Question about Microsoft Windows XP Professional

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Access Dened on Local networked drive

Hi Folks

I have mapped one of my shared folders on my PC to a drive (I). Ensuring all permissions are correctly set( I have given myself FULL permission on both the shared folder and the mapped drive) I still cant create folders or files on the mapped drive i.e. I. However I can create files and folders on the shared folder that is mapped.

Could one of you Wizards have any ideas why? I have trawled thru the net looking for a possible reasons. Have tried some of the resolution presented on the net but still no luck.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

Siraj.

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  • Numpty007 Jul 07, 2008

    The shared drive is an NTFS partition.



    I used 'net use I: \\compautername\sharedfolder



    This created the networked I drive correctly. But I dont have permission to create files or folders in them. Whereas I have full permission to create in 'sharedfolder'. I checked the permissions and Idont think I can give myself more access rights than I have given i.e. FULL permissions.



    Hope this clarifies.

  • nsindian
    nsindian May 11, 2010

    are both computers XP SP2 + ?

  • nsindian
    nsindian May 11, 2010

    What kind of partition are these "drives" set up on? I mean is the partition an NTFS or FAT32 format?

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  • 233 Answers

If u r using NTFS you should go to the shared folder-->right click it-->click sharing and security -->go to security tab-->add the your user and give it full permission.

you may need to be logged with same user name on the other Pc that has the mapped drive .

Posted on Jul 07, 2008

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68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
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68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
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68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
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68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
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68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
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68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
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