screw, which usually is beneath a decorative cap in the center of the handle. The cap either unscrews or snaps off when you pry it with a knife blade. If you must use pliers on decorative faucet parts, pad them with electrical tape or cloth to protect the finish. And take special care with the plastic parts found on many modern faucets. Next, lift or pry the handle off its broached stem. Unscrew the packing nut beneath the handle, exposing the rest of the stem. Remove the stem by rotating it in the "on" direction. It will thread out. Reinstall the handle if you have difficulty turning it (Fig. 1). Clean chips from the faucet cavity, but do not use harsh abrasives or a file.

  • Examine the stem. If the threads are badly corroded or worn, take it to your retailer and get a new stem to match. Clean the stem if it's dirty.

  • Now look at the washer, which is located on the lower end of the stem and held in place by a brass screw. If the washer is squeezed flat or has a groove worn in it, replace it–this should stop any dripping. Take the washer with you to your dealer to ensure an exact match in size and style. If the brass screw is damaged, too, replace it with a new brass screw.

  • The washer seat is located inside the faucet body. You probably can't determine if the washer seat is causing the leak just by looking at it. Any faucet that needs frequent washer replacement obviously has a damaged seat. The seat should either be refaced with a seat-dressing tool. A seat-dressing tool is not costly. Every home with washer-type faucets needs one. Use the tool according to the manufacturer's directions, placing it in the faucet along with the packing nut. Then rotate (Fig. 2) until the seat is smooth, and blow out the chips.

  • Some washer seats can be unthreaded and replaced. Check the faucet body with a flashlight to see if it has a square or hexagonal hole through its center or is slotted for a screwdriver; if so, it is replaceable. However, if the seat simply has a round hole through its center and no slots, it is not replaceable. In this case, dress it with a seat-dressing tool. To replace it, you'll need a faucet seat wrench, which comes with a combination of square and hex heads to fit most faucet seats. Turn the washer seat counterclockwise to loosen, clockwise to tighten (Fig. 3). Add a little silicone rubber sealant (RTV) or pipe joint compound around the threads of the seat before you install it to make it easier to remove during future repairs.

  • It's important to install the correct type of faucet washer (Fig. 1, bottom). A swiveling washer (C) is preferable to either (A) or (B). To install washer style (C), file the shoulder off the end of the stem, drill out the threads of the screw hole. Instead of rubbing against the seat as it closes, a swiveling washer closes with a straight-down, frictionless action – this allows it to outlast fixed washers.

  • Following this seat and washer service, your faucet should be like new. Put the parts back together in the reverse order of taking them apart. Spread a bit of petroleum jelly or silicone grease on the threads of the stem to lubricate the faucet's action.

  • If the faucet leaks around the stem rather than from the spigot, install new packing. You may want to install one of the newer nylon-covered or graphite-impregnated packings–their lubrication allows the faucet handle to turn more freely. Wrap one turn of this packing around the stem just beneath the packing nut (Fig. 1). Use three complete wraps if you're applying string-type packing. Some stems use O-rings, rather than packing. For these stems, replace the O-ring with a matching one to stop a leak. Hand tighten the packing nut, then tighten it another half-turn.

on Jan 16, 2010 | Plumbing

1 Answer

My shower faucet is leaking


this could be abad tap washer
a faulty loose pipe connection
or a faulty tap
turn of your water supply at the outside your house before proceeding
remove the handle on your tap then remove insert screw valve usually with a spanner or shifter
you should see a copper or plastic stem inside with a flat washer at the end which
http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-fix-a-dripping-tap-bib-or-pillar
hope this helps

Nov 06, 2011 | Moen & One Handle Tub & Shower Faucet

1 Answer

Turn water on and it has a squeal -- does it on both hot and cold side


A common but annoying problem for many people, especially those who own older homes, is a squealing faucet. The good news is that a squealing faucet is not too difficult to fix if you have the time and the proper tools. Rather than hiring a plumber and potentially paying hundreds of dollars, fix this issue yourself. In most cases, a squealing faucet is due to worn parts, such as handle threads that have lost their lubrication.

  1. Turn off your water at the source by locating the main water line and turning the valve that controls the water.

  2. 2

    Plug the drain in the sink you're working in to avoid dropping any small parts and losing them. Line up all parts in the order you are removing them, which will make it easier to remember when you put them back together.

  3. 3

    Pop the plastic end caps off the handles of the faucet and set them aside.

  4. 4

    Locate the screws in the center of the faucet handles and unscrew them.

  5. 5

    Pull off each of the faucet handles by rotating them back and forth until they come off. If they're not coming off easily, use a wrench wrapped around a rag to remove them.

  6. 6

    Line the inner threads of the handle stems with silicone grease.

  7. 7

    Reinstall both handles and turn the water back on. If you still are experiencing squealing, repeat the same process of removing both handles again.

  8. 8

    Remove the entire valve stem by using a wrench to loosen the packing nut and pulling the valve stem assembly out.

  9. 9

    Check the washer at the base of the valve stem assembly for visible damage. If it appears worn or damaged, take the entire valve stem assembly to a hardware store and find a replacement washer that fits.

  10. 10

    Inspect all other parts of the valve stem for visible damage. Take the stem to the hardware store to get a second opinion if you think there may be damage to other parts.

  11. 11

    Replace any necessary parts of the valve stem, and tighten all parts thoroughly as you reinstall them. Loose parts may also be a case of squealing faucets.

  12. 12

    Turn the water back on once again at the main source, and your squealing faucet should be fixed.

Feb 05, 2011 | Delta Plumbing

1 Answer

I can not take the handle off of my shower valve to get to the cartridge. i have a seabury grohe shower valve.


There is usually a set screw near the base of the handle that holds the handle on the valve stem if the handle is metal. if it is acrylic then there is a plastic cover that hides a screw which fastens it to the valve stem.

Nov 24, 2010 | Grohe Plumbing

1 Answer

Kitchen taps drip and leak.I do not want to replace with new but would like to sort these problems.


dependent on the type of faucet, you need to replace (a) the washers, (b.) the spring and seals or (c.) the gasket. They all serve the same purpose. 1. turn off the water supply to the faucet. 2. double handle? (a)remove the center cap (b) then remove the screw holding the handle down (c)next unscrew the valve stem retaining nut (normally it is the one right above the faucet body). (d) pull the valve stem out, if there is a small rubber piece held down by screw remove the screw, replace the washer. if there is a rubber gasket wrapped around the stem, remove and replace it, if nothing is on the stem look into the faucet body you should see 1 or 2 small rubber pieces these are the seals the springs are right below the seals. Remove and replace springs and seals. 3. single handle? remove the handle retaining screw, normally covered by hot/cold indicator symbol, unscrew valve stem retaining nut, pull the valve stem and replace either the gasket or springs and seals.

Aug 28, 2009 | Home

1 Answer

I have all 3 new shower valves purchased from home depot to replace old and they are all leaking from the threads where you tighten down vave stem.Ive tried thread tap they still leak...


Most Price Phister valve cartridges have a plastic washer or "O" ring at the base of the cartridge, where it screws into the valve body. Replacements should be available at H/Depot, Lowe's/similar.
Regards, --W/D--

Jul 13, 2009 | Price Pfister Plumbing

2 Answers

Single handle faucet is leaking from the center.


You need to get a kit to rebuild the faucet which may sound daunting but actually is not. Since you did not state the brand of faucet, which I assume you do not know since you just moved in, you will need to go to a home depot or lowes and find a similar faucet to know what brand you have. Then ask the plumbing expert there how to proceed.

Apr 02, 2009 | Plumbing

1 Answer

Kitchen sink keeps dripping...how and what do I need to do to stop the dripping


Is this a single handle faucet or a double handle? If it's a single handle, you have to turn the water off then remove the handle. The set screw for this should be under a little plastic plug under the handle near the base of the handle. After you remove the handle, remove the housing cap to expose the valve ball. Under the valve ball are 2 small circular washers and springs. Pull them out and replace them. If it is a cartridge style faucet like a Moen, then you remove the u shaped retaining ring and pull the cartridge out.

If it is a double handle faucet, remove the handle and using a pair of pliers or a crestent wrench remove the stem. You will find the washer at the base of the stem held on by a screw. It could also be a washerless stem and in that case you will need to replace the whole stem.

If you have anymore questions, just respond to the post and I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Mar 22, 2009 | American Standard Plumbing

1 Answer

Shower spout


There is a threaded stem that passes through the spout and attaches to the white plastic diveter valve. If you are starting from scratch (everything apart), you can put it back together in this order:
1) Place the white plastic diverter inside the spout. the circular side with the black round washer should face the the wall side of the shower (mating up against the threads for the water pipe).
2) The stem can now be inserted from the top and into the notched section of the white plastic diverter valve. The threaded end of the stem shoud be outside of the spout (from the top side).
3) A round black washer fits over the threads. It should sit right where the threads end. Dont push it all the way on to the unthreaded portion of the stem.
4) Screw the threaded knob onto the threads.

Should be ready to install now. Including the spout itself, there are 5 parts and are configured in this order from top to bottom.
1) Female threaded knob (the knob for operating the spout)
2) Threaded stem (threads on top)
3) Round black washer
4) Spout
5) Whit plastic diverter valve.

Mine leaks when I turn on the shower, thus reducing shower pressure. I looks like a poor design to me. The stem is not a tight fit in the spout and this allows the diverter to "wobble". The washer on the diverter valve does not seat tightly and allows water to leak out the tub spout when showering. I would replace the spout.

Jan 30, 2009 | Price Pfister 01-311 Shower Head, Tub...

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